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  1. 18 Apr '09 17:43 / 1 edit
    Browsing through Müller and Knaak's '222 opening traps after 1.e4'.
    Page 123: 1.e4,e5 2.Nf3,Nc6 3.Bc4,Bc5 4.0-0,d6 5.d3,Nf6 6.Bg5?! Znosko-Borovsky considered this pin to be pointless if hite had already castled.

    Could anyone explain to me why White's castling matters?

  2. 18 Apr '09 17:55
    After a considerably fast think, I came up with this :

    The idea must lie in the fact that 1. ... h6, 2.Bh4 (2.Bxf6 probably isn't that great - giving up the two bishops) g5 3.Bg3 puts the bishop in a bad spot. White would like to play h4 and pressure the loose kingside. Unfortunately, that would weaken white's king. If he were not castled, the rook on h1 would also come to life after h4. Having the king over there and playing h4 would just open lines for black to attack.

    These are my first thoughts.
  3. 18 Apr '09 18:13 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Romanticus
    Browsing through Müller and Knaak's '222 opening traps after 1.e4'.
    Page 123: 1.e4,e5 2.Nf3,Nc6 3.Bc4,Bc5 4.0-0,d6 5.d3,Nf6 6.Bg5?! Znosko-Borovsky considered this pin to be pointless if hite had already castled.

    Could anyone explain to me why White's castling matters?

    [fen]r1bqk2r/ppp2ppp/2np1n2/2b1p1B1/2B1P3/3P1N2/PPP2PPP/RN1Q1RK1 b kq - 0 6[/fen]
    I think black still can 0-0-0. White bishop on g5 may become the a target for further development by black. Taking the pinned knight might be even worst since it will open g file for rooks invention in near future. If white has yet 0-0, black has to take into account that white still has 0-0-0 as an option.
  4. 18 Apr '09 18:35 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Romanticus
    Browsing through Müller and Knaak's '222 opening traps after 1.e4'.
    Page 123: 1.e4,e5 2.Nf3,Nc6 3.Bc4,Bc5 4.0-0,d6 5.d3,Nf6 6.Bg5?! Znosko-Borovsky considered this pin to be pointless if hite had already castled.

    Could anyone explain to me why White's castling matters?

    [fen]r1bqk2r/ppp2ppp/2np1n2/2b1p1B1/2B1P3/3P1N2/PPP2PPP/RN1Q1RK1 b kq - 0 6[/fen]
    Pinski says that after 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.0-0 "is completely toothless, and Black can do as he pleases..." preferring 4.Nc3 Nf6 5.d3 d6 then 6.Bg5 where he comments "in positions like this you can beat even Grandmasters. Obviously before this can happen, they will have to die from boredom..."

    On the whole, Pinski seems to much prefer the Evans Gambit and this is evidenced by his Italian Game and Evans Gambit book containing 83 out of 160 pages devoted to it.
  5. 18 Apr '09 19:13
    Originally posted by Romanticus
    Browsing through Müller and Knaak's '222 opening traps after 1.e4'.
    Page 123: 1.e4,e5 2.Nf3,Nc6 3.Bc4,Bc5 4.0-0,d6 5.d3,Nf6 6.Bg5?! Znosko-Borovsky considered this pin to be pointless if hite had already castled.

    Could anyone explain to me why White's castling matters?

    [fen]r1bqk2r/ppp2ppp/2np1n2/2b1p1B1/2B1P3/3P1N2/PPP2PPP/RN1Q1RK1 b kq - 0 6[/fen]
    This is actually a very instructive opening mistake

    Let the masters from the past show you :
    http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1224575

    The problem with Bg5 is that you invite an attack on your king !
    The moves in that game / trap are not forced of course, but they are so natural that they were repeated many times...i was able to play it twice, one of which was played exactly like in the link, up to the mate !
    it was in a blitz in a bar and i still remember my opponent sitting in shock, thinking that i was some grandmaster !

    i also used this game when i was teaching chess to children. it has great pedagogic value
  6. 18 Apr '09 19:36
    here is the pgn :


    (i chose the chigorin version because dubois-steinitz was not played like that in fact)
  7. 19 Apr '09 01:09 / 2 edits
    Ahh Opening Traps.

    At last a thread I know something about.

    Looks like I'm a tad too late with why castles is dodgy in that position.

    Good to see one of you pulled up a past masters game for the demo.

    "If we study the mistakes of the past, we won't make the same mistake tomorrow."

    Playing over opening traps gives who a whole bucket load of tactical
    ideas because usually it's tactics tactics and more tactics.

    There are such things as positional opening traps but let us stay
    with the tactics.

    As a bonus you pick up your opening principles as a lot of traps
    works because the loser has violated a principle somewhere along
    the line.

    A thing to remember is that all traps that work for Black must
    work for White. Getting rid of that extra tempo without alerting
    your opponent can be awkward.

    The famous Blackburne Shilling Trap.


    Works for White after 1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.a4 Bc5 4.Nd5 etc.etc.
    Try it in a blitz game or two.

    Note if Black plays 3...Bb5 then 4.Nd5 is a Birds reversed v the Lopez.
    and if Black plays 4...Nxd5 then 5....d6. The 6.c3 wins the Bishop.
  8. 19 Apr '09 01:57
    Contined...

    I know that an early castle in the Guico Piano is dodgy so in the
    following game I recently played on here I delayed castling.
    Waited for Black to castle and cooked up this wee trap.

    I've given the main line - the game in question took a slightly
    different (ugly) turn but it was lost. Game 5986145.

    Of course like most aggressive traps it is unsound.

    There are aggressive traps which kick off the game into a tactcial
    melee and these tend to bank on the victim getting lost in a maze.

    The benign trap is a 'safe' trap that just happens to be in the
    position after a natural delveloping move.

    Here is the game.
    I know Black has 'stay at home Queen sacs' in this line where you
    leave the Queen as bait on her home square.

    All I need do then is cook up a wee trap along the same lines as
    Black has in this variation and hope my opponent is not too wary,
    then roll the dice.

    Good Chess this, 'I hope my opponent is not too wary.'

    I think it's the kind of play that has all the masters spinning in their graves.
    ('cept Frank Marshall, he might approve.)

    You can why he goes for it, he thought he was getting a pawn and
    a check on f2 - he never expected me to play Kf1 and win a Queen.

    So I rolled the dice - a double six!

    Korch was so impressed he devoted one his blogs to ithis game.

    http://korch.blogspot.com/search/label/Geoff%20Chandler

    I wonder what he would have said if I had lost it.



    I like a gamble every now and then.

    I follow the signs.

    On the 4th of April (the 4th month) I put £4 on dog No.4 in the 4th race.

    How much did win?

    Nothing. it came in 4th.
  9. 20 Apr '09 04:06
    Thank you all for clearing this up.