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  1. 28 Feb '11 03:39 / 1 edit
    It was a 7 round Swiss System pairing. 25 minutes per player per game. 108 players turned up for this event.

    I won 4, lost 3. Some trivia below.

    - My first OTB Tournament and with a clock. I was terribly uncomfortable using the clock for the first two rounds.

    - All my losses were because of my big blunders. So, my target is to get my blunder count to 0 in my forth coming events.

    - I lost to 2 school kids and a gentleman 🙂

    - In all my games (irrespective of wins or losses), I had plenty of time on my clock. This is a good sign because I have prepared on the opening lines well 🙂

    - I played Danish gambit in 2 games and won 1.

    - I have noticed that in almost all boards standard opening lines like Ruy Lopez were played. I didn't play Latvian 😀 Still preparing on it.


    - My first game was against a kid and I had reached this position.


    After he played Be7, I played h5 and was waiting for the kid to castle but he never did 🙂

    After a few moves I had to exchange my bishops with his knights. This "After a few moves" period had atleast 2 instances where I forgot to hit the clock.

    Then, when I blundered (I realized it after making the move 😛), I was waiting for the kid to proceed with his step. He never moved. I waited for a minute and looked up and he immediately looked down at the board. I realized that he was looking at me. Then I continued looking at the board then after some 30 secs or so, I looked up again and he immediately looked down at the board.
    Then I decided to wait for his move and looked at the clock. Damn it! I didn't hit the clock and lost a good amount of 3 minutes 😀. As soon as I hit the clock, he made his move and captured my rook. LOL

    - In one of the games, my opponent fell for the famous Queen's Gambit Declined, Elephant Trap (the continuation in this line is good for black).



    For some reason, I didn't draw much happiness from this trap-n-win. I won because he was a piece less and I felt like I didn't learn anything new from this game.

    When he resigned, I shook hands with him and was about to say 'Its a trap', he blurted out 'I can't believe I fell for the elephant trap'. 😀

    - I didn't like the way the chess pieces were handled by some kids. They used to bang the board while making a move or shove the piece away from the table while capturing. But then kids are kids and its their trainers/parents/mentors responsibility to teach them.
  2. Standard member randolph
    the walrus
    28 Feb '11 06:19
    Congrats on a plus score in your first tournament. Regarding the trap-n-win thing, I think eventually you realize that you have to take some happiness from that kind of win because you'll feel pretty terrible after losing like that (and it WILL happen, if you continue to play) and need to balance it out.
  3. 28 Feb '11 14:50 / 2 edits
    Hi Ramp.

    Glad to see you appeared to have enjoyed playing in your first tournament.
    Clock skill at the board has to be experienced, you cannot pick that up
    reading about it (or playing v a computer).

    "I had plenty of time on my clock. This is a good sign because
    I have prepared on the opening lines well"

    Most first time clock always have loads of time left.

    I did. In my first ever tournament game with a clock I had
    used less that two minutes...I won...it was opening trap.

    In the games after that though I never came nowhere near using
    up my full quota of time and I blundered in a won position thus
    stopping me from sharing 2nd place my first ever tournment.

    The clock takes over from the board. This will soon pass.
    Get a load of 5 minute OTB games under your belt.
    (not blitz games on the net or v a computer).
    Over the board v a human.

    If you have the score of a lose go through it and look for the silly blunder
    or the good shot that was missed because you never took your time.

    An excellent score though first time out 4/3 . The future looks good.

    Never feel bad about a player blundering in the opening and
    you scoring a quick win.
    In this case a rest in a 7 round event is always welcome.

    4...Nbd7 is not an opening trap.


    It is a recommended theorectical move which hides a pitfall
    for the unwary and clumsy to fall into.
    More than 50 players on here have fallen into it.

    There is a difference.
    A true opening trap often discards opening principles and carries
    an element of risk should the trap fail.
    See the game below for a perfect example. It was my first tournament game.

    There is nothing at all wrong with 4...Nbd7.

    It's not all done and dusted after White has blundered.
    Most Whites on here have resigned right away or a few moves later.

