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  1. 29 Dec '08 19:29
    Ok so say I have all of the book moves memorized. How do I capitalize when my opponent steps out of book? Do I look at what the book move should have been and seen what that squares they should have controlled?
  2. 29 Dec '08 20:10
    Originally posted by kmac27
    How do I capitalize when my opponent steps out of book?
    I think just as important as memorizing a sequence of moves is to understand the pawn structure, positional features, and tactical possibilities in any certain opening. Each opening has strengths and weaknesses and you get the most out of an opening by knowing where your chances lie (Kingside or Queenside; middle game piece play or endgame pawn structure; open or closed center). Any odd move played against you should be checked as a possible blunder and certainly look out for any tactics behind it. Next look at how the opponent's move helps or hinders your overall plan for the opening. Can you keep playing with the general strategy of the opening or do you need to change direction?
  3. 29 Dec '08 20:15
    Originally posted by kmac27
    ...How do I capitalize when my opponent steps out of book?...
    PANIC!!!
    Is usually my first instinct for some reason.
  4. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    29 Dec '08 21:13
    Originally posted by kmac27
    Ok so say I have all of the book moves memorized. How do I capitalize when my opponent steps out of book? Do I look at what the book move should have been and seen what that squares they should have controlled?
    well, now you start it over again, and this time learn WHY the other moves were inferior.
  5. 29 Dec '08 21:20
    Just because an opponent leaves book, this does not mean that the opponent has done something wrong that can be punished. Just look at the new position and see if something was left vulnerable. If you don't see anything, then continue to develop your pieces in a way that now seems best. In other words, it is time to play chess.

    I don't think you are going to find any step by step information about why this book move is best and why all other moves suck in comparison. So once your opponent leaves book, all you can do is what seems right and learn from any mistakes.
  6. 29 Dec '08 21:27
    You play chess.
  7. 30 Dec '08 07:00
    Memorizing moves does not really make sense. This will only enable you to play halve a chess game without losing (assumption is that you follow a solid line and haven't memorized a line that leads to a lost game). What you need to do is buy some chess books that explain to you why you make certain moves. Why is it important to develop your pieces. What are the important squares? Et cetera. Unless you do not understand (at a certain level) what you are doing and why, learning a chess opening is a waste of time.
    So, if you opponent choses to go out-of-book, you should try to assess his position (and your own). Sometimes the best move is just to place a piece on a important square.
  8. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    30 Dec '08 07:37 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by kmac27
    Ok so say I have all of the book moves memorized. How do I capitalize when my opponent steps out of book? Do I look at what the book move should have been and seen what that squares they should have controlled?
    Sort of. Ideally, you try and understand the strategy behind the book moves before playing them. A non-book move is not necessarily a mistake - some lines are just not popular, or not as ambitious as the main lines.
  9. 30 Dec '08 08:55
    his move is a strong novelty that you do not know because you do not have the latest updated database...
  10. 30 Dec '08 17:44
    Sometimes things can go terribly wrong for your opponent if they step out of book.
  11. 30 Dec '08 18:39
    at my level of play my game is very solid. I played a terrible opening and had a master in a drawn position, but before trading to a draw time ran out. BTW this was only a half hour game. He told me my opening was terrible an my play was strong. I just needed to learn more theory and I would be at a much higher level than I currently am at.
  12. 30 Dec '08 19:01
    Originally posted by kmac27
    at my level of play my game is very solid. I played a terrible opening and had a master in a drawn position, but before trading to a draw time ran out. BTW this was only a half hour game. He told me my opening was terrible an my play was strong. I just needed to learn more theory and I would be at a much higher level than I currently am at.
    are you using databases here ?
    if not, try to use them and learn openings while playing and become a master...
    if yes, your play is not yet strong enough for a master even with openings knowledge...
  13. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    30 Dec '08 19:04
    Originally posted by kmac27
    at my level of play my game is very solid. I played a terrible opening and had a master in a drawn position, but before trading to a draw time ran out. BTW this was only a half hour game. He told me my opening was terrible an my play was strong. I just needed to learn more theory and I would be at a much higher level than I currently am at.
    can you post the game?
  14. 31 Dec '08 02:08
    I must warn you my opening was crap. First time I played against the four pawns attack and I had never seen a game of this variation from black. Time limit was 30 minutes, but I've played against this guy before and he didn't take more than 20 minutes in an hour long game with me. I ran into time trouble so this is where I stopped. But as you can see I somehow didn't lose positionally, just on time.

    Black me uscf 1619
    White 2300 master.


    1. d4 Nf6
    2. c4 g6
    3. Nc3 Bg7
    4. e4 d6
    5. f4 O-O
    6. Nf3 Ne8
    7. Be2 f5
    8. e5 Na6
    9. O-O c5
    10. d5 Rb8
    11. Be3 Nac7
    12. a4 b6
    13. Qd2 Na6
    14. Nb5 Rb7
    15. a5 Bd7
    16. axb6 Qxb6
    17. Rfc1 Nec7
    18. Nxc7 Nxc7
    19. Ra2 Rfb8
    20. Rca1 a6
    21. Bd1 Qb4
    22. Qxb4 Rxb4
    23. b3 Bc8
    24. Bd2 R4b6
    25. Ba5 R6b7
    26. Bc2 g5
    27. exd6 exd6
    28. Re1 g4
    29. Nh4 Bd4+
    30. Kf1 Kf7
    31. Bxf5 Bxf5
    32. Nxf5 Ne8
    33. Nxd4 cxd4
    34. b4 Rc8
  15. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    31 Dec '08 13:43 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by kmac27
    I must warn you my opening was crap. First time I played against the four pawns attack and I had never seen a game of this variation from black. Time limit was 30 minutes, but I've played against this guy before and he didn't take more than 20 minutes in an hour long game with me. I ran into time trouble so this is where I stopped. But as you can see I someho 8. Re1 g4
    29. Nh4 Bd4+
    30. Kf1 Kf7
    31. Bxf5 Bxf5
    32. Nxf5 Ne8
    33. Nxd4 cxd4
    34. b4 Rc8
    I only looked quickly through the game, and I don't have that much experience on kid, but I think opening was the least of your problems.

    you let your pieces get stuck on the queenside, almost losing. your mobility got almost worse than on move 1! then you made it worse by launching a kingside pawn storm with absolutely nothing to back it up with. that's a sure loss, white will just swing back and crash in. then you lost queenside pawns which was another loss, white can now queen on either side without much trouble. with bare kings you might be able to draw on kingside, but both sides no way. I don't think there was any realistic way to save that game when your flag fell. white will force some exchanges and queen, black has no counter threats.