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  1. 02 Dec '06 15:20
    What is the difference between Fritz 10 and Deep Fritz 10 to a mediocre player. Any functional differences besides playing strength. Any better teaching functions in either? I have a duo Core 2 laptop that could handle Deep Fritz.
    Thanks,
    LG
  2. Standard member HomerJSimpson
    Renouned Grob Killer
    02 Dec '06 15:26
    I believe deep fritz is duel processor
  3. 02 Dec '06 15:32
    Deep Fritz is supposed to work fine on either a single processor or core duo 2. Same questions remain.
    Thanks.
    LG
  4. 02 Dec '06 15:41 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by TallSurgeon
    What is the difference between Fritz 10 and Deep Fritz 10 to a mediocre player. Any functional differences besides playing strength. Any better teaching functions in either? I have a duo Core 2 laptop that could handle Deep Fritz.
    Thanks,
    LG
    "Deep Fritz 10" is the multiprocessor version of Fritz 10. The program will run on multiple processors or multiple cores, making use of the additional computational power to speed up the overall performance of the program. Incidentally this is not possible with the regular Fritz 10, which will use the resources of just one processor in a multi-processor environment.

    Running on a Intel Core 2 duo system, which is fast becoming the entry level computer hardware today, Deep Fritz 10 will give you a speedup of about 1.8 as opposed to a single-processor system. This means it will run at 1.8 million positions per seconds instead of one million on a single-core system of similar speed.


    With Deep Fritz 10 you get the same results as Fritz 10, just a lot quicker. Instead of having to wait three minutes for the dramatic refutation to appear on the screen, it is there in 100 seconds; and shallower tactics are found in ten seconds instead of 18. That may not sound like much, but when you have hundreds of moves to test, and time is critical, you will be very thankful that the program is giving you the correct answers in almost half the time it would normally take.


    (quote from: chessbase news)
    [Link: http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=3511]

    Hope this helps.
  5. 02 Dec '06 15:47
    Great answer. Thanks.
    LG
  6. 02 Dec '06 15:51
    If you aren't a grandmaster, you won't notice a difference in quality of play. For a normal player with a multiple processor, itll be about twice as quick in analysis.