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  1. 04 Dec '10 17:12
    I enjoy going over annotated games, but find the lengthy variations difficult to follow in my head. It is tedious resetting the board, and often I have to restart the game over after analyzing a variation. In Burgess's The World's Greatest Chess Games he recommends using ChessBase for the above purpose. However ChessBase is expensive (and comes in variously priced packages). Are there other advantages to ChessBase that make it worth the money? Any other suggestions for chess software that would suit my needs? I just purchased Fritz 12 and found a database in it, but so far I have not been able to do anything more than play out the game. Thanks.
  2. Standard member pdunne
    Badmaster
    04 Dec '10 17:22
    For what you say you want to do, I'd say scid would be fine, and it doesn't cost a penny. It's available for Linux, Windows and Mac. More info. here:
    http://scid.sourceforge.net/
    I've been using it for years.
  3. 04 Dec '10 18:08
    Originally posted by pdunne
    For what you say you want to do, I'd say scid would be fine, and it doesn't cost a penny. It's available for Linux, Windows and Mac. More info. here:
    http://scid.sourceforge.net/
    I've been using it for years.
    Thanks pdunne. I have downloaded scid and will give it a try. As far as what I want to do, follow annotated games is my primary aim. However, I am new to chess software, and am not sure of the potential of these programs. I understand the illegitimate use of software to find the best move (cheating if used in an RHP game), but are there legimate advantages to ChessBase that justify the expense? Or is it a program with the most up to date database mainly of interest to serious OTB players who want to track what their opponents are doing?
  4. 04 Dec '10 19:43
    Originally posted by pdunne
    For what you say you want to do, I'd say scid would be fine, and it doesn't cost a penny. It's available for Linux, Windows and Mac. More info. here:
    http://scid.sourceforge.net/
    I've been using it for years.
    Linux-friendly chess database software.

    You just changed my life, sir.
  5. 04 Dec '10 22:58
    Originally posted by Peteruks
    Or is it a program with the most up to date database mainly of interest to serious OTB players who want to track what their opponents are doing?
    Or for serious CC players. But you are right here: unless you are 2400 ELO or above, you don't need chessbase. For opening variations free sites like this one

    http://chessok.com/?page_id=352

    should be just fine.

    If you want to follow annotated games, buy a good book and a wooden chess board. It's less expensive but much more helpful!
  6. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    04 Dec '10 23:09 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by cotoi
    Or for serious CC players. But you are right here: unless you are 2400 ELO or above, you don't need chessbase. For opening variations free sites like this one

    http://chessok.com/?page_id=352

    should be just fine.

    If you want to follow annotated games, buy a good book and a wooden chess board. It's less expensive but much more helpful!
    I tried to download that one with IE and Chrome, neither one found it. Any help?

    I also googled chessok and got a site listed but could not connect, sounds like they are down for a while anyway.
  7. Standard member thesonofsaul
    King of the Ashes
    05 Dec '10 03:44
    Originally posted by Peteruks
    I enjoy going over annotated games, but find the lengthy variations difficult to follow in my head. It is tedious resetting the board, and often I have to restart the game over after analyzing a variation. In Burgess's The World's Greatest Chess Games he recommends using ChessBase for the above purpose. However ChessBase is expensive (and comes in variou ...[text shortened]... se in it, but so far I have not been able to do anything more than play out the game. Thanks.
    It may be tedious resetting the board, but that is so much better for your game than clicking a mouse. I deliberately reset the board to the starting position over and over again when going over a game. Sure, it takes a long time, but the kick to your chess momory and vision is so worth it.

    Just take your time. Keep going over the same game for days, weeks even. Give it the attention it deserves and those positions will lodge in your head.

    Flipping through the moves in the fastest, easiest way possible reaps about as much dividend and speed reading a novel, or perhaps just reading the cliff notes.
  8. 06 Dec '10 05:09
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I tried to download that one with IE and Chrome, neither one found it. Any help?

    I also googled chessok and got a site listed but could not connect, sounds like they are down for a while anyway.
    I guess they were down. I've just checked and it works. The link I gave you is the opening explorer from Chess Assistant database (that's the product competing with chessbase).
  9. 06 Dec '10 10:00
    Hi

    Stay with the book & board. You enjoy playing over annotated games. Good.

    Get yourself a good quality set, something you enjoy playing with and you
    will enjoy it even more. Don't treat it, as some do, a chore that has
    to be done, look forward to it.

    "...but find the lengthy variations difficult to follow in my head."

    An old saying before computers was, "If it's long, it's wrong."
    Game notes should have a diagram preceeding then and be short.
    Chernev's 'Most Instuctive Games.' is just about right.

    Now days writers leave the box running till it's evealuation number hits +1
    and paste in it's moves. This is awful work and a complete waste of space.

    Peteruks, ask some honest good players, nobody plays over these long variations.
  10. Standard member nimzo5
    Ronin
    06 Dec '10 19:17
    OP- It sounds like first thing you should do is get proficient with using fritz 12- entering variations/sub variations etc. I would reccommend googling steve lopez's articles on how to use fritz for some ideas of what you can do.

    I disagree that chessbase is only useful for 2400's- in fact, I think starting working with one it (or aquarium, scid etc.) could start more like 1200. Being fluent with a database program becomes very useful the higher up you go.

    As far as working through annotated games, I agree that for pure chess strength working either in your head or with a board and pieces is the way to go. I like to collect my analysis however so I often have a laptop/board combo. The main thing is to force yourself to do the mental work before you start moving things around.
  11. Standard member Thabtos
    I am become Death
    06 Dec '10 19:55
    I like chessbase because you can create your own databases and it's fairly easy to transfer files through playchess.

    I particularly like the email function as I emailed myself my entire e4 repertoire, which only existed on my laptop, just before my hard drive died.
  12. 06 Dec '10 23:41
    Thanks everyone. I downloaded scid and chessbase lite over the weekend and have started to try them out (someone sent me a message telling me about the free chessbase download). I have to say they reminded me a little of Fritz 12. Clearly I will have to learn more about these programs before they become useful to me. I agree with all the comments about using the real board but, despite Greenpawn's reassurrance, I would like to follow the long variations without having to start the game over later. I wondered about trying a combination of board and laptop, like Nimzo suggested. I will give that a try if my table is big enough. Thanks again.
  13. 07 Dec '10 05:21
    Before computers, people would sometimes use two chess sets when going over annotated games. One chess set to follow the game and another pocket sized chess set for going over the variations. You may want to give that a try if you feel like using a board and pieces instead of a computer.