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  1. 03 Jun '10 15:37
    Hi everyone!

    I just finished this game (and lost it). I found White's knight sacrifice really impressive... How could have I done better?

    Thanks for comments!


  2. 03 Jun '10 16:18
    ...a6 seemed unnecessary and I don't understand why you placed your knight on e7 instead of your bishop.

    check out this try

    http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1472080

  3. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    03 Jun '10 16:36
    Originally posted by dzhafner
    ...a6 seemed unnecessary and I don't understand why you placed your knight on e7 instead of your bishop.

    check out this try

    http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1472080

    [pgn]1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. c3 dxc3 5. Nxc3 Nc6 6. Bc4 e6 7. O-O Be7 8. Qe2 Nf6 9. Rd1 e5 10. h3 O-O 11. Bg5 Be6 12. Rd2 Rc8 13. Bxf6 Bxf6 14. Bxe6 fxe6 15. Rad1 N ...[text shortened]... f7 20. Rc2 Rxa2 21. Qc4 Ra6 22. Qd5 Rc6 23. Rdc1 Rxc2 24. Rxc2 Kf8 25. Qc4 Re7 26. Nc7 d3[/pgn]
    He was setting up a la the Taimanov, which is not unreasonable, especially if White plays Bc4.

    What lost me was ...f6. I cringed a bit on that one, and the internal alarms that sounded due to the resulting light square weaknesses around black's king were made manifest by white's light square bishop.
  4. 04 Jun '10 01:00
    thanks for the answers! Actually, I think it's pretty much book until Nd4... uncluding f6, which usually doesn't create problems when Nd4 is not played ...
  5. 04 Jun '10 01:25
    Best way to analyze your games now a days would be computer programs, unless you want to pay for a coach. I would suggest the cheapest version of fritz that will run on your computer. Plug the game in infinite analysis mode, then click analyze. Kills any fun with the forums, but works great.
  6. 04 Jun '10 13:18
    Originally posted by Inpassing
    Best way to analyze your games now a days would be computer programs, unless you want to pay for a coach. I would suggest the cheapest version of fritz that will run on your computer. Plug the game in infinite analysis mode, then click analyze. Kills any fun with the forums, but works great.
    I find that analysing using a computer is fine for finding mistakes in that particular game, but for going forward discussion of human-level principles in the forum is very helpful ...
  7. 04 Jun '10 15:23
    In this line of the morra...Nge7...black normally plays f6 with the horse going to g6...there is a standerd trick which takes place when black dont play a6...and plays Nge7 and then h6 only to find Nb5 wins!....h6 can be played here but after Bh4..black plays d6 which can not be recommended...and as for pawn-g5 black cant have all these pawn weakness and expect to get away with it kasparov was lucky to escape with a draw v landa ussr simul 1988 and the great man was a pawn up!
  8. 04 Jun '10 17:43
    It's just a struggle until move 20...

    At that point, your king is in bad shape because:

    1) Your K-side light squares are horribly weakened, and your opponent has an active bishop set to go to work on them

    2) Your opponent's queen is sitting comfortably in a very active place, ready to enter the battle

    3) Your opponent's rook completely dominates the wide open c-file

    4) Your king is stuck in the center

    Obviously, after 20.Bxh6, your king is under attack. Your opponent is removing a k-side defender, and you must recognize this. To stave off the oncoming attack, your next move HAS to address one or more of those four problem spots, or you're a goner.

    A quick engine check gives 20...Qe5, offering the trade of queens, and not giving white time to blow you up with Bh5.

    A look at alternatives suggests Bc6 would shut down the c-file for the time being, giving you a additional flight squares, and chance to fight on.

    g6 gives your opponent new and different targets on the k-side, but effectively shuts down the light squares over there for at least the moment, giving you time to rearrange your defense.

    Qf7 does the same.

    None of these moves fixes your position, or gives you the initiative, but when your situation is dire, logical moves that address problems (versus immediate, unthinking moves that do not) are the difference between putting on a tourniquet and bleeding to death.