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  1. 13 Sep '07 11:49 / 1 edit
    I know that you will find this in books as a win, but is it usually a forced win from a random position???(like p@h2 k@a2 K@e4 N@g6 N@f3 for example)
    Usually in books they just show you the final close to mate where one side gets mated because it can move the pawn...
  2. 13 Sep '07 12:02
    I think it is usually shown as an example of the deeper mysteries of chess...how a knight cannot mate by itself but give the opponent more force in the shape of a pawn and suddenly the knight can bring about checkmate.
  3. 13 Sep '07 12:44
    Originally posted by vipiu
    I know that you will find this in books as a win, but is it usually a forced win from a random position???(like p@h2 k@a2 K@e4 N@g6 N@f3 for example)
    Usually in books they just show you the final close to mate where one side gets mated because it can move the pawn...
    No, it isn't a forced win from any random position, just from certain positions.
  4. 13 Sep '07 14:07
    K+2Ns vs K+p is good for an endgame puzzle but that's when I hit the road. I hate puzzles.
  5. 13 Sep '07 14:19
    Troitzky made extensive analysis on these type of positions - it is usually a win but not if the pawn is too close to promotion. If I can find somewhere an explicit criterion whether a given position with 2N vs P is won or draw (and I believe I have seen something like this in a book), I'll post it here.
  6. 13 Sep '07 15:38
    Ok, there is an article in wikipedia on the topic with the links at the bottom being the most useful: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two_knights_endgame#Second_Troitsky_line
  7. 14 Sep '07 06:26
    nice link, thx...
    so as a general rule if the pawn is blocked in his own half of the board usually there is a win in