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  1. Standard member Bobby Chess
    Anaconda Squeeze
    06 May '09 06:05
    How to attack the fianchettoed King

  2. 06 May '09 09:23 / 2 edits
    If there was one thing Fischer was good at, it was attacking a kingside fianchetto. Here is another example where he brutalises Karl Robatsch:



    13. g4 is a great move. I remember being shown this game a long time ago and wondering why Black couldn't simply capture the pawn with 13. ... Nxg4. It wasn't until I looked at the game again, years later as a much stronger player, that I realised that whilst there may not be a forced win for White, after 14. Rdg1 White has enormous pressure and is very difficult for Black to defend.

    What does Mr. Fritz think of 13. g4?
  3. Standard member Bobby Chess
    Anaconda Squeeze
    06 May '09 17:31
    Brilliant....I think he is one of the greatest chess if not the greatest player who ever live
  4. 12 Oct '09 15:01
    Originally posted by Bobby Chess
    Brilliant....I think he is one of the greatest chess if not the greatest player who ever live
    nice to see old fisher photos posted at chessbae.com
    a much happier time for him as a young man.
  5. 12 Oct '09 15:59 / 1 edit
    I love this one although not an attack on a fianchettoed
    king, taken from my sixty memorable games,
    in which Fischer systematically removes any resistance to
    domination of blacks queenside light squares.



    features the unusual 6.h3 and also 7.Nd5, of which Fischer
    states in his book, the intention is, to exploit the hole on
    QB6 (c6 to you and I). also noteworthy is exchange of d5
    knight for f6 knight, further weakening the defence of
    blacks white squares and the exchange sacrifice, rook
    for light squared bishop, making them all but impossible
    to defend. It is nothing short of genius!
  6. 14 Oct '09 23:55
    Originally posted by Bobby Chess
    How to attack the fianchettoed King

    [pgn]1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.Be3 Bg7 7.f3 0-0 8.Qd2 Nc6 9.Bc4 Nxd4 10.Bxd4 Be6 11.Bb3 Qa5 12.0-0-0 b5 13.Kb1 b4 14.Nd5 Bxd5 15.Bxd5 Rac8 16.Bb3 Rc7 17.h4 Qb5 18.h5 Rfc8 19.hxg6 hxg6 20.g4 a5 21.g5 Nh5 22.Rxh5 gxh5 23.g6 e5 24.gxf7+ Kf8 25.Be3 d5 26.exd5 Rxf7 27.d6 Rf6 28.Bg5 Qb7 29.Bxf6 Bxf6 30.d7 Rd8 31.Qd6[/pgn]
    Move 22. R.h5 .... . "Ive made this sacrifice so often, I feel like applying for a patent" -- Fischer.
  7. Standard member PBE6
    Bananarama
    15 Oct '09 14:46
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    I love this one although not an attack on a fianchettoed
    king, taken from my sixty memorable games,
    in which Fischer systematically removes any resistance to
    domination of blacks queenside light squares.

    [pgn][Event "Varna Olympiad Final"]
    [Site "-"]
    [Date "1962.09.28"]
    [Round "2"]
    [White "Robert James Fischer"]
    [Black "Miguel Najdorf ...[text shortened]... making them all but impossible
    to defend. It is nothing short of genius!
    Great game, thanks for posting it.

    Question though, what's the follow-up to 7. ... Nxe4? If 8. Qf3, then 8. ... Nc5 is alright, no?
  8. 15 Oct '09 23:28
    Originally posted by PBE6
    Great game, thanks for posting it.

    Question though, what's the follow-up to 7. ... Nxe4? If 8. Qf3, then 8. ... Nc5 is alright, no?
    hi PBe6, i managed to decipher Fischers own analysis from his book, which is not easy, for he gives so many twists and turns in descriptive notation, but here are the lines anyhow.

    he awards 7...Nxp! with an exclamation mark, and gives the following.

    8.Qf3 Nc5

    and then states, white is confronted with two main lines

    9.Nf6+? gxf6
    10.Qxa8 Bb7
    11.Qa7 Qc7
    12.b4 Nd7



    ending up in this position, of which he states,
    black has excellent play for the exchange

    or



    11.Qa7 e5
    12.b4 exd4
    13.bxNc5 Qe7+
    14.Be2 Nc6
    15.Qb6 dxc5
    16.0-0! is good for white

    and line b he gives as follows,
    which he evaluates as equal.



    9.b4 e6
    10.bxc5 exd5
    11.Qxd5 Ra7

    dada