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  1. 14 May '09 23:17
    I have been in a situation where both players keep moving back and forth to the same positions.

    For instance, one piece is moved to attack a second piece. The second piece moves. The first piece moves again to attack the second piece. The second piece moves back to the same position. The first piece moves back to the same position to attack the second piece. And they keep going back and forth.

    Is there a max number of times this can be done, or does the game go on forever until one player blinks?
  2. 14 May '09 23:20 / 5 edits
    Copied and pasted from FAQ

    A draw can be claimed without any interaction from your
    opponent under a number of conditions.

    These are as follows:


    No piece capture or pawn movement has occurred for over 50
    consecutive moves (100 half moves).

    Therefore the game has not progressed and a draw may be claimed
    by either player during their next move.


    Insufficient material remains on the board to finish the game.
    If only two kings remain then either player may claim a draw
    during their next move.


    Third repetition of a position.

    If any identical position appears three times during a game,
    then the game can be claimed as a draw.

    Please note that each repetition must be identical with regards to
    en passant and castling availability. A draw can only be claimed along
    with a move that contributes to a repetition. Claiming after the
    repetition has occurred is not possible, unless the same position can
    be repeated again on a future move.
  3. 14 May '09 23:28
    Thanks.
  4. 15 May '09 07:43
    Originally posted by greenpawn34

    Please note that each repetition must be identical with regards to
    en passant and castling availability. A draw can only be claimed along
    with a move that contributes to a repetition. Claiming after the
    repetition has occurred is not possible, unless the same position can
    be repeated again on a future move.
    This part confused me. My understand is that the third time the same position is reached, meaning, the board is an exact mirror of before then a draw can be claimed.

    Is this basically what you're saying?
  5. 15 May '09 08:07
    Originally posted by USArmyParatrooper
    This part confused me. My understand is that the third time the same position is reached, meaning, the board is an exact mirror of before then a draw can be claimed.

    Is this basically what you're saying?
    Yes. Three positions, and you can claim a draw. They have not to be consecutive.
  6. Subscriber Ponderable
    chemist
    15 May '09 09:13 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by USArmyParatrooper
    This part confused me. My understand is that the third time the same position is reached, meaning, the board is an exact mirror of before then a draw can be claimed.

    Is this basically what you're saying?
    The point about en passant and castling availability is exotic but I will give you an example.

    So lets look at this one:

    8/6kp/6p1/6P1/7K/8/8/8 w - - 0 1

    if black plays h5 (and since I want to point out the e.p. rule I don't want comments on how other moves would win) and White does not take e.p. The draw would not be effective after Kh3 Kh7 Kh4 Kg7 Kh3 Kh7 Kh4 Kh7 Kh3. It surely is the same position. But in the first instance white yould have taken by gxh4e.p. Of course the situation is a draw anyway fter the next move which will constitute the threefold repetition.
  7. 15 May '09 13:59
    Originally posted by USArmyParatrooper
    This part confused me. My understand is that the third time the same position is reached, meaning, the board is an exact mirror of before then a draw can be claimed.

    Is this basically what you're saying?
    En passant is often the most confusing, but when they mean same position, they actually are including en passant availability (same applies with castling).

    So where a two space pawn move which has passed the opponent's pawn has occured (which, of course, makes it possible for the opponent to capture en passant), this is a unique position in itself. Any repeating positions where the pieces are in the same place will be part of the three fold repitition and have to exclude the position where en passant was available.
  8. 15 May '09 20:36
    Originally posted by lausey
    En passant is often the most confusing, but when they mean same position, they actually are including en passant availability (same applies with castling).

    So where a two space pawn move which has passed the opponent's pawn has occured (which, of course, makes it possible for the opponent to capture en passant), this is a unique position in itself. Any rep ...[text shortened]... t of the three fold repitition and have to exclude the position where en passant was available.
    So basically if white plays h5 the "position count", if you will, starts at 0 intead of 1 - because after you choose a different move en passant is no longer available. Correct?
  9. 18 May '09 20:28
    Originally posted by USArmyParatrooper
    So basically if white plays h5 the "position count", if you will, starts at 0 intead of 1 - because after you choose a different move en passant is no longer available. Correct?
    Correct.