    However after:

    1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Nbd7 5. cxd5 exd5 6. Nxd5 Nxd5
    7. Bxd8 Bb4+ 8. Qd2 Bxd2+ 9. Kxd2 Kxd8 10. e4



    I as White would not be thinking of resigning in a blitz or allegro game.
    I have two centre pawns and a ½ open c-file to play with.
    I have the bite (a tempo on the Knight) and no future development problems.
    I'm winning! 😉

    I mentioned 50+ players have tripped themselves by blundering
    into this theorectical trap. Not all have been Black wins.

    Game 3056030 and Game 432606 are just two examples
    from RHP where White has slip up, lost the piece but went onto win.
    And remember here players have days to make.

    Chandler - Mackie, Germany 1972.

  4. 28 Feb '11 15:25 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by RamP
    It was a 7 round Swiss System pairing. 25 minutes per player per game. 108 players turned up for this event.

    I won 4, lost 3. Some trivia below.

    - My first OTB Tournament and with a clock. I was terribly uncomfortable using the clock for the first two rounds.

    - All my losses were because of my big blunders. So, my target is to get my blunder count to kids are kids and its their trainers/parents/mentors responsibility to teach them.
    I didn't like the way the chess pieces were handled by some kids. They used to bang the board while making a move or shove the piece away from the table while capturing. But then kids are kids and its their trainers/parents/mentors responsibility to teach them. - ramP

    Its that type of mentality which puts me off joining a chess club and entering tournaments. I cannot handle ungentlemanly conduct, id just lose it myself and grab the little urchin and wipe the board with his face! and if his dad/trainer/mentors said anything about it, they'd get it as well! Cads and bounders! 🙂
  5. 28 Feb '11 15:39
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    Its that type of mentality which puts me off joining a chess club and entering tournaments. I cannot handle ungentlemanly conduct, id just lose it myself and grab the little urchin and wipe the board with his face! and if his dad/trainer/mentors said anything about it, they'd get it as well! Cads and bounders! 🙂
    But just look at what you're missing by not playing in tournaments. No war stories collected about opponents screwing pieces into the board, having rank body odor, clumsy attempts at cheating or annoying you. Certainly those stories are worth something to us in our old age?
  6. 28 Feb '11 16:20
    Originally posted by Mad Rook
    But just look at what you're missing by not playing in tournaments. No war stories collected about opponents screwing pieces into the board, having rank body odor, clumsy attempts at cheating or annoying you. Certainly those stories are worth something to us in our old age?
    yes its a very valid argument Rook sir. I once read, i think it was on here, about a young girl asking her opponent if he was reading any chess books at the moment, hoping that he would reach into his bag , display the books and get himself disqualified. The whole psychology of the thing puts me off for i am not that competitive by nature and fairly placid until i perceive an injustice. Its a real pity for i would love to play OTB chess.
  7. 28 Feb '11 17:05
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    yes its a very valid argument Rook sir. I once read, i think it was on here, about a young girl asking her opponent if he was reading any chess books at the moment, hoping that he would reach into his bag , display the books and get himself disqualified. The whole psychology of the thing puts me off for i am not that competitive by nature and fairly placid until i perceive an injustice. Its a real pity for i would love to play OTB chess.
    Who says you have to go in for all the serious tournament stuff? You could still join a club and play for fun without all the gamesmanship. In effect, that is what you are doing on RHP. This cannot be described as the serious end of correspondence chess despite all the hoo hah over using silicon assistance and pretending to be someone else.
  8. 28 Feb '11 17:31
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    yes its a very valid argument Rook sir. I once read, i think it was on here, about a young girl asking her opponent if he was reading any chess books at the moment, hoping that he would reach into his bag , display the books and get himself disqualified. The whole psychology of the thing puts me off for i am not that competitive by nature and fairly placid until i perceive an injustice. Its a real pity for i would love to play OTB chess.
    Maybe I've just been lucky so far, but I've actually run across very few problem opponents; The vast majority play fair. I suspect it's a case of always hearing the horror stories and never hearing about the uneventful games.
  9. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    28 Feb '11 17:49
    Originally posted by Mad Rook
    Maybe I've just been lucky so far, but I've actually run across very few problem opponents; The vast majority play fair. I suspect it's a case of always hearing the horror stories and never hearing about the uneventful games.
    At our local club here in Allentown Pa, the great majority of players are very polite, only one curmudgeon I ran into and that was not a game I played just his grousing afterwards, I think the guy was actively neurotic. Everyone else is totally polite.
  10. Standard member hedonist
    peacedog's keeper
    28 Feb '11 23:05
    Originally posted by Mad Rook
    Maybe I've just been lucky so far, but I've actually run across very few problem opponents; The vast majority play fair. I suspect it's a case of always hearing the horror stories and never hearing about the uneventful games.
    Thats my experience as well.

