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  1. Standard member TimmyBx
    TacticsTime.com
    20 Feb '12 02:32
    there was an interesting 13 minute segment on "60 minutes" tonight - you can see the video here.

    http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7399370n&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+cbsnews%2Ffeed+%28CBSNews.com%29

    I really enjoyed it!
  2. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    20 Feb '12 12:45 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by TimmyBx
    there was an interesting 13 minute segment on "60 minutes" tonight - you can see the video here.

    http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7399370n&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+cbsnews%2Ffeed+%28CBSNews.com%29

    I really enjoyed it!
    I think the ability to visualize or keep track of where the pieces are in the
    mind is one of the most important things for a very good chess player to be
    able to do. This is why I do not play well over the board, but if I can move
    the pieces around and actually see where they will be several moves ahead
    allows me to play much better.
  3. 20 Feb '12 13:00
    Forget all this stuff about candidate moves; Just know the move to play, verify it and play it. Simple!
  4. 20 Feb '12 14:04 / 1 edit
    GPII is on the right track.

    When you see your opponents move usually the first reply you think of
    is the move you are going to play. I've seen the stats vary but I think seven
    out of ten times is about right.

    But of course you must look at it (time permitting) you never know when
    the 7/10 ratio will strike and it could happen four or five moves on the trot.

    Sometimes you can analyse yourself out of making a good move.
    "I felt I wanted to play this move, (the correct move) but did not like this
    (a ghost threat) as a reply." Is often heard in the analysis room.

    I saw the Angus McArlsen interview (him being a Norwegian is a load of bull
    - he's Scottish.)

    http://www.chessville.com/GC/TheRealReasonWhyCarlsenPulledOutOfTheWorldChampionship.htm

    He's gifted, so it's obvious he cannot explain fully how he does it.
    His most revealing statement was that of the intimidation he felt when playing Kasparov.
    That is something OTB players have to deal with and partly explains why many
    of the great players get draws or even wins from bad positions against fellow GM's.

    Look for caes of that 'unplayed winning move or plan'.
    The intimidated player often goes against his first choice (see above) and finds
    a valid reason (convinces himself) not to play it.
    Such games exist on all the great players CV's, you never or rarely see them
    in the collected best games because it does look like a swindle. (a dirty word at GM level).
  5. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    20 Feb '12 14:33
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    GPII is on the right track.

    When you see your opponents move usually the first reply you think of
    is the move you are going to play. I've seen the stats vary but I think seven
    out of ten times is about right.

    But of course you must look at it (time permitting) you never know when
    the 7/10 ratio will strike and it could happen four or five moves ...[text shortened]... collected best games because it does look like a swindle. (a dirty word at GM level).
    Making the first move I think of hasn't worked for me OTB. I've done it
    in rapid games and it may be okay for a couple of moves, then all of a
    sudden it turns out to be a trap and I am losing. I just recently played
    the first thing that came to my mind against the Stafford Gambit that I
    had never seen before in one of these rapid OTB games and wound up
    with a pawn, knight, and bishop for my queen plus my position was bad
    too.
  6. 20 Feb '12 14:47 / 3 edits
    You have to show the game. Did it go something like this?

    Game 2493036

  7. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    20 Feb '12 15:05 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    You have to show the game. Did it go something like this?

    Game 2493036

    [pgn]
    1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 Nc6 {The Stafford Gambit.} 4. Nxc6 dxc6 5. e5 Ne4 6. d3 Bc5 7. dxe4 Bxf2+ 8. Kxf2 Qxd1[/pgn]
    Yes, that is exactly what happened. I didn't remember at first because
    it was one of the rapid games. But that's it. He actually got the pawn
    back before he got my queen too. I had thought I still had the extra pawn.

    P.S. After he beat me he told me it was the Stafford Gambit and that
    there was other ways I could have went wrong. But I guess I made it
    easy for him.
  8. Donation ketchuplover
    G.O.A.T.
    20 Feb '12 15:51
    I hope Magnus gets ribbed for getting the wrong year on the immortal game.
  9. 20 Feb '12 16:58
    Originally posted by ketchuplover
    I hope Magnus gets ribbed for getting the wrong year on the immortal game.
    maybe he will!
    i'd let it slide.

    did he claim to know any position from any game? or was it just the final position of any/a selection of games?
  10. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    20 Feb '12 17:18 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by greenerpawn
    maybe he will!
    i'd let it slide.

    did he claim to know any position from any game? or was it just the final position of any/a selection of games?
    No, only 10,000 master games that he had memorized.
  11. Standard member TimmyBx
    TacticsTime.com
    20 Feb '12 19:33
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    No, only 10,000 master games that he had memorized.
    lol!

    BTW - some of the 60 minutes "extras" on the site are quite good also.

    In the one Fredric F. from chessbase says that Magnus can do things with his brain that a cognitive psychologist would consider "impossible", and in another they go up in a Ferris Wheel, and Magnus doesn't even look at the view once, because he is thinking about chess.
  12. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    20 Feb '12 20:41
    Originally posted by TimmyBx
    lol!

    BTW - some of the 60 minutes "extras" on the site are quite good also.

    In the one Fredric F. from chessbase says that Magnus can do things with his brain that a cognitive psychologist would consider "impossible", and in another they go up in a Ferris Wheel, and Magnus doesn't even look at the view once, because he is thinking about chess.
    It takes a lot of practice to stay in shape for any sport.
  13. 20 Feb '12 20:45
    Originally posted by TimmyBx
    lol!

    BTW - some of the 60 minutes "extras" on the site are quite good also.

    In the one Fredric F. from chessbase says that Magnus can do things with his brain that a cognitive psychologist would consider "impossible", and in another they go up in a Ferris Wheel, and Magnus doesn't even look at the view once, because he is thinking about chess.
    I would be curious to hear what a cognitive psychologist would consider impossible!
  14. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    21 Feb '12 01:19
    Originally posted by kyngj
    I would be curious to hear what a cognitive psychologist would consider impossible!
    I hope he uses his brain for something more useful than playing games
    of Chess and does not follow the path of those that makes chess their
    entire career. It seems he may have a talent that should not be wasted
    on just playing chess.
  15. 21 Feb '12 07:27
    "It seems he may have a talent that should not be wasted on just playing chess."

    Just leave him alone to play chess, he is giving millions harmless pleasure.

    There are already enough of these clever people going around screwing things up.

    Look at the brain power that went into building atomic weapons.
    Then think of all the other ingenious ways that have been invented just to kill,
    maim and destroy. Clever people are dangerous.

    I reckon that mankind's first invention was a club to kill things with.
    It's in the genes.

    Re; The Magnus Mistake

    I think Magnus may have been the victim of perhaps knowing too much.
    Did he not say the game was played in '1855'.

    But what was the question, how was it phrased?

    The game was played in 1851 but given the name 'The Immortal' in 1855.