Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Only Chess Forum

Only Chess Forum

  1. Standard member ivan2908
    SelfProclaimedTitler
    04 Dec '06 20:47
    Quick question, for quick anwser, because I know that better players on this site often have to anwser to boring semi-stupid questions like mine. Sorry :-)

    My guestion is: Is it possible for an average chess talent to improve 300 points in a year by learning tutorials about openings, strategy and practicing drills (Chessmaster 10th), tipical endgames (fritz 10 drills), practicing tactical devices and combinations (chess tactics server). What should else I do? I study on musical academy where almost everybody are absolutely crazy about chess, but my friends are more like 1400 - 1800 players so I can't compete with them and enjoy tournaments without getting slaughtered. Also my tactics is better than my strategy.

    I have feeling that I am not improving recent half year, and it is very frustrating. Is it my goal of getting from 1200 to 1500 in a single year achievble in a way I described? I have time for chess two or two and a half hours daily.
  2. 04 Dec '06 20:51 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by ivan2908
    Quick question, for quick anwser, because I know that better players on this site often have to anwser to boring semi-stupid questions like mine. Sorry :-)

    My guestion is: Is it possible for an average chess talent to improve 300 points in a year by learning tutorials about openings, strategy and practicing drills (Chessmaster 10th), tipical endgames (fr e year achievble in a way I described? I have time for chess two or two and a half hours daily.
    Easily if you study that much.

    Look when I started playing on here, I was appx. 1300-1400.

    And I didn't study 2.5 hours a day.
  3. 04 Dec '06 20:54
    Well the short answer would really be that anything is possible.

    You asked though what else can be done in addition to the study tools you're already using. Everything sounds great but you can spend all the time you want in endgames and tactics drills and never improve your actual GAMES as much as you improve your UNDERSTANDING of the games.

    It's my opinion that pretty much all of us understand chess better than we normally play it. I think from what I've read so far your best option is to play over your OWN games and start trying to get a feel for where you are making the most mistakes and then try to understand what misconceptions led to those mistakes. Sometimes your biggest errors are the moves that you thought were good when you made them, you know?

    But WHY did you think they were good? Why weren't they? I think this is the best way for you to go. Let me know how it works out.

    Joe
  4. 04 Dec '06 21:00
    Originally posted by ivan2908
    Quick question, for quick anwser, because I know that better players on this site often have to anwser to boring semi-stupid questions like mine. Sorry :-)

    My guestion is: Is it possible for an average chess talent to improve 300 points in a year by learning tutorials about openings, strategy and practicing drills (Chessmaster 10th), tipical endgames (fr ...[text shortened]... e year achievble in a way I described? I have time for chess two or two and a half hours daily.
    Shouldnt be too hard although less time on study and maybe more playing 90min+ games, its easy to learn things putting them into practice is a lot harder
  5. 04 Dec '06 21:11
    YES, study tactics then openings and endgames equally and you should be able to reach 1400 OTB, granted that you play many OTB games!

    I can only speak of my RHP rating because I have no formal OTB rating and suffer in this area. When I joined this site I was easily a 1000-1100 rated player. (take a look at my first game: Game 1449026 ) but as I played more and more I was able to study the openings as I went (via websites) and gradually amassed a decent understanding of most popular openings. This helped me little although because I still lacked a tactical understanding and therefore began studying the subject very much. Once my tactical understanding caught up to me I began winning many more games and now my rating is around 1500! So I joined 30th of September 2005 (about one year and 2 months) and since then have improved at least 300 points. Of course, along the way I studied the endgame too, and this is what I am beginning to turn my focus to now.
  6. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    04 Dec '06 21:42
    I'm certain that my strength improved the equivalent of 300 rating points when I started reading chess books. Alas, this was 20 years before I earned an official rating, so there's no evidence.

    I believe any player rated 1200 or so can rise to 1500 or so in the space of 6 months to a year with the right study program (but which program is right varies).
  7. 04 Dec '06 21:57
    Originally posted by ivan2908
    Quick question, for quick anwser, because I know that better players on this site often have to anwser to boring semi-stupid questions like mine. Sorry :-)

    My guestion is: Is it possible for an average chess talent to improve 300 points in a year by learning tutorials about openings, strategy and practicing drills (Chessmaster 10th), tipical endgames (fr ...[text shortened]... e year achievble in a way I described? I have time for chess two or two and a half hours daily.
    You want to get from 1200-1500 quickly hey within a year. That is possible!

