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  1. 22 May '07 03:38
    Yeah. It really bugs me. I get so nervous before and during I play. And when I play, I can see that I am better than the opponent and suddenly I make a blunder just because I'm so nervous.

    Any advice on this guys?? I really need to improve my tournament play. ^_^'
  2. Standard member irontigran
    Rob Scheider is..
    22 May '07 03:40
    hide from the real world with us we have saved you a spot...
  3. 22 May '07 03:44
    Originally posted by jvanhine
    hide from the real world with us we have saved you a spot...
    hehe..

    I guess I should be less fearful of who I play with.

    Thats why computers play good coz they never fear.
  4. 22 May '07 03:57
    Originally posted by pawndevourer
    Yeah. It really bugs me. I get so nervous before and during I play. And when I play, I can see that I am better than the opponent and suddenly I make a blunder just because I'm so nervous.

    Any advice on this guys?? I really need to improve my tournament play. ^_^'
    Play CC.
  5. 22 May '07 04:46
    Originally posted by pawndevourer
    Yeah. It really bugs me. I get so nervous before and during I play. And when I play, I can see that I am better than the opponent and suddenly I make a blunder just because I'm so nervous.

    Any advice on this guys?? I really need to improve my tournament play. ^_^'
    I've had that happen before to me, just dont worry about who they are, dont even write there rating down just look at the board and play chess, if there a GM just play and see how the game goes once you start thinking about the result and whats going to happen and who they are then your mental toughness drops and you lose very quickly.

    I think it is something you just gradually build by playing more tournament games and when you train at home, they both give you playing experience and confidence.
  6. 22 May '07 13:23
    Originally posted by bunta
    I've had that happen before to me, just dont worry about who they are, dont even write there rating down just look at the board and play chess, if there a GM just play and see how the game goes once you start thinking about the result and whats going to happen and who they are then your mental toughness drops and you lose very quickly.

    I think it is someth ...[text shortened]... rnament games and when you train at home, they both give you playing experience and confidence.
    Yes, don't let your fears become a self-fulfilling prophecy. Respect your opponent, but never fear them. They are human just like you. Albeit, they may be a much better chess-playing human. In which case, force them to prove they are better than you. If you sit down with a defeatist attitude, then you will lose more often than not. It's like the old saying goes, "If you fear injury, injury will find you."
  7. Standard member Fleabitten
    Love thy bobblehead
    22 May '07 14:02
    Originally posted by pawndevourer
    Yeah. It really bugs me. I get so nervous before and during I play. And when I play, I can see that I am better than the opponent and suddenly I make a blunder just because I'm so nervous.

    Any advice on this guys?? I really need to improve my tournament play. ^_^'
    At the beginning of every game remind yourself that it doesn't matter who the opponent is, because the game starts from the same position with the same material each and every time.
  8. 22 May '07 20:16
    I have to say that every time I've played against a woman or a child I've been intimidated because of a visceral assumption that if either is playing in a tournament she or he must be a phenomenal player, or a weak player playing because of a boyfriend or parent also in the tournament. A sexist/ageist assumption on my part that neither could just be a normal player like the rest of us who simply enjoys the game.

    As a kid I was raised in SF and often had my ass kicked by Asian players. I beat some of them too, but for some reason I came away with the feeling, again irrational, that Asians are inherently better at the game.

    Then again, my Korean adoptive son is playing very good chess at age 5, and it seemed very easy to teach him.
  9. 22 May '07 20:23 / 1 edit
    Be strong. Be brave. Do not fear defeat, embrace it.
  10. 22 May '07 20:30
    I should note that when I play over the board I bring headphones and listen to classical music to soothe the nerves. Just make sure it's not loud enough for your opponent or other players to hear it.