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  1. 02 Jun '09 20:45
    How long did it take you guys to memorize the coordinates of each square? To the point where you can instantly see a random square and instantly know what it's coordinates are (g6, b4, c8).

    One of my weaknesses is that reading chess moves in a book is such a chore. It takes me several seconds to figure out what square a certain move is talking about, and by the time I can visualize it in my head I've lost the whole flow of the line. When I watch chess pros throw out analysis I have to pause the vids at times because I can't keep up with the coordinates they say.

    Is there some kind of training exercise one can do to improve their coordinate visualization? Or does it just come from hours and hours of playing out book moves?
  2. 02 Jun '09 20:53 / 2 edits
    you could try doing the knight's tour blindfolded if you'd like. It might help, it might not. I think there is some execise on a chess site where it gives you coordinates and asks for the color of the square. I'm not sure if it is of use in and of itself but i would guess most good chess players immediately know which squares are what color, which pieces can control those squares from there starting positions and so on. I think learning rook endgames or mating patterns would be more useful.

    i usually try to play through variations over a board even if is just a tactical puzzle.
  3. 02 Jun '09 20:54
    Ah! Beleive me, you are not alone. I guess it comes with practice. After you've played a number of games on a board you should get it. Then comes the challenge of knowing what colour a square is after being told the coordinates but without looking at the board.
  4. 02 Jun '09 23:09 / 1 edit
    I have a difficult time with it too, and sometimes make mistakes when following games from a book. I greatly prefer descriptive notation, as it makes more sense to me and is far more intuitive. Doubt there is any cure but practice, though.
  5. 02 Jun '09 23:38
    Originally posted by redhotlawn
    How long did it take you guys to memorize the coordinates of each square? To the point where you can instantly see a random square and instantly know what it's coordinates are (g6, b4, c8).

    One of my weaknesses is that reading chess moves in a book is such a chore. It takes me several seconds to figure out what square a certain move is talking about, ...[text shortened]... oordinate visualization? Or does it just come from hours and hours of playing out book moves?
    Don't think about it.Over time it'll come by itself without you even realising.

    This thread has made me try the color thing.Not very good at it.
    But would I be a better player if I could do it well.........
  6. 02 Jun '09 23:44
    Quote:
    "Or does it just come from hours and hours of playing out book moves?"

    It should not take hours - just keep doing it and suddenly it will all click.
    Believe me, it will all just fall into place and you will wonder what
    the problem was.
  7. 02 Jun '09 23:57
    Some people memorize things more easily than others. Some people just pick it up, some people have to study, and some people will never get it no longer how long they study.

    I don't have it down yet, but then I've never tried to memorize it yet. I'd say that I could memorize it more quickly than most, but less quickly than most people who achieve ratings above 2000. Just a guess there, but I think it is safe to say that those who are able to reach 2000 are fairly intellegent and are gifted with visual ability and recall.
  8. 03 Jun '09 00:45 / 1 edit
    when playing otb games serious or not, write the moves down, trust me this works quickly.
  9. 03 Jun '09 00:47
    I've never written my moves down either.
  10. 03 Jun '09 01:20
    Originally posted by Eladar
    Some people memorize things more easily than others. Some people just pick it up, some people have to study, and some people will never get it no longer how long they study.

    I don't have it down yet, but then I've never tried to memorize it yet. I'd say that I could memorize it more quickly than most, but less quickly than most people who achieve rating ...[text shortened]... are able to reach 2000 are fairly intellegent and are gifted with visual ability and recall.
    I'd say you were nearly correct.

    "but I think it is safe to say that those who are able to reach 2000
    are fairly intellegent and are gifted with visual ability and recall."

    Drop the words 'fairly intelligent, gifted and recall'.

    Gifted:
    It's practice, study and more study. There is bit of work involved.
    I don't like the word 'work' but can think of no other word.
    Enjoyable work is perhaps a better term.
    If you want to be good at ches then you must put in the study time.

    The gifted ones sail to 2400/2500.

    Recall:
    There is no such thing as a bad memory. An untrained memory, yes.
    a bad memory no.

    Intelligence:
    (The intelligent one never take up chess in the first place).
  11. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    03 Jun '09 02:26
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    I don't like the word 'work' but can think of no other word.
    Enjoyable work is perhaps a better term.
    labour of love?


    I fully agree on everything else you said as well.
  12. 03 Jun '09 03:57
    uhmm. Randomly see a square. There are only two types of squares. They have one differentiating properties beyond location. Seems silly
  13. 03 Jun '09 06:42
    I really believe the solution to your problem is : be active.
    Take part in public analyis, where you will have to write lines; when doing a move, just name the squares (like "I move Nb1 to Nc3": it's much more useful than passively trying to learn things, like trying to learn these squares by heart or trying read other people's analysis, without ever using annotation yourself...
  14. Standard member orion25
    Art is hard
    03 Jun '09 14:15
    I'm trying to learn it now, what I do, here on RHP, is by every move I have to make I jolt down all the possibilities I'm considering with responses and all (I try to analise it at least 4 moves deep but it depens on the position - just go on until you find a position were you can say "I would like this" or "I wouldn't enjoy playing this" ), this helps learn the names of the squares and to make the best moves as well, but I have to admit, sometimes I'm a bit lazy and I don't do it, hence all my blunders...
  15. Standard member Blackamp
    Death
    06 Jun '09 16:20 / 1 edit
    i find that i know certain squares that are important in the openings i employ. e.g if i hear 'c4' i think 'white' for example. same with f3, c5 (black) and a few others. there are too few of these. other squares, say h5, i have to think about it.