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  1. 26 Sep '07 05:34
    http://www.101chesstips.com/the-power-of-the-pawn.jsp
  2. 27 Sep '07 19:51
    Originally posted by Ice Cold
    http://www.101chesstips.com/the-power-of-the-pawn.jsp
    well, I'm not an expert in chess, but I don't think this is the way to learn it for beginners. the 101 tips look so lame.
  3. 27 Sep '07 20:08
    Originally posted by Ice Cold
    http://www.101chesstips.com/the-power-of-the-pawn.jsp
    One of the first things that I do when visiting a new web site is read any information about who runs the site. (Usually in the "About Us" link.) I like to know the credentials of the people behind the site. This site has absolutely no information about the people, other than a copyright notice. So the visitor doesn't know anything about the person's credentials or reputation, and he has no idea where this information came from. Is it original content, or was it "borrowed" from other sources? And if it's original content, was it written by a chess master or a 800 elo beginner? You have no idea.

    I think I'll pass on this one. (Besides, the other poster was right, there doesn't seem to be anything special about the content there.)
  4. 28 Sep '07 05:52
    I guess I'd have to disagree. While the tips on the site are not necessarily anything special, there are quite a few there that I can remember when I 'got' them and how it improved my game. I remember first realizing that the fact that pawns can never go back means that there are two squares they can never guard again. Suddenly it was like a new game. That was fun.

    Plus I like the fact that it's all plaintext.
  5. 28 Sep '07 09:51
    Agreed...it may not be original but it's all bite sized tips, easy to dip into and accessible language...not looked over it thoroughly but I don't have a problem with it.
  6. 28 Sep '07 10:34
    Originally posted by Ice Cold
    http://www.101chesstips.com/the-power-of-the-pawn.jsp
    Thanks this will really be a great help as I am currently trying to teach my god daughter to play chess. I find it hard to teach in a methodical way. So far I have covered openings (generally), engames i.e. KR vK, Kp v K but I am struggling to teach is a balanced way. This site will help make sure that I do not miss anything.
  7. 28 Sep '07 10:55
    Originally posted by stevetodd
    Thanks this will really be a great help as I am currently trying to teach my god daughter to play chess. I find it hard to teach in a methodical way. So far I have covered openings (generally), engames i.e. KR vK, Kp v K but I am struggling to teach is a balanced way. This site will help make sure that I do not miss anything.
    If you let me know your goddaughters age I'll be happy to share some tips I've picked up from teaching my own kids...pm me if you prefer. Also www.chesskids.com is packed with useful stuff for kids, parents and teachers.
  8. 28 Sep '07 11:23
    Originally posted by Mahout
    If you let me know your goddaughters age I'll be happy to share some tips I've picked up from teaching my own kids...pm me if you prefer. Also www.chesskids.com is packed with useful stuff for kids, parents and teachers.
    probably better here as we might attract others in the same boat, she is 9 and has been playing a few months in her school chess club.
  9. 28 Sep '07 12:00
    there's another one - chessforkids.com
  10. 28 Sep '07 12:39
    OK first thing is good luck...there are a few pitfalls.

    A bit of planning and preperation on your part will go a long way. Here is a hotch potch of ideas based on my own experience:

    Keep the "instruction time" short and present just one or two ideas. Typically kids will want to get on with a game and will glaze over quite quickly if you overdo the instruction...although kids differ in how they prefer to learn...so if you can spot a preffered learning style then go more with this....avoid a time when she is tired.

    With learning style...some kids like being shown things..watching you, listening and taking it in..many prefer to try things them selves..experimenting. Always encourage.

    Suppose your doing opening training instead of saying..1.e4 is a good opening move because blah blah blah...try asking: "What do you think a good move for white?"..."OK"..."why's "that?"..."what would happen if" (useful phrase that one) "what would happen if you moved that one so the bishop could come out and fight..?" "Yes right" "Good"...the words of encouragement are very powerful.. ...never say no...just say OK or yes in a mildly questioning tone...or ask "can you find a better one?"

    Letting them discover is generally more memorable than them being told. Also - just because you said it doesn't mean they have learned it. Re- caps and repetitions are good. Sum up at the end..."so today you've learned how to...etc." It's good to to make up little rymes and ditties and play around...start the next session with a re-cap of what was done in the previous one.

    A lot also depends on what the school chess club is like...is it just a supervised area where kids play or is there some instruction...and who is giving this. But the cool thing is she''ll quickly move up the ranking if she gets some structured coaching.

    Once you have setting up the board and the piece moves nailed you can move onto a few opening moves...there are arguments for and against using the Gioucco Piano here...but it follows basic principles and it's relatively easy to learn.

    Now checkmate with two rooks...this can be a game with you defending...getting faster and faster.

    Checkmate with one rook + king...this too can become a game.

    Checkmate with Queen + king.

    Knight moves...spread a few chocolate buttons (with parents permission) on the board and have her win them by moving the knight to capture them.

    Knight moves 2 - As above but put a few same colour pawns on the board to make it harder.

    Re-enforce things with a puzzle...such as setting up the board the wrong way and playing spot the mistake.

    Now you can set up a basic puzzle or two...say showing back rank checkmate or one with a pawn on the seventh rank (where it promotes to give checkmate)....beware of taking to much time setting up puzzles...it might be worth printing a few (you can set up the board in Fritz and print it).

    And then on to tactics...

    Very important to keep a careful eye on her to spot signs of boredom...try to finish the lesson with her wanting more...this is an advantage you have over a paid coach who has to complete the hour session.

    "Discovering Chess Opening" by John Emms has some very good stuff on the first few moves which I think would be a good guide for you to use (it's not written for kids) to get some ideas for teaching a lesson on say...scholars mate...all kids have to learn to do this so they can defend against it...it's good too on principles.

    There are three books/pamphlets written by a primary school teacher:

    "Tens Ways to Succeed in the Opening" (or Middlegame or Ending) by Tim Onions and David Regis - they are excellent and at £5 each I highly recommend all three.


    You might also look at "Winning Chess Puzzles for Kids" by Jeff Croakley...it has some mate in one puzzles, mate in twos, tatics and some quiz questions where the king and queen are the wrong way round etc.

    As well as www.chesskids.com mentioned in the previous post it might be worth checking out Susan Polgars website..not reviewed this myself but I know she has kids and has made some training materials for them...however I would definitely review any dvd's before buying them...chessmaster has cool stuff for kids starting out... although my kids were never into playing chess on a computer.

    Also "How to Beat Your Dad at Chess" and "Chess Tactics for Kids" despite the title and friendly cover aren't really suitable for kids starting out (in my opinion anyway)...they are good books but for maybe after a year or so when they are happy reading notation.

    That's about it...
  11. 28 Sep '07 21:55
    Originally posted by Ice Cold
    http://www.101chesstips.com/the-power-of-the-pawn.jsp
    It's called 101 Chess tips and inside there are 93? Go figure