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  1. 06 May '11 13:42 / 1 edit
    Another stupendous loss, but i take moral courage that I lost rather creatively. Any
    thoughts, offers of advice other than, your pants give it up would be appreciated.


  2. Donation ketchuplover
    G.O.A.T.
    06 May '11 14:35
    (((((Robbie)))))
  3. Standard member chessicle
    The Chessicle
    06 May '11 18:23
    Bishops are good attacking and defending pieces. Look at all those nicely controlled light squares on the kingside (after 10-12 moves, or so), and vulnerable dark squares on the same side - and then think about which bishop you'd rather still have?
  4. 06 May '11 18:27 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by chessicle
    Bishops are good attacking and defending pieces. Look at all those nicely controlled light squares on the kingside (after 10-12 moves, or so), and vulnerable dark squares on the same side - and then think about which bishop you'd rather still have?
    you gotta give up squares to get others, defence? what's that
  5. 06 May '11 18:28
    Originally posted by ketchuplover
    (((((Robbie)))))
    I am not sure what that means, but it looks cool, thanks for support
  6. Standard member nimzo5
    Ronin
    06 May '11 20:51
    Interesting game Robbie. Probably the dark square bishop exchange was a bit much, although you had a plan that makes sense for not needing it. Not much else to say except that now you have a new tactical pattern to keep in mind when playing down the h file.
  7. Standard member Tarpey
    Wizzard Lv.3
    06 May '11 21:36
    Hi Robbie, enjoyed your game & commentary particularly "look at my bishop... ...radiantly sending out death rays"

    Please go forth and lose some more so you can post games here for our enjoyment!

    :o)
  8. 07 May '11 09:07
    Originally posted by nimzo5
    Interesting game Robbie. Probably the dark square bishop exchange was a bit much, although you had a plan that makes sense for not needing it. Not much else to say except that now you have a new tactical pattern to keep in mind when playing down the h file.
    thanks Nimzo, I find these minor piece exchanges to be the most difficult decisions upon the board. At the moment i am studying Fischers games as he is reputed to be the ultimate in this area, in an attempt to get some kind of inkling. I find that for example Silmans type of thing, if its a closed position, knights are better etc to be too simplistic, chess is not that simple.
  9. 07 May '11 09:08
    Originally posted by Tarpey
    Hi Robbie, enjoyed your game & commentary particularly "look at my bishop... ...radiantly sending out death rays"

    Please go forth and lose some more so you can post games here for our enjoyment!

    :o)
    Lol, well if it raised a smile my friend it is enough for me
  10. 07 May '11 13:38 / 1 edit
    Robbie...Robbie....Robbie.

    How could you miss the pseudo Queen sac.


    18...Qh1+ as you said simply wins.

    It's the first combination in.....

    http://www.redhotpawn.com/blog/blogread.php?blogpostid=51

    I missed mine OTB in 1977 so you might learn from it.

    G. Chandler - C. Taylor, Edinburgh Open 1977


    I did not play Qxh7+.

    I remember sitting there thinking.

    "OK I won't play the Queen sac because in 2011 Robbie the Blunderer will see
    this postion, get the idea, let it sink in, and play it in his game v Sheneval."

    34 years I waited to see my sacrifice of a full point bear fruit.
    And now this....

    You owe me big time Mr R. one full tournament point and 34 years.

    CHECK ALL CHECKS (...and read the blog)
  11. 07 May '11 13:42
    hallo,

    thanks for the game. when did you see, you missed the sac?

    on the minor pieces, i agree with what was said. maybe a rule of thumb, if in doubt again: your bishop was that nice guy for a kingside castled king, since you already put so many moves into getting it there. plus, the knight was kind of underpositioned (only six squares to attack) and the queen couldnt look properly across the board. sorry, if this was obvious advice and of course it is a static advice, which might not apply in the next position...

    t.
  12. 07 May '11 14:33
    Hi Robbie,

    I also enjoyed your annotations, very entertaining!

    But about move 10, Robbie says, "Now i was faced with the problem of which piece to capture with. I have envisioned that me dark squared bishop will remain passive for some time, therfore i chose him. Even yet i am not sure if this was the right decision."

    When you're not sure of what you should have done, why not "box it" after the fact? All will become clear! Hint: Your g4 knight was loose, but your opponent didn't pick up on it. (Yeah, I know, having to stoop to using one of those evil engines.)
  13. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    07 May '11 14:57
    Originally posted by Mad Rook
    Hi Robbie,

    I also enjoyed your annotations, very entertaining!

    But about move 10, Robbie says, "Now i was faced with the problem of which piece to capture with. I have envisioned that me dark squared bishop will remain passive for some time, therfore i chose him. [b]Even yet i am not sure if this was the right decision.
    "

    When you're not sure of ...[text shortened]... didn't pick up on it. (Yeah, I know, having to stoop to using one of those evil engines.)[/b]
    There's nothing wrong with using an engine, although I think one should try to form your own opinion so you have the practice and also a basis for comparision.

    The source of the truth does not change the fact that it is the truth.

    I also think that we sometimes forget that engines are more than mere brute force calculators. They are based on algorithms designed by humans who are trying to approximate a methodology that determines the truth of a position, and they use the brute force calculating abilities of computers to implement and test the algorithms. That's why engines playing each other on the same computer don't draw every game.

    Really, the engines are a primitive form of AI used to approximate the human evaluation of a position, and the computers are the brute force calculators.

    But I digress.
  14. Standard member nimzo5
    Ronin
    07 May '11 15:10
    1) play through a game quickly getting a rough feel for it
    2) now go through a second time taking notes like "which way should I recapture"
    3) now go through with and work through all the lines etc you made notes on analyzing the positions. Work through each line until you have reached a concrete conclusion. This will take time.

    Only at after all the above has been done, do you switch on the box.
  15. 07 May '11 15:13 / 2 edits
    One interesting idea that the box gave me about move 10 - Do you even have to capture at all?

    10...Ngf6 is an interesting option. It reroutes the loose g4 knight to a more secure square and also protects the d5 pawn. (And once you play either ...c6 or ...e6, the f6 knight can go to e4 with a nice knight outpost.) And no need to worry about White's e5 knight. I don't see how it can immediately hurt you.

    Edit - Yeah, nimzo5's advice seems best; no argument with that.