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  1. 19 Jun '08 14:18
    Do I use it as a coaster, or do I set up a board and do the moves? How do you use it?
  2. 19 Jun '08 14:28
    Originally posted by CreepingDeath
    Do I use it as a coaster, or do I set up a board and do the moves? How do you use it?
    Cardoza Publishing use quite thick gauge, soft paper in their books.
    Thus, pretty much anything by Eric Schiller makes quite pleasant material to wipe your arse with.
  3. Standard member Talisman
    Time traveller.
    19 Jun '08 14:28
    Originally posted by CreepingDeath
    Do I use it as a coaster, or do I set up a board and do the moves? How do you use it?
    Judging by your profile, i'd say a coaster!
  4. 19 Jun '08 16:34
    It was a serious question. I honestly am asking the best way to learn from it.
  5. 19 Jun '08 16:36
    Originally posted by CreepingDeath
    It was a serious question. I honestly am asking the best way to learn from it.
    Ok. This depends. What type of chess books?
    Tactics, strategy, openings, annotated games...
  6. 19 Jun '08 17:54 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by CreepingDeath
    It was a serious question. I honestly am asking the best way to learn from it.
    study each position like it's the position you've got in one of your games. just don't be vague and lazy about it, and even further always write down the move you would play in that position, so that you don't "cheat" to yourself (like, "yeeeaah, I had thought about thaat moove!).
  7. 20 Jun '08 13:59
    For things like annotated games, what diskamyl said. I look at each position then spend some time working out what my assessment of the position is and what move I would make. Then read the next part of the annotation. Reading straight through the game and following the moves is enjoyable but I suspect I learn far less.

    Actually this approach works for tactics and strategy books too. It takes a lot longer to get through the book, but I think it is more fruitful an approach.

    Well, that's my 5c worth anyway.
  8. Standard member ivan2908
    SelfProclaimedTitler
    20 Jun '08 14:19
    Originally posted by Deece
    For things like annotated games, what diskamyl said. I look at each position then spend some time working out what my assessment of the position is and what move I would make. Then read the next part of the annotation. Reading straight through the game and following the moves is enjoyable but I suspect I learn far less.

    Actually this approach works for tact ...[text shortened]... ough the book, but I think it is more fruitful an approach.

    Well, that's my 5c worth anyway.
    I agree but I found it extremly difficult to go trough the book that way. I think if say 1500 picks up some excellent strategy book for example (Like Reasses your chess or so) and learn by that approach, it will last a year maybe to "read" (understand all in the book) but your knowledge will benefit extremly. Mental discipline was always the most important thing... And it is not easy to be disciplined....
  9. 22 Jun '08 12:46
    Funny you should mention one of Silman's books. I am getting Reassess your Chess soon and going through it in the way I describe probably will take a year. Should be useful though.
  10. 22 Jun '08 15:02
    Sleep with it under your pillow, it'll sink in by osmosis.
  11. 22 Jun '08 21:13 / 1 edit
    You can find websites where you can download the pgn files of games in well known books so you can import them in your favorite chess program and not need a board. I find this a bit easier since you don't have to re-position the board all the time, and you can save the variations and go over them later without the book, perhaps. I have a laptop so I can be mobile too. I also set up a board sometimes, because it is fun and a good way to visualize and learn, imho. Little magnetic sets are great for this as well. I guess it matters on the time you have and your preference, and the type of books. With some tactics books you don't need a board because the position is in the book and you can solve it from the book. Going over annotated master games you would definitley need a board or computer.
  12. Standard member Scriabin
    Done Asking
    25 Jun '08 02:09
    It has been a long long time since I bought a chess book, let alone opened one I already had. I now regret giving most of them away for the last charity book sale. But I kept one I simply cannot bring myself to part from: Horowitz' 1964 edition of Chess Openings. I remember pouring through what seemed like thousands of lines and still not really covering even half the conventional openings. I still find it interesting and I've got so many little margin notes and so forth I got to keep it, even if it probably is way out of date and so much has happened since.

    And it is like 789 pages and was $8.95 --

    If there is a single, favorite, well-thumbed chess book you folks hang onto for whatever reason, tell me which book and why you still have it? I know, I know, some of you will make some very bad jokes, but pls try to save us some time here and just answer the question.