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  1. Subscriber sundown316
    The Mighty Messenger
    27 Apr '15 22:12 / 1 edit
    Ended in a rout for Gary 8.5-1.5 Two games at G/25 with a 10 second increment(1.5-0.5 for Kasparov), the remain games at 5/3. Gary won the last 6 games of the match. So, is he planning on returning to competition?
  2. 27 Apr '15 22:31
    8.5-1.5 (see http://theweekinchess.com/chessnews/events/kasparov-vs-short-rapidblitz-in-saint-louis-2015)

    I think it's extremely unlikely that at the age of 52, Kasparov could win his way through the various tournaments and matches necessary to become the official challenger for the World Championship. Of course McArlsen could just ignore FIDE and accept a direct challenge from Kasparov. I consider Kasparov the best chess player in history, but 52 is so old. I'm a couple of years younger than that and I get knackered playing one three hour game every couple of weeks.
  3. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    27 Apr '15 23:54
    Originally posted by Data Fly
    8.5-1.5 (see http://theweekinchess.com/chessnews/events/kasparov-vs-short-rapidblitz-in-saint-louis-2015)

    I think it's extremely unlikely that at the age of 52, Kasparov could win his way through the various tournaments and matches necessary to become the official challenger for the World Championship. Of course McArlsen could just ignore FIDE and accept ...[text shortened]... f years younger than that and I get knackered playing one three hour game every couple of weeks.
    I turn 50 this year, and I am encountering the same issue. I think I am playing better than I ever have OTB, but once a game gets into the 3rd hour I just get mentally fatigued. I usually play in 5 round weekend tournaments, and I have thought about taking strategic byes just to try to stay fresh.
  4. 28 Apr '15 00:40
    Agree Kasparov the greatest player ever, (Fischer a very very close 2nd.)

    64 in June found OTB play very tiring around about 59/60.
    (actually it was the after match drinking which went on sometimes till 5 or 6am that was killing me.)

    Not uncommon to do 2-3 hour shift on the board playing over games at least twice a week,
    I really enjoy doing out, especially if you have a good book, for some reason recently
    I got a real urge and was there for about 5 hours. That Nezhmetdinov see-saw discovery
    came from that sitting. Had a nice tired brain (the kind you get after a game) .

    Still get those tremendous butterflies when I visit a tournament or even a league match.
    Always a good sign. If I got no butterflies then no adrenalin and I played dry.
  5. Subscriber sundown316
    The Mighty Messenger
    28 Apr '15 00:47
    I hit 61 in a week, and I've decided to retire from OTB tournaments. Too stressful, too long, and I get tired in the latter stages of the game.
  6. Subscriber moonbus
    Uber-Nerd
    28 Apr '15 05:19 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sundown316
    I hit 61 in a week, and I've decided to retire from OTB tournaments. Too stressful, too long, and I get tired in the latter stages of the game.
    I'm 60 and find that my calculating-depth has grown shorter with age, compared to my youth, but that my positional judgment has improved. I take heart that Lasker was still competitive well into his 60s.
  7. 28 Apr '15 10:31
    I find it interesting that so many "more mature" players think that their positional chess is better than when they were younger. I feel the same way, though sometimes I wonder if I'm just deluding myself. I definitely had a smaller toolbox (oo er!) when I was in my 20s, but perhaps I was more proficient at using them. Nowadays my head is full of half-understood positional ideas and tactical themes and I often try to shoehorn them into the game when the position doesn't really merit that particular approach.

    As for getting tired after playing long games - my approach for the last couple of seasons has been to play much quicker, often spending just a minute a move for the first twenty moves. This means that I often have no discernible positional advantage, but my brain is still fresh and the advantage on the clocks can lead to blunders from my opponents.

    Thinking about Kasparov's crushing victory over Short again, I realised that they are almost the same age (Short is 50 in June). I wonder if he would have beaten a much younger player (David Howell say) as easily?
  8. 28 Apr '15 11:15
    Hi Data,

    If we both agree Kasparov is the greatest the game has known then you might
    agree I think he would have mashed anybody except Carlsen and Nakamura at blitz.

    If he made a tournament return then these two and Anand would give him trouble.
    The rest would play like rabbits caught in headlights.

    (think I'll nip across to chessgames.com and say the same thing. Been a while
    since I pissed on their cornflakes. They are so easy to wind up.)

    I caught a small piece of an advert on the radio that Nigel Lawson will be
    interviewing and playing Kasparov very soon. (or has he done it already.)
  9. 28 Apr '15 11:25
    Dominic Lawson. Looks like it's on a week today, Tuesday 5th May:
    http://www.radiotimes.com/episode/dkqpb5/across-the-board--series-3---2-garry-kasparov
  10. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    28 Apr '15 12:57
    Originally posted by Data Fly
    Dominic Lawson. Looks like it's on a week today, Tuesday 5th May:
    http://www.radiotimes.com/episode/dkqpb5/across-the-board--series-3---2-garry-kasparov
    Here is a game from Korchnoi V a young Carlsen, 2004:

    http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1326963
  11. Standard member vivify
    rain
    29 Apr '15 18:26
    If Gary is doing timed games like the one in the OP, age shouldn't be too much of a factor, right? If Gary sticks to blitz, I don't see why he can't do well (though eventually, even blitz will be too much for a person his age).