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  1. 10 Feb '11 15:31
    So, I recently had a game where I threw caution to the wind early on in the hope of a mate through sacrificing pieces. Game No. 8150798
    It didn't work out in the end, but it was a close run thing. If someone has the time to tell me where I went wrong, it would be appreciated. I want to try riskier gambits in chess, rather than grinding out victories
    Cheers
  2. Standard member Thabtos
    I am become Death
    10 Feb '11 17:05


    You really gotta to consider your opponent's defensive options when deciding to sac, especially when you take into account the fact he can sit in front of an analysis board for a day to prove you wrong.

    I've gotten to where I won't sac unless I can calculate a mate or at least some material back.
  3. 10 Feb '11 18:39
    Thanks for that (how did you embed the game by the way?)
    I generally go by trial and error, so this was an attempt to be risky. I think more forward planning is probably needed in the future though
  4. 10 Feb '11 20:33
    My rating isn't much higher than yours, but I can run an analysis engine. A few light comments:


  5. 11 Feb '11 02:50
    The problem with Bxh6 is that you've really only got 2 pieces to attack with-- the Queen and the light squared Bishop-- which really isn't sufficient to get an attack going. Your Queenside is underdeveloped, and in addition to having strong defensive resources (i.e Nf6) Black has central counterplay. I think you definitely had attacking chances here, but it had to be prepared a bit first. Moves like Ne2, followed by e4-e5 or Be5 come to mind, or even Qg3 and an eventual f4.
  6. 11 Feb '11 11:03
    Originally posted by morgski
    So, I recently had a game where I threw caution to the wind early on in the hope of a mate through sacrificing pieces. Game No. 8150798
    It didn't work out in the end, but it was a close run thing. If someone has the time to tell me where I went wrong, it would be appreciated. I want to try riskier gambits in chess, rather than grinding out victories
    Cheers
    Unsound,of course,but I don't think your attack was such a bad attempt from a practical point of view.
    In fact,the game proves it because you had a draw by repetition at move 25.
    These attacks are a gamble,relying on the fact the opponent cannot defend well.
    They often work

    I think you played it well too.Just two remarks:
    -try not to attack before you're fully developed (imagine adding a knight to that attack)
    -when 2 pieces down and your attack refuted TAKE THE DRAW!

    Happy hunting,
    toet.
  7. 11 Feb '11 12:20
    Hi just a quick glance.

    Here...


    If you are going to attack then out number his defenders.
    Give him the b-pawn.

    10.Nc2 Qxb2 11.Ne2


    The Knight swings to g3 and the fun can begin.
    He will also have to stop to hold his b-pawn to stop Rb1 and allowing a Rook on the 7th.
  8. 11 Feb '11 15:59
    That was very useful, thank you all
  9. 11 Feb '11 21:27
    Just had a quick look at your game...I wont comment past move 13.Bxh6?...as already pointed out you must get Deveopled and get more pieces into the attack...if you must attack at all cost no matter be it good or bad then get your pawns rolling...instead of 12.Bf4...12.Kh1 13.Rg1 14.g4 15.h4 or 12.g4 13.h4 if you really are in such a hurry!...use your pawns as battering rams!...and if you like taking risk then drop d4 and switch to e4 which i think would be more suited to your style...hope this has helped.
  10. 12 Feb '11 00:35 / 1 edit
    Good advice there, the lad has dabbled with 1.e4 he plays 2.Bc4 v 1...e5.
    He likes to hit f7 early doors and sacs on f7 given half a chance.

    This one is good.

    morgski - jolivos RHP 2006

  11. 15 Feb '11 17:05
    Wow, I don't even remember this game. I had to go into my archive to check it was me! Yep, that is the sort of saccing I am talking about
  12. 15 Feb '11 17:16
    Thanks for that pawnriot, I settled on two ways of playing (white and black) to become familiar with what I may expect from an opponent.
    Hence the d4, Bf4, e3 as white.
    Again because I prefer to attack, the preference for black is (e4) d5, (xd5) c6, (xc6) p/Nxc6, as I find the open board usually makes up for being a pawn down.
    I'm reaching the stage where I could try something new though, so I'll explore the e4 openings next.

    All the best

    Morgan