    Never had any trouble during or after a game. Even the ones who give of aggressive body language during the game, tend to be gentlemen afterwards.

    Played in a lot of congresses over the years and only seen one argument between players. Not bad when you consider that must be out of thousands of games.

    You get a lot more agro playing online, when hiding behind a keyboard makes some people very brave. Though I have to say, the RHP lot seem a lot better than on other chess servers.
  11. 01 Mar '11 01:23
    @GP, Thanks a lot for the tips. I will try to play more OTB from now on. Unfortunately, I didn't take notes of my moves. It would've definitely helped. I will do going forward.

    @Robbie, Yes, kids are very competitive but that girl trying to get her opponent disqualified falls into the category of crookedness 🙂.

    @Madrook, Regarding incidents during a tournament, there was one amusing argument. A girl (15 - 16 years) was outplayed in the middle game by a 9 year old boy. The boy was a piece up. The girl had very little time left on her clock.

    After some moves, the girl managed to win the extra piece and had a passed pawn. It was the girl's move and checkmate-on-next-move, when she ran out of time.

    The girl and her siblings started arguing saying that its check mate. The smart 9 year old kid had already stopped the clock and called the arbiter.

    The arbiter asked the girl only one question 'Did you have time on clock?' She replied 'No, but...'. The arbiter stopped her and said 'Time-out win for the kid' and walked away. The girl and her siblings were a furious lot 😀
  12. 01 Mar '11 02:04
    it's a pity the thread kind of taken over by the negative side of tournaments.

    Honestly there is nothing quite like it.
    The adrenalin rush is fantastic and everyone else is getting the same buzz.

    The blunders and the brilliancys you see in the analysis room.
    The way a crowd of onlookers can suddenly appear around a board where
    'something' is going to happen.

    I have heard this described like a crash in a desert.
    There is no one around for 200 miles. you hit a rock and suddeny
    a crowd of rubber necks appear.

    The book stall and all the free advice you are given from GM's to novices.
    The time scrambles, the excuses, the happiness, the misery....

    But the greatest thing for me is, you are in a room full of chess players.

    Recording a game in an allegro can be time consuming.
    Catch the first 15 or moves then drop it.
    Complete it after the game.
  13. Standard member hedonist
    peacedog's keeper
    01 Mar '11 02:29
    You are so right GP.

    Just to be in a room where everyone speaks the same language, chess, gives me a buzz. I dont go to my local club to play, more to hear about this guy meeting Korchnoi ect.

    And chess is great when you travel. You could be in the most dangerous city in the most dangerous country in the world. But if you meet some guys on a street corner playing chess, you got some friends. Just dont play for cash:-)
  14. 01 Mar '11 02:42
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    it's a pity the thread kind of taken over by the negative side of tournaments.

    Honestly there is nothing quite like it.
    The adrenalin rush is fantastic and everyone else is getting the same buzz.

    The blunders and the brilliancys you see in the analysis room.
    The way a crowd of onlookers can suddenly appear around a board where
    'something' is goi ...[text shortened]... n be time consuming.
    Catch the first 15 or moves then drop it.
    Complete it after the game.
    The book stall and all the free advice you are given from GM's to novices.
    The time scrambles, the excuses, the happiness, the misery....

    But the greatest thing for me is, you are in a room full of chess players.


    I did experience this 🙂 It was fantastic.

    But after I finished my games, only 2 of my opponents were kind enough to discuss and analyze.

    Maybe thats the mood of a tournament 🙂
  15. 01 Mar '11 02:43
    i played at the chess palace last sunday.