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  1. 03 Aug '13 04:37
    In general, is it better for black pieces to be in black squares (and white in white), or is the opposite true?
  2. 03 Aug '13 07:03
    Originally posted by Quiet Crow
    In general, is it better for black pieces to be in black squares (and white in white), or is the opposite true?
    The only possible answer I could give you is that generally the bishop of a colour is stronger on its colour squares. e.g the black dark squared bishops is usually more powerful than the black light squared and the white light squared bishop is more important to white than his dark squared bishop.
  3. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    03 Aug '13 12:09
    Originally posted by Quiet Crow
    In general, is it better for black pieces to be in black squares (and white in white), or is the opposite true?
    I would say that neither is intrinsically better- it depends on the other factors in the position.

    An excellent example is in the King's Indian Defense. Superficially, one would think that Black's dark-squared bishop is the more valuable bishop.

    However, very often Black's dark-squared bishop is the less valuable bishop, particularly in closed centers such as the Mar del Plata center.

    Black would be happy to exchange off his dark-squared bishop in such a center, while at the same time, he could give up any real hope of mounting a kingside attack if his light-squared bishop is traded off early.

    The best answer is "It depends".
  4. Subscriber Ragwort
    Ex Duris Gloria
    03 Aug '13 12:25
    Originally posted by Quiet Crow
    In general, is it better for black pieces to be in black squares (and white in white), or is the opposite true?
    I think they are much easier to see when they are on their opposite colour squares which is why I choose the "clear water" board for my games on this site.
  5. 03 Aug '13 13:02
    It is best to place your white pieces on white squares and your black pieces
    on black sqaures. Your opponent will not see them and you can sneak up on him.

    The White Square Stealth Attack.

  6. 03 Aug '13 13:40
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    It is best to place your white pieces on white squares and your black pieces
    on black sqaures. Your opponent will not see them and you can sneak up on him.

    I was thinking an interesting chess variant would be a cross between chess and minesweeper. You can't see your opponent's pieces directly, but the unoccupied squares next to the pieces show the sum of the values of the pieces. So an empty square adjacent to a queen and a pawn would show 10 (9+1), if there was a knight adjacent as well it would show 13, etc.

    Or something like that.

    A Q all by itself would be obvious, but when all the pieces were together it would be tricky to deduce where your opponent's pieces were hiding.
  7. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    03 Aug '13 23:22
    Originally posted by Quiet Crow
    In general, is it better for black pieces to be in black squares (and white in white), or is the opposite true?
    I don't think you can make a general statement like that for it would depend on which piece you are referring to and which opening you are using and maybe what stage of the game you are in, etc. There are just too many factors to consider to make such a general statement on that, IMO.

    The Instructor
  8. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    03 Aug '13 23:30
    Originally posted by aquatabby
    I was thinking an interesting chess variant would be a cross between chess and minesweeper. You can't see your opponent's pieces directly, but the unoccupied squares next to the pieces show the sum of the values of the pieces. So an empty square adjacent to a queen and a pawn would show 10 (9+1), if there was a knight adjacent as well it would show 13, etc ...[text shortened]... pieces were together it would be tricky to deduce where your opponent's pieces were hiding.
    That sounds like an interesting idea. But the game is already too complicated for me to master. That might be a challenge for those who like to exercise their brains. However, I have gotten lazy in my old age. I like to make a couple moves, take a nap to rest my brain, make a couple more moves, and take another nap, etc.

    The Instructor
  9. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    09 Aug '13 02:52
    Originally posted by Quiet Crow
    In general, is it better for black pieces to be in black squares (and white in white), or is the opposite true?
    Just control the whole board and don't sweat it.
  10. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    09 Aug '13 04:29
    Originally posted by Quiet Crow
    In general, is it better for black pieces to be in black squares (and white in white), or is the opposite true?
    It doesn't matter what colour they are, it matters how good they are.
  11. 09 Aug '13 05:18
    Originally posted by Tygert
    The only possible answer I could give you is that generally the [b]bishop of a colour is stronger on its colour squares. e.g the black dark squared bishops is usually more powerful than the black light squared and the white light squared bishop is more important to white than his dark squared bishop.[/b]
    I've always thought that, in part due to the 'third-pawn-in' weakness when a player castles kingside.