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  1. 19 Sep '12 16:12
    An Open Letter to the Stonewall:
    http://www.chessvibes.com/davidsmerdon/an-open-letter-to-the-stonewall
  2. 20 Sep '12 07:47
    Originally posted by Fat Lady
    An Open Letter to the Stonewall:
    http://www.chessvibes.com/davidsmerdon/an-open-letter-to-the-stonewall
    LOL, what a thoroughly wonderful read, which of us has not gone through some love affair with an opening only to realise later, that love was not all that it purported to be!
  3. 21 Sep '12 21:43
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie to FatLady
    LOL, what a thoroughly wonderful read, which of us has not gone through
    some love affair with an opening only to realise later, that love was not all that it purported to be!
    GM David Smerdon assumed that Stonewall would be easy to pick up. Then he
    discovered it's more enjoyable for a weekend fling than for a lasting commitment.

    GM Wolfgang Uhlmann's well-known for his love of and expertise on the French
    Defence. After a promising start at the 1976 Interzonal in Manila, GM Uhlmann
    stayed loyal to the opening that he loved and knew so deeply, even though it
    was going through a theoretical crisis. Uhlmann lost four games with it (against
    Gheorghiu, Kavalek, Mecking, and Spassky).
  4. 22 Sep '12 18:05
    Originally posted by Fat Lady
    An Open Letter to the Stonewall:
    http://www.chessvibes.com/davidsmerdon/an-open-letter-to-the-stonewall
    In their 1951 book for novices, _How to Think Ahead in Chess_,
    Horowitz and Reinfield recommend the Stonewall for White, but not Black.
  5. 22 Sep '12 18:09
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    LOL, what a thoroughly wonderful read, which of us has not gone through some love affair with an opening only to realise later, that love was not all that it purported to be!
    You'd be so easy to love,
    So easy to idolize, all others above,
    So worth the yearning for,
    So swell to keep every home fire burning for.
    And we'd be so grand at the game,
    Carefree together, it does seem a shame
    That you can't see your future with me
    Cause you'd be, oh, so easy to love.
    --Cole Porter
  6. 23 Sep '12 16:45 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    You'd be so easy to love,
    So easy to idolize, all others above,
    So worth the yearning for,
    So swell to keep every home fire burning for.
    And we'd be so grand at the game,
    Carefree together, it does seem a shame
    That you can't see your future with me
    Cause you'd be, oh, so easy to love.
    --Cole Porter
    A song of unrequited love, ouch, straight for the heart. In Pakistan they have a name
    for girls that one is never destined to love despite deep affections, they call them,
    Kalashnikovs, after the Russian AK-47 rifle, because they will kill you inside, just the
    same
  7. 23 Sep '12 23:22
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    A song of unrequited love, ouch, straight for the heart. In Pakistan they have a name
    for girls that one is never destined to love despite deep affections, they call them,
    Kalashnikovs, after the Russian AK-47 rifle, because they will kill you inside, just the
    same
    If it's true that men refer to some women as 'Kalashnikovs', it could provoke
    some crude jokes. The AK-47 has a reputation of still working (being highly
    resistant to jamming) under harsh conditions, including mistreatment by its
    users. Mikhail Kalashnikov designed it with a comparatively loose tolerance
    (less accuracy but more reliability) in its internal workings. And comparing
    an AK-47's parts to a woman's, well, you can finish the joke on your own.
  8. 23 Sep '12 23:36
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    If it's true that men refer to some women as 'Kalashnikovs', it could provoke
    some crude jokes. The AK-47 has a reputation of still working (being highly
    resistant to jamming) under harsh conditions, including mistreatment by its
    users. Mikhail Kalashnikov designed it with a comparatively loose tolerance
    (less accuracy but more reliability) in its in ...[text shortened]... . And comparing
    an AK-47's parts to a woman's, well, you can finish the joke on your own.
    no i have never heard it used crudely, just a simple metaphor attempting to convey the potency and deadliness of unrequited love, its rather poetic me thinks, in a direct way.
  9. 24 Sep '12 00:41
    I don't know anything about the lad Smerdon.
    But did his Stonewall not contribute to his GM title.
    Seems a shame to ditch it now if it served him so well.

    Maybe it's a bluff to stop his opponents prepping against him.

