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  1. Standard member Thequ1ck
    Fast above
    15 Aug '12 12:55
    Suppose you are playing 2 people of much higher rating than yourself.

    You play one as black and the other as white.

    You then copy responses from one game to the other, effectively acting as
    a middle-man between the two players.

    You will inevitably win one of the games and thereby increase your rating.
  2. 15 Aug '12 12:59
    http://www.chessbase.com/newsprint.asp?newsid=4555
  3. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    15 Aug '12 13:06 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Thequ1ck
    You will inevitably win one of the games and thereby increase your rating.
    I assume that you refuse all draw offers? But they could still play down to insufficient mating material.
  4. 15 Aug '12 13:46
    Originally posted by SwissGambit
    I assume that you refuse all draw offers? But they could still play down to insufficient mating material.
    Two draws against much higher rated players will also increase the rating of the cheater.
  5. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    15 Aug '12 13:51
    Originally posted by WanderingKing
    Two draws against much higher rated players will also increase the rating of the cheater.
    Yes, I know. I was just pointing out that a win is not inevitable.
  6. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    15 Aug '12 14:17
    Originally posted by SwissGambit
    Yes, I know. I was just pointing out that a win is not inevitable.
    Especially if the two GM's knew about the scam and could see the moves on both boards. Of course you could do that with two computers two, you could even get a higher rating since the best ones are rated in the 3000's.
  7. 16 Aug '12 11:59
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Especially if the two GM's knew about the scam and could see the moves on both boards. Of course you could do that with two computers two, you could even get a higher rating since the best ones are rated in the 3000's.
    And the two GMs will know about this scam, because it's so old that it was (according to Weinstein, anyway) once played on Lasker and Capablanca. Anyone who falls for this is simply not paying attention.

    Richard
  8. Standard member Thabtos
    I am become Death
    17 Aug '12 20:29
    I've never done this, but a good way to trick an inexperienced opponent is to place one of his captured pieces behind the clock. Beginners have a bad habit of counting material off the board, and if they think they are a piece up based on the piece count off the table, they sometimes decide to sacrifice an extra piece they don't have.
  9. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    18 Aug '12 03:57
    Originally posted by Shallow Blue
    And the two GMs will know about this scam, because it's so old that it was (according to Weinstein, anyway) once played on Lasker and Capablanca. Anyone who falls for this is simply not paying attention.

    Richard
    You could pit a GM on one site against a GM on another site. Unless they thought to check the positions in the games of strong players on other prominent chess sites, how would they find out who they were really playing?
  10. 18 Aug '12 13:50
    Originally posted by SwissGambit
    You could pit a GM on one site against a GM on another site. Unless they thought to check the positions in the games of strong players on other prominent chess sites, how would they find out who they were really playing?
    That would work (and is probably how the Lasker/Capablanca game was played - it was a correspondence one), but it wouldn't work if you first advertised that you were going to "draw" against two GMs, as Derren Brown had to do. So I still wonder how it's possible that his victims fell for it.

    Richard
  11. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    18 Aug '12 15:06
    Originally posted by Shallow Blue
    That would work (and is probably how the Lasker/Capablanca game was played - it was a correspondence one), but it wouldn't work if you first advertised that you were going to "draw" against two GMs, as Derren Brown had to do. So I still wonder how it's possible that his victims fell for it.

    Richard
    I thought Derren Brown mixed it up a bit by giving a simul against 9 opponents to mask the fact that it was really a 4 v. 4 match with him as the move courier. He played a legitimate game against the weakest of the 9 to alleviate suspicion.

    Still, any of the GMs with prior knowledge of this trick had to know it was being used against them. Savvy simul-givers insist on playing white in every game specifically to avoid this trick.