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  1. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    29 Jun '06 23:24


    Black has just made his 8th move. Give the gamescore that led to the position.
  2. 29 Jun '06 23:32
    Originally posted by BigDoggProblem
    [fen]rnbqkb1r/2ppp1pp/p7/p7/8/8/PPPP1PPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 9[/fen]

    Black has just made his 8th move. Give the gamescore that led to the position.
    It's impossible.
  3. Standard member leisurelysloth
    Man of Steel
    30 Jun '06 00:01
    is it something like

    1.e4 a5
    2.e5 Nc6
    3.e6 Nb8
    4.exf7 Nc6
    5.fxg8=B Nb8
    6.Ba6 bxa6
    7.Bc4 Nc6
    8.Bf1 Nb8
  4. 30 Jun '06 00:11 / 1 edit
    Hmm.....
  5. Standard member ETR
    30 Jun '06 00:42
    Originally posted by leisurelysloth
    is it something like

    1.e4 a5
    2.e5 Nc6
    3.e6 Nb8
    4.exf7 Nc6
    5.fxg8=B Nb8
    6.Ba6 bxa6
    7.Bc4 Nc6
    8.Bf1 Nb8
    exf7 puts black in check.

    How does the white bishop move from g8 to a6?
  6. 30 Jun '06 01:37
    yay I can do it in 11...
  7. 30 Jun '06 01:45
    Originally posted by leisurelysloth
    is it something like

    1.e4 a5
    2.e5 Nc6
    3.e6 Nb8
    4.exf7 Nc6
    5.fxg8=B Nb8
    6.Ba6 bxa6
    7.Bc4 Nc6
    8.Bf1 Nb8
    But wouldn't 4. exf7 be exf7+, requiring Kxf? How about:

    1. e4 a5
    2. e5 f6
    3. exf Kf7
    4. Ba6 Kg6
    5. f7 bxB
    6. fxN=B Kf6
    7. Bc4 Kf7 puts K into check! Arg!
    8. Bf1 Ke8

    I can do it a couple of different ways in 9 moves, but not in 8!
  8. Standard member ngkabra
    Navin
    30 Jun '06 05:56
    Got it! Nice problem. Thanks.

    Answer:
    1. e4 a5
    2. Ba6 bxa6
    3. e5 Bb7
    4. e6 Qc8
    5. exf7+ Kd8
    6. fxg8=B Ke8
    7. Bc4 Qd8
    8. Bf1 Bc8
  9. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    30 Jun '06 06:19
    Originally posted by ngkabra
    Got it! Nice problem. Thanks.

    Answer:
    1. e4 a5
    2. Ba6 bxa6
    3. e5 Bb7
    4. e6 Qc8
    5. exf7+ Kd8
    6. fxg8=B Ke8
    7. Bc4 Qd8
    8. Bf1 Bc8
    Very good. Paradoxically, the bK must step aside to d8, and not f7 as it appears from the diagram.
  10. 30 Jun '06 10:26
    Excellent problem, BigDogg. Who composed it and where did you find it?

    Please post a few more like that.
  11. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    30 Jun '06 18:13
    Originally posted by David Tebb
    Excellent problem, BigDogg. Who composed it and where did you find it?

    Please post a few more like that.
    The problem was composed by Joost de Heer and used in the Messigny 2006 solving tournament.

    I'll put a couple more problems from that event up in seperate threads.
  12. 02 Jul '06 15:08
    Originally posted by ngkabra
    Got it! Nice problem. Thanks.

    Answer:
    1. e4 a5
    2. Ba6 bxa6
    3. e5 Bb7
    4. e6 Qc8
    5. exf7+ Kd8
    6. fxg8=B Ke8
    7. Bc4 Qd8
    8. Bf1 Bc8
    one problem with Ba6 bxa6, white still has his bishop
  13. 02 Jul '06 15:39
    Originally posted by c guy1
    one problem with Ba6 bxa6, white still has his bishop
    What are you saying? 2.Ba6 bxa6 and the bishopis gone, no?
  14. 02 Jul '06 17:05
    Originally posted by c guy1
    one problem with Ba6 bxa6, white still has his bishop
    now look at move 6
  15. 02 Jul '06 19:40
    This beautiful problem reminds me of a book by Raymond Smullyan, "The chess mysteries of Sherlock Holmes". I haven't seen it mentioned before on RHP. In it the great detective solves several mysteries using what he calls "retrograde analysis". Here's a fairly easy example:



    "As you see, Watson, neither side is mated-not even in check. And we are given that your side is White. The question now is this: Given that Black moved last, what was his last move, and White's last move?"

    Even Watson gets it fairly quickly. Other problems are trickier.