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  1. 13 May '09 19:55
    And I'd like to post it for analysis, although it's probably not a very good game to analyze. It would be better to post a loss and in this match my opponent blundered a lot.

    But I'd also like to post it so I can learn (how) to do it. I've seen others do it where you can click "next" and follow through the game.
  2. Standard member MCA
    TokerSmurf
    13 May '09 20:03 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by USArmyParatrooper
    And I'd like to post it for analysis, although it's probably not a very good game to analyze. It would be better to post a loss and in this match my opponent blundered a lot.

    But I'd also like to post it so I can learn (how) to do it. I've seen others do it where you can click "next" and follow through the game.
    funny - i was just looking at it after reading your other thread

    i wont analyse it properly (since i suck at chess) but you played some good moves and finished it off well with the rook pin

    congrats on your first win

    [edit] and welcome to the site too [/edit]
  3. 13 May '09 20:03
    At the bottom , Insert link to game and add the game no.
  4. Standard member MCA
    TokerSmurf
    13 May '09 20:06 / 2 edits
    just to clarify

    when you are writing your post you can click the "insert link to a game" link below the POST button and then enter the game number (found in the address bar when viewing the game itself)

    if you want to display the full game with the "play" buttons then you need to get the PGN from the game. if you click "reply and quote" on a post which has the full board you will see how it looks.
  5. Standard member thesonofsaul
    King of the Ashes
    13 May '09 20:39
    And you can get the pgn from the My Games list when you click on "info" (directly to the right of the last move date column).
  6. 13 May '09 20:49 / 1 edit
    Dada! USArmyParatroopers first game!

  7. 14 May '09 00:29
    Hi Mate,

    Good to get the first win tucked away.

    6 Bh6 instead of moving a developed piece again the opening
    wins you the f8 Bishop and most likely your opponent would
    have resigned there and then.

    No blunders from you which bades well for the future.

    After 6.Bh6 if your opponent did not resign or spotted the mate then
    your game could have gone something like this.



    If your opponent is going to give you pieces use it as a chance
    to brush up on your tactcis and look for sharp snappy finishes.
  8. 14 May '09 09:21 / 1 edit
    let me try this again
  9. 14 May '09 09:27
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    [b]Hi Mate,

    Good to get the first win tucked away.

    6 Bh6 instead of moving a developed piece again the opening
    wins you the f8 Bishop and most likely your opponent would
    have resigned there and then.

    No blunders from you which bades well for the future.

    After 6.Bh6 if your opponent did not resign or spotted the mate then
    your game could have gone something like this.
    Yeah, I thought about Bh6 but I had started to get worried. I felt my opponent was too quick to give up his rook and when he moved out the knight my Queen was immobilized. I was worried I might be getting sucked into a trap so I started thinking defensively.
  10. 14 May '09 10:28 / 1 edit
    test

  11. 14 May '09 11:49 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by USArmyParatrooper
    Yeah, I thought about Bh6 but I had started to get worried. I felt my opponent was too quick to give up his rook and when he moved out the knight my Queen was immobilized. I was worried I might be getting sucked into a trap so I started thinking defensively.
    " I felt my opponent was too quick to give up his rook."

    Too quick to give up a Rook.
    That was five moves - a lot of Rooks go in 4 moves.



    Never underestimate an opponent is good advice.
    But over-estimating an opponent can also be bad play.

    You moved a develop piece twice in the opening chasing a harmless pawn.
    You could have develop a piece threatening checkmate and
    winning a Bishop with check.

    Sorry to labour the point but bad habits have to be squished as
    soon as they appear else they can take years to erase.

    One skill you will develop as a chess player is determing the difference
    between a trap and a blunder.

    If your first thought was Bh6 then trust your instinct.
  12. 14 May '09 11:58 / 1 edit
    you know pawn dude, this move sequence, 1.e4 2.Qh5 has been used by none other than GM Nakamura against other grandmasters, is it not awesome!
  13. 14 May '09 12:30 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    you know pawn dude, this move sequence, 1.e4 2.Qh5 has been used by none other than GM Nakamura against other grandmasters, is it not awesome!
    Edit: Disregard, I misread your post.

    Edit a second time. You were talking about green's example. I remember like a year ago someone played that against me and got me with it. I can't imagine GM's playing with that opening because it's easily thwarted and IMO it doesn't set you up very well.
  14. 14 May '09 14:08
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    you know pawn dude, this move sequence, 1.e4 2.Qh5 has been used by none other than GM Nakamura against other grandmasters, is it not awesome!
    Hi.

    Remember it's GM Nakamura.

    When you are over 2200 then you can mess about a bit in the opening
    'cos you will have a good idea how to get out of awkward situations.

    Until that happy day arrives, just you ignore what the clever guys are up to.