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  1. 07 Jan '08 03:46
    any one can advice what opening is good for D4 counter?
  2. 07 Jan '08 04:03
    Originally posted by lesstaire6
    any one can advice what opening is good for D4 counter?
    QGA...and and anything that starts with 1...Nf6.
  3. Standard member wittywonka
    Chocolate Expert
    07 Jan '08 04:07 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by lesstaire6
    any one can advice what opening is good for D4 counter?
    Most of black's reasonable responses to 1.d4 come in the form of 1. ... Nf6, but there are others, as well.

    The Nimzo-Indian Defense 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4
    The Queen's Indian Defense 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6
    The King's Indian Defense 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7
    The Grunfeld Defense 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5

    The Queen's Gambit Accepted 1. d4 d5 2. c4 dxc4
    The Queen's Gambit Declined 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6
    The Queen's Gambit - Slav Defense 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6

    The Dutch Defense 1. d4 f5

    If you were looking for personal "testimonials" of sorts, I have experimented with the King's Indian Defense and Queen's Gambit Accepted. I never knew how to play the King's Indian Defense well, so I always ran into closed positions, but I'm using databases as much as possible now that I'm trying the Queen's Gambit Accepted, and overall the positions are not bad.
  4. Standard member Red Night
    RHP Prophet
    07 Jan '08 04:52
    Nimzo or the Cambridge Springs.
  5. Subscriber AttilaTheHorn
    Erro Ergo Sum
    07 Jan '08 12:02
    I've had a great deal of success with the Nimzo-Indian Defence. However, at first I messed it up tremendously because I was so used to the Queen's Gambit. I always wanted to play moves that I thought could lead back there. Nevertheless, in the course of time I came to understand hypermodern openings, which is what the Nimzo-Indian is, and I came to love them.
    If you use the Nimzo, you'll have to know the Bogo-Indian as well because the two are related. In the same manner, if you use the King's Indian, you'll have to know the Grunfeld too.
    Openings that reply to 1. d4 with 1. ... Nf6 are a very aggressive and take the fight to the opponent.
  6. 07 Jan '08 15:13
    Originally posted by AttilaTheHorn
    I've had a great deal of success with the Nimzo-Indian Defence. However, at first I messed it up tremendously because I was so used to the Queen's Gambit. I always wanted to play moves that I thought could lead back there. Nevertheless, in the course of time I came to understand hypermodern openings, which is what the Nimzo-Indian is, and I came to lov ...[text shortened]... at reply to 1. d4 with 1. ... Nf6 are a very aggressive and take the fight to the opponent.
    You don't need to know the Bogo-Indian to play the Nimzo. It'd be nice to know, since if white plays 3. Nf3 the Bogo is an alternative for Black that is similar, but black can also transpose into the QGD or play a Benoni. And you really don't need to know the Grunfeld to play the KID as these are two completely separate openings.
  7. Subscriber AttilaTheHorn
    Erro Ergo Sum
    07 Jan '08 16:07
    Originally posted by scandium
    You don't need to know the Bogo-Indian to play the Nimzo. It'd be nice to know, since if white plays 3. Nf3 the Bogo is an alternative for Black that is similar, but black can also transpose into the QGD or play a Benoni. And you really don't need to know the Grunfeld to play the KID as these are two completely separate openings.
    These are good points. It illustrates how these particular openings involve transposition and the competition to arrive in the opening one wants to end up in. For me, I am almost always successful in staying in the Nimzo (or Bogo, which, as you say, can be viewed as a variation in the Nimzo). To be reasonably successful in this, one has to look at all the ways an opponent can try to take you out of your opening, and to investigate counter measures to stay rooted in your own choice. This is not always feasible in all openings.
    Hey, this is a good discussion.
  8. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    07 Jan '08 16:30 / 1 edit
    I started with QID, couldn't understand the positional aspects, moved to nimzo which bored me to death. then came KID which suited me better because I could get more active positions, but I always had some problems with getting cramped. then I started playing leningrad dutch, and am finally content enough to really study it (a lot of my troubles with the previous openings were caused by inexperience).

    leningrad's active, no problems with getting cramped, and you can play it against anything but 1.e4 and 1.f4. and as an added plus, you can play it as white as well, so everything you learn will have twice the impact. you'll need to conquer the fear of exposing your king though.
  9. 07 Jan '08 16:44
    Players who reply to 1.d4 with ...Nf6 may encounter the Trompowsky - 1.d4...Nf6, 2. Bg5 I'm happy with this as I play it from the white side.

    2...Ne4, 2...c5, 2...e6 and 2...d5 are a few of blacks possible responses...seems worth having some preparation in one of these lines if you're planning to play 1...Nf6 IMHO
  10. Standard member chessisvanity
    THE BISHOP GOD
    07 Jan '08 16:50
    1.d4...d5!!

    QGD with 2.e6 of course.
  11. 07 Jan '08 16:51
    Originally posted by lesstaire6
    any one can advice what opening is good for D4 counter?
    If you like to be able to counter-attack early on, I'd recommend the Budapest gambit.
  12. Standard member ivan2908
    SelfProclaimedTitler
    07 Jan '08 17:42
    I am annoyed to play against 1. d4 because there is SO MUCH theory... And since it is not open like 1. e4 it is basically adjusting your pieces on nice places for 20 or so moves, leading often to almost symetrical positions. I love d4 as white though, I am always move ahead
  13. 07 Jan '08 17:51
    Originally posted by ivan2908
    I am annoyed to play against 1. d4 because there is SO MUCH theory... And since it is not open like 1. e4 it is basically adjusting your pieces on nice places for 20 or so moves, leading often to almost symetrical positions...
    *Ahem*
    Game 4150707
  14. 07 Jan '08 23:48
    Benko Gambit !!
  15. 08 Jan '08 01:36 / 2 edits
    I suggest that you take a look at an aggressive "defense" that was once the main "anti-d4" weapon of super-GM Morozovich: The Chigorin Defense (1 d4 d5 2 c4 Nc6). This defense is recommended by IM Gary Lane in his recent book, "Ideas Behind Modern Chess Openings: Black."

    Edit: A brand new book by IM Christoph Wisenewski called "Play 1...Nc6" also advocates the Chigorin Defense. (Even though the title of the book is "Play 1...Nc6", against 1 d4 Wisenewski recommends playing 1...d5 first, then play 2...Nc6.)