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  1. Standard member irontigran
    Rob Scheider is..
    02 Dec '09 05:21
    check this out-

    http://www.chessvideos.tv/forum/viewtopic.php?t=3547

    Im not sure if this tactic has a name, but it is commonly missed in the endgame. First time I saw it was in a tactics book that supplied only a few of these situations (as much as perpetual check) and normally you wont even see this in a tactics book.

    so for all the beginners out there trying to learn 100 openings I suggest watching the video.
  2. Standard member randolph
    the walrus
    02 Dec '09 06:24
    OMG YOUR BACK
  3. 02 Dec '09 08:14
    To save everyone watching an eight minute video, here's the tactic:


    Black to play and lose!

    Solution (with White playing 1. g3 to start with to get round it having to be White's move in PGNs posted here):
  4. Standard member orion25
    Art is hard
    02 Dec '09 13:44
    Originally posted by Fat Lady
    To save everyone watching an eight minute video, here's the tactic:

    [fen]8/1pp5/p7/P4kp1/1P6/5KP1/8/8 b - - 0 1[/fen]
    Black to play and lose!

    Solution (with White playing 1. g3 to start with to get round it having to be White's move in PGNs posted here):
    [pgn]
    [Result "0-1"]
    [FEN "8/1pp5/p7/P4kp1/1P6/5K2/6P1/8 w - - 0 1"]
    [SetUp "1"]
    1. g3 b6 2. b5 axb5 3. a6 b4 4. a7 b3 5. a8=Q b2 6. Qa2 0-1
    [/pgn]
    In Silman's complete endgame course we find:



    Black to move wins:



    White wins if he has the move, with b3, as well.
  5. 02 Dec '09 16:46 / 2 edits
    Old news - see item 321 (6 August 2006) & 322

    http://www.xs4all.nl/~timkr/chess2/diary_17.htm
  6. 02 Dec '09 17:10 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by heinzkat
    Old news - see item 321 (6 August 2006) & 322

    http://www.xs4all.nl/~timkr/chess2/diary_17.htm
    Wow, that really is amazing! I'm going to print that article and study it every day for the next week until the tactic is burnt into my brain.
  7. Standard member irontigran
    Rob Scheider is..
    02 Dec '09 17:29
    Originally posted by Fat Lady
    To save everyone watching an eight minute video, here's the tactic:

    [fen]8/1pp5/p7/P4kp1/1P6/5KP1/8/8 b - - 0 1[/fen]
    Black to play and lose!

    Solution (with White playing 1. g3 to start with to get round it having to be White's move in PGNs posted here):
    [pgn]
    [Result "0-1"]
    [FEN "8/1pp5/p7/P4kp1/1P6/5K2/6P1/8 w - - 0 1"]
    [SetUp "1"]
    1. g3 b6 2. b5 axb5 3. a6 b4 4. a7 b3 5. a8=Q b2 6. Qa2 0-1
    [/pgn]
    thanks! the guy does ramble on and on.. and I have forgot how to put positions up
  8. 02 Dec '09 18:52
    Originally posted by Fat Lady
    To save everyone watching an eight minute video, here's the tactic:

    [fen]8/1pp5/p7/P4kp1/1P6/5KP1/8/8 b - - 0 1[/fen]
    Black to play and lose!

    Solution (with White playing 1. g3 to start with to get round it having to be White's move in PGNs posted here):
    [pgn]
    [Result "0-1"]
    [FEN "8/1pp5/p7/P4kp1/1P6/5K2/6P1/8 w - - 0 1"]
    [SetUp "1"]
    1. g3 b6 2. b5 axb5 3. a6 b4 4. a7 b3 5. a8=Q b2 6. Qa2 0-1
    [/pgn]
    Is .... b5 the move to play?
  9. 02 Dec '09 19:40
    Well it does not lose but the point is the 2 pawn still unusually hold the three pawns. Still, such a waiting move is often critical in an end game.
  10. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    02 Dec '09 22:29
    Hans Kmoch's "Pawn Power in Chess" covers this kind of play in detail. This is old but forgotten, I suspect because opening study is the fashion.

    Funky nomenclature notwithstanding, Kmoch's work is a classic, and well worthy of study. After reading the book, stuff like this will almost pop into your head automatically, even before you consciously calculate anything.

    Paul
  11. Standard member irontigran
    Rob Scheider is..
    02 Dec '09 23:18
    Originally posted by Paul Leggett
    Hans Kmoch's "Pawn Power in Chess" covers this kind of play in detail. This is old but forgotten, I suspect because opening study is the fashion.

    Funky nomenclature notwithstanding, Kmoch's work is a classic, and well worthy of study. After reading the book, stuff like this will almost pop into your head automatically, even before you consciously calculate anything.

    Paul
    never read that, but it sounds great. I agree that this kind of stuff is forgotten with all hundreds and hundreds of opening books each year. players memorize tons of junk to get the "slight edge" but then dont know what to do with it.

    I will have to buy that book.
  12. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    03 Dec '09 00:46
    Originally posted by irontigran
    never read that, but it sounds great. I agree that this kind of stuff is forgotten with all hundreds and hundreds of opening books each year. players memorize tons of junk to get the "slight edge" but then dont know what to do with it.

    I will have to buy that book.
    I highly recommend the algebraic version. He makes up lots of unusual terms to describe various pawn formations and conditions, and they detract a little from his message. To have to read it in descriptive on top of that is a little too much, IMHO.

    The plus is that he is very systematic about pawn structures and the tactics and techniques that go with them, and I promise that you will see the game in a whole new light.

    Paul
  13. 03 Dec '09 00:54
    Originally posted by orion25
    In Silman's complete endgame course we find:

    [fen]6k1/8/6P1/6K1/ppp5/8/PPP5/8 w - - 0 1[/fen]

    Black to move wins:

    [pgn]
    [Event "?"]
    [Site "?"]
    [Date "????.??.??"]
    [Round "?"]
    [White "?"]
    [Black "?"]
    [Result "*"]
    [SetUp "1"]
    [FEN "6k1/8/6P1/6K1/ppp5/8/PPP5/8 w - - 0 1"]

    1. Kf6 b3 2. axb3 c3 3. bxc3 a3 *
    [/pgn]

    White wins if he has the move, with b3, as well.
    Now I am thoroughly confused. In the games where the pawns are on the 4th and 5th ranks, why do they always play hxg4, rather than gxh4?
  14. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    03 Dec '09 12:48
    Originally posted by range blasts
    Now I am thoroughly confused. In the games where the pawns are on the 4th and 5th ranks, why do they always play hxg4, rather than gxh4?
    None of the positions in the thread have pawns on the h-file, could you restate the question?
  15. Standard member orion25
    Art is hard
    03 Dec '09 19:15
    Originally posted by range blasts
    Now I am thoroughly confused. In the games where the pawns are on the 4th and 5th ranks, why do they always play hxg4, rather than gxh4?
    do you mean cxb? the solution is the same: