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  1. Standard member vivify
    rain
    18 Sep '12 08:28 / 2 edits
    Can anyone recommend a site or blog, that not only lists opening moves, but also shows why they're used? I don't get opening theory, other than that there are four center squares that are helpful if you get "control" of.

    For example, I'll often see players open with 1.C4. Why? What advantage does this position have? To me, it just seems like you're throwing a pawn out into the wilderness with no protection.

    Thanks for your help.
  2. 18 Sep '12 08:48
    Hey,

    I think openings require a lot of work/study. You have to test all lines yourself to understand them. Of course books/blogs/movies can help with that, but at some point they will 'forget' to mention a move you find logic and then you're stuck again.

    1. c4 is not so silly:
    - It attacks d5 (in the center).
    - It may make black feel uncomfortable, because he doesn't know how to handle.
    - You say it's a lonely, unprotected pawn. Well, in order for black to attack it, he will have to move his pawns/pieces accordingly, thereby neglecting the center.
    - When it transposes to more common openings, you may have avoided more complicated opening lines.
    - It can be protected with e3/e4, d3, b3 or Qc2/Qa4 (sounds bad) if really needed.
  3. 18 Sep '12 09:11 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by vivify
    Can anyone recommend a site or blog, that not only lists opening moves, but also shows why they're used? I don't get opening theory, other than that there are four center squares that are helpful if you get "control" of.

    For example, I'll often see players open with 1.C4. Why? What advantage does this position have? To me, it just seems like you're throwing a pawn out into the wilderness with no protection.

    Thanks for your help.
    my good man, look no further, check out my profile it has links to all of these, ideas behind 1.c4 that you can understand, the importance of the center for conducting an attack, etc etc, do not be put off by the somewhat esoteric titles, the content is readily accessible and easy to understand, wish you well, regards Robbie.

    http://www.timeforchess.com/profile/playerprofile.php
  4. Standard member vivify
    rain
    18 Sep '12 09:46 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    my good man, look no further, check out my profile it has links to all of these, ideas behind 1.c4 that you can understand, the importance of the center for conducting an attack, etc etc, do not be put off by the somewhat esoteric titles, the content is readily accessible and easy to understand, wish you well, regards Robbie.

    http://www.timeforchess.com/profile/playerprofile.php
    Thanks SO much. You have no idea how much this'll help me.

    And tvochess, thanks for your explanation. That makes C4 seem a lot more legitimate, and threatening as well.
  5. 18 Sep '12 10:12 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by vivify
    Thanks SO much. You have no idea how much this'll help me.

    And tvochess, thanks for your explanation. That makes C4 seem a lot more legitimate, and threatening as well.
    You are most welcome, if you are going to play 1.c4, may i suggest English GM Tony Kostens book, The dynamic English. It aspires to avoid most theory, yet still to give white great chances against all setups and includes both strategic ideas and practical games. The English is good, but its positional, which is not to everyone's taste, wish you well - regards Robbie.
  6. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    18 Sep '12 13:28 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by vivify
    Can anyone recommend a site or blog, that not only lists opening moves, but also shows why they're used? I don't get opening theory, other than that there are four center squares that are helpful if you get "control" of.

    For example, I'll often see players open with 1.C4. Why? What advantage does this position have? To me, it just seems like you're throwing a pawn out into the wilderness with no protection.

    Thanks for your help.
    You might like to look at some videos on Youtube explaining the openings. The following is one on the English Opening:

    YouTube

    And don't forget the Synnetrical Defense to the English Opening

    YouTube