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  1. 07 Jun '08 19:18
    Has anybody had good results with Killer Chess Tactics? I picked it up from a bookstore yesterday. Its written by Eric Schiller, Keene, and Shamkovich. I guess its a combination of two books "World Champion Tactics" and "World Champion Combinations".

    I have Polgar's Chess 5,334 problems, combinations, and games. I did all the one move mates, but cant do the two movers, plus it has no description of the different tactics. So I bought CT Art 3.0, but it is WAY too hard for me at this stage.

    So at the bookstore this book had the different motifs labeled and looked like it had a ton of problems. I get home and looked at the Amazon reviews and everybody bad mouthed the book. So now Im scared it wont teach me correctly.

    Has anybody used the book to improve? And what are some other good tactic resources for beginners? Thanks
  2. Standard member emanon
    Student
    07 Jun '08 19:24
    I find that as a beginner you shouldn't read books but learn from the mistakes you make on the board. Once you get your own 'feel' of tactics you could read a book to explore different combinations and possibilities.

    That being said I suggest you leave the book alone for a while and start playing chess! You can't learn to swim by reading a book about it, right?
  3. 07 Jun '08 19:27
    I agree with you. The best way to get better at Chess is by playing. But my tactical mistakes are terrible. I just got checkmated out of the blue yesteday. I cant get into learning mode, because I make so many tactical blunders.
  4. 07 Jun '08 19:44 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by IndianaSwift
    I agree with you. The best way to get better at Chess is by playing. But my tactical mistakes are terrible. I just got checkmated out of the blue yesteday. I cant get into learning mode, because I make so many tactical blunders.
    Aah!
    You should have got this (read the reviews):
    http://tinyurl.com/572wac
    Much better & Mr Heisman explains in really simple terms what to look for & the puzzles have a perfect learning curve.
    You are right; after you have learnt how the pieces move & all the rules, stage 2 is the simple checkmates & tactics.
    I still strongly suggest you get Heisman's book.
    A plethora of people will probably suggest Sierawan's Winning Chess Tactics but I find that too padded-out, although it is probably the next best.
    The Keene book, although seductively hefty & reasonably priced, looks dis-organised & the learning curve seemed to be all over the place from a brief flick-through I had in the shop a while back. Also the authors seemed to have invented various weird names for tactics on the hoof which I have never seen before (or since!) which really doesn't help.
  5. 07 Jun '08 21:00
    what dan heisman chess book back to the basics tactics blue book 800- to 1700 rating dso you agreee sqelcherbeltch steve.or others people agree.back to basics tactics.
  6. 07 Jun '08 21:09
    Originally posted by lumax
    what dan heisman chess book back to the basics tactics blue book 800- to 1700 rating dso you agreee sqelcherbeltch steve.or others people agree.back to basics tactics.
    I would say 1000-1800 ish which does embrace about 95% of people who will ever move a chess piece in their lives.

    Are you pissed by any chance?
    If you are then so am I, although my typing seems to have suffered less!
  7. 07 Jun '08 21:35
    I will look for the Heisman book. Thanks.
  8. 07 Jun '08 22:04 / 1 edit
    You've hit upon a common problem with chess books - finding one that's right for you.

    I'd recommend:

    "Winning Chess Tactics" by Yasser Seirawan

    ...and for something with plenty of diagrams:

    "Chess Tactics for Kids" by Murray Chandler. The title by the way is in my opinion something of a misnomer. There is a kid friendly cover design and kid friendly chapter headings but the material inside is well presented and comprehensive. I say the title's a misnomer because I don't think it's easy enough for pre competition kids or complete beginners.

    Once you're familiar with the tactical themes you might want to visit this site for some practice:

    http://chess.emrald.net/

    This is the Chess Tactics Server often referred to in this forum as CTS.

    edit: haha just read squelchbelch's comment about Seraiwans book being padded out...maybe one persons '"padded out" is another's "careful easy to follow explanation" Still a good book imho ...but I haven't seen the other so can't compare.
  9. 07 Jun '08 22:30
    Originally posted by IndianaSwift
    Has anybody had good results with Killer Chess Tactics? I picked it up from a bookstore yesterday. Its written by Eric Schiller, Keene, and Shamkovich. I guess its a combination of two books "World Champion Tactics" and "World Champion Combinations".

    I have Polgar's Chess 5,334 problems, combinations, and games. I did all the one move mates, bu ...[text shortened]... the book to improve? And what are some other good tactic resources for beginners? Thanks
    I would suggest you to stick with the mate in 2s in Polgar's book until you can do them.

    what you need could be a recipe on how to calculate variations.
  10. 07 Jun '08 22:46
    Originally posted by Mahout
    ...and for something with plenty of diagrams:

    "Chess Tactics for Kids" by Murray Chandler. The title by the way is in my opinion something of a misnomer. There is a kid friendly cover design and kid friendly chapter headings but the material inside is well presented and comprehensive. I say the title's a misnomer because I don't think it's easy enough for pre competition kids or complete beginners.
    I know for a fact that I have absolutely no shame. I care not for a book's title or cover graphics.

    I have Wolff's "The Complete Idiot's Guide to Chess". And although I haven't been a kid in ages, I have Coakley's "Winning Chess Strategy for Kids" and "Winning Chess Exercises for Kids", and Bain's "Chess Tactics for Students". I also have Chandler's "How to Beat Your Dad at Chess", which seems to suffer the same misnomer as "Chess Tactics for Kids". The only reason I didn't get "Chess Tactics for Kids" is that I already have enough tactics books.
  11. 07 Jun '08 22:49 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Mad Rook
    I know for a fact that I have absolutely no shame. I care not for a book's title or cover graphics.

    I have Wolff's "The Complete Idiot's Guide to Chess". And although I haven't been a kid in ages, I have Coakley's "Winning Chess Strategy for Kids" and "Winning Chess Exercises for Kids", and Bain's "Chess Tactics for Students". I also have Chandler's "How t "Chess Tactics for Kids" is that I already have enough tactics books.
    lol, which have done him not the least bit of good, just ask him, i caught him reading positional concepts by Jacob Agaard the other day.
  12. 07 Jun '08 22:57
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    lol, which have done him not the least bit of good, just ask him, i caught him reading positional concepts by Jacob Agaard the other day.
    No, I don't have any Aagaard books. His titles aren't nearly silly enough.
  13. 07 Jun '08 23:07
    Originally posted by Mad Rook
    No, I don't have any Aagaard books. His titles aren't nearly silly enough.
    lol, while irrelevant, my favourite title not of a book, but a song, pink floyds, several species of small fury animals in a cave grooving with a pick, if only chess books were as flamboyantly named, i apologise for the divergence, i will speak no more.
  14. 08 Jun '08 01:32
    Originally posted by Squelchbelch
    Also the authors seemed to have invented various weird names for tactics on the hoof which I have never seen before (or since!) which really doesn't help.[/b]
    Maybe Schiller is trying to do for (to?) tactics what Hans Kmoch did for pawn power.
  15. 08 Jun '08 03:37
    the one author not to trust is eric shiller. my 18 year old friend whos 2150 USCF and climbing.cand beat that life master from hawii!