    Wrote a similiar article around 5.Qe2 in the Pirc many years ago.
    'The End of a Variation' think it's in an old Scottish Chess.

    An opening at one time I had six or seven - nil with. Then too many where
    being shown or published, other poeple started playing it and some fool
    came up with 5...c6. The wins dried up, the losses piled up.
    Still play it in blitz but very rarely get 5...Nc6.

    G. Chandler - A. White, Edinburgh Summer Cup, 1980.
    32 years ago. Gosh. I still got the wee adrenalin rush just playing over it
    and adding the notes.

  10. 24 Sep '12 01:02
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    I don't know anything about the lad Smerdon.
    But did his Stonewall not contribute to his GM title.
    Seems a shame to ditch it now if it served him so well.

    Maybe it's a bluff to stop his opponents prepping against him.

    Wrote a similiar article around 5.Qe2 in the Pirc many years ago.
    'The End of a Variation' think it's in an old Scottish Chess.
    ...[text shortened]... Alastair White was something like 4-0 against at the time so this was a good win.)}[/pgn]
    'Seems a shame to ditch it now if it served him so well.'
    --Greenpawn34

    To continue the analogy in his 'open letter to Stonewall', how much would
    GM David Smerdon's discarding Stonewall after it contributed to his chess
    title be different from, say, Dr David Smerdon discarding his first wife after
    she had contributed to putting him through medical school?
  11. 24 Oct '12 10:34
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    I don't know anything about the lad Smerdon.
    But did his Stonewall not contribute to his GM title.
    Seems a shame to ditch it now if it served him so well.

    Maybe it's a bluff to stop his opponents prepping against him.

    Wrote a similiar article around 5.Qe2 in the Pirc many years ago.
    'The End of a Variation' think it's in an old Scottish Chess.
    ...[text shortened]... Alastair White was something like 4-0 against at the time so this was a good win.)}[/pgn]
    Hi GP. Nice game!

    You note after 13 Nf4 that if black plays 13 ... dxc4, then there is 14 Ne4 followed by Nd6+. Could you elaborate on this a little, showing one or two lines? For example, what if black plays 14 ... Bd7?

    Thanks!
  12. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    24 Oct '12 11:15 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    In their 1951 book for novices, _How to Think Ahead in Chess_,
    Horowitz and Reinfield recommend the Stonewall for White, but not Black.
    That was one of my very first books. I played the Stonewall in my very first tournament, and won all three games where I had white (as Black I lost a QGD Lasker and a Dragon, staying true to the book!). I tied for 3rd in the section, won $50, and bought my first chess clock.

    I abandoned it after that one tournament to play the KIA due to the influence of a local Master (and Fischer), but I have very fond memories.

    I think that book was ahead of it's time as a repertoire book. Opening suggestions aside, the very idea of preparing for tournaments in that manner was incredibly eye-opening for me.
  13. 24 Oct '12 16:08 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by Paul Leggett
    That was one of my very first books. I played the Stonewall in my very first tournament, and won all three games where I had white (as Black I lost a QGD Lasker and a Dragon, staying true to the book!). I tied for 3rd in the section, won $50, and bought my first chess clock.

    I abandoned it after that one tournament to play the KIA due to the influe e, the very idea of preparing for tournaments in that manner was incredibly eye-opening for me.
    I myself am a little bemused why the great fatlady chose me, perhaps because he
    knows I like a good chess read, rather than on the state of my play. I am only ever
    likely to enter into a stonewall using the Botvinnic system of my English, although
    rather interestingly, hardly any of my games have gone that way and I use the English
    exclusively. Mostly i find people try to play either as a Kings Indian, or classically with
    ...e5, ...Nf6 and ...d5 and we enter a kind of reversed dragon. I have lost count of
    the number of times i have faced this, which i think is just good for white,



  14. 25 Oct '12 14:20 / 3 edits
    Hi Linden.

    The article in CHESS says the player of the Black pieces had played 12.....Qe7
    a few weeks previously in the Tyne & Weir congress and won.
    I knew nothing about this game, I found all the sacs OTB.

    14...Bd7 after taking the c4 Bishop.



    There is another note from actual game after 14.Bxd5 saying Black can try to give
    up his Queen in the most expensive way possible.
    It was given as possible line to show the trouble Black is in.
    Nice stinger in the tail when Black thinks he got down to a Rook and oppo Bishop ending.