    I went from 1700-1850 in less then a year and the higher up you go the hard it is to improve that quick.

    Here's what you do: Learn the basic concepts, basic strategy. If you can get your hands on the Winning Chess Series Books by Gm Yasser Seirwan then your are set.

    After that read a few books, but most important is to do tactics!!!!!!!!!!

    Do at least 5 per day but the more your do the better.

    Games at the 1200-1500 are won because someone blunders. So tactics, tactics!
  8. 04 Dec '06 21:59
    Here you go, check these out also. The 1400 thread, read page 2 half way down and follow that, The 1600 thread read all of it, the rest you can read if you have time:

    http://www.redhotpawn.com/board/showthread.php?threadid=56236

    http://www.redhotpawn.com/board/showthread.php?threadid=51995

    http://www.redhotpawn.com/board/showthread.php?threadid=49595

    http://www.redhotpawn.com/board/showthread.php?threadid=39309

    and the list goes on and on [/b]
  9. Standard member ivan2908
    SelfProclaimedTitler
    05 Dec '06 17:53
    Thank you for helping! Would someone be so kind to rewiev my game, played a two months before to tell me what I should improve. Some other time I would like to also submit one game that I lost...
  10. Standard member ivan2908
    SelfProclaimedTitler
    05 Dec '06 17:54
  11. 05 Dec '06 18:22
    one hour daily, five times a week is more than enough. i suggest going over capablacnc's games --- you'll absorb so much, even with minimal annotations/analysis. if you don't like capablanca, maybe karpov's games will be almost as instructional and more comtemporary.
  12. Standard member ivan2908
    SelfProclaimedTitler
    05 Dec '06 18:50
    Aren't that games too complitated to someone with my knowledge? Because behind all those Capablanca, Karpov etc. moves stands fantastic chess understanding. I looked over annotated games in Chessmaster annotated "Famous games" but often happens that some move (which even isn't annotated sometimes) is completely immposible to understand for me. I didn't watch Capablanca games though maybe they are more easy to understand than others...
  13. 05 Dec '06 19:03
    Originally posted by ivan2908
    Aren't that games too complitated to someone with my knowledge? Because behind all those Capablanca, Karpov etc. moves stands fantastic chess understanding. I looked over annotated games in Chessmaster annotated "Famous games" but often happens that some move (which even isn't annotated sometimes) is completely immposible to understand for me. I didn't watch Capablanca games though maybe they are more easy to understand than others...
    That's why I'm saying you should start with your own games. Believe me I understand what you're saying. Don't go too far too fast or you'll only end up frustrating yourself. It'll be fine. If you want to learn you'll learn.
  14. 06 Dec '06 00:35 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by ivan2908
    Aren't that games too complitated to someone with my knowledge? Because behind all those Capablanca, Karpov etc. moves stands fantastic chess understanding. I looked over annotated games in Chessmaster annotated "Famous games" but often happens that some move (which even isn't annotated sometimes) is completely immposible to understand for me. I didn't watch Capablanca games though maybe they are more easy to understand than others...
    I got what you are looking for:

    http://www.redhotpawn.com/board/showthread.php?threadid=56236&page=12

    Sign up and learn. All I require is that you answer my puzzles to the best of your abilities.

    You get 2 days to send in your answer. Whether it is right or wrong, I don't care.

    I go over old master games, Morphy is the best for this. His games are easy to understand and teach you the basics.
  15. 06 Dec '06 00:40
    Originally posted by ivan2908
    Game 2443195
    Tactics. You lost your e pawn early on to that. This led to your bishop getting stuck on c3 and you had a pawn on d4. Thus, this bishop wasn't doing much, Bad bishop. It might as well be a pawn.

    Then your opponent blundered putting you back in the game.

    Then you lost your bishop.

    So you need to work on tactics and make sure your king is safe before attacking.