Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Only Chess Forum

Only Chess Forum

  1. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    20 Dec '09 14:23 / 1 edit
    Where does the novice chess player go today for answers to the many questions he (or she) has? Advise from stronger players, the internet, the local library or book store are all possible sources. The typical novice player will spend much time and money searching for the tools they need get off to a smooth start, and to train themselves to be competitive. It seems to me that the vast majority of those answers could be contained in one book, but to my knowledge, it does not exist. I believe such a book is possible. Chapters could include:

    1. Board set up, how the pieces move and capture, rules of the game, chess notation. (10-20 pages)

    2. Tactics, such as pins, deflections, windmills, double attacks (40-50 pages)

    3. Positional play, such as The center, over protection, blockades, passed pawns, open files (40-50 pages)

    4. Endgames lessons with tests and answer key in the back of the book. (40-50 pages)

    5. Openings: A brief overview of all the major openings and defences (about 75 pages)

    6. Solitare chess: The art of studying chess positions and trying to find a strong move, answer key in the back of the book (about 75 pages)

    7. Ratings and etiquette: A brief overview of ratings systems, and there relations to one's playing strength, as well as a lesson on chess etiquette, regarding both over the board and correspondence chess. (about 10-15 pages)

    8. Organizations: A reference guide to all national and international chess organizations, complete with mailing address's (both e mail and postal mail) and websites. This chapter should be in two parts. the first, over the board organizations. the second, correspondence organizations. (about 30 pages)

    9. History: A brief history of both over the board and correspondence chess, listing past and present world champions. (about 20 pages)

    10. Illustrative games: Perhaps 50 or so games hand picked for there instructional value, with annotations. (about 80 pages)

    None of these topics listed above need be in exhastive detail, and I'm sure I've missed a point or two, but a book of this kind will give the novice player a one volume source of information. I believe this is possible in a book of perhaps 400-450 pages at a modest price, saving both time and money. If any publishers read this. It might be an idea for you.
  2. 20 Dec '09 17:46
    There are some books around that come close in content and purpose to what you describe: (there's probably others for those who want to look around)

    Teach Yourself Chess (William Hartston).
    The Logical Approach to Chess (Euwe, Blaine, Rumble). This book in descriptive notation is out of print but available from several sellers on Amazon. Some may not like the older notation, but the book is excellent.
    Chess for Dummies.
    The Complete Idiot's Guide to Chess.

    Lots of people seem to be put off by the last two because of the titles. I guess they assume that the author(s) view the reader as stupid. Not so. For the complete beginner, these books will get them going in the right direction and teach them some history of the game.

    Here's another suggestion. If you've got what you think is a good idea for a book, pitch it to publishers yourself directly. The catch is you need a draft manuscript of the proposed book for a publisher to review. Book companies aren't in the business of supplying authors to flesh out ideas. If you can't or don't want to write the book you describe, maybe you can find someone to help you.
  3. 20 Dec '09 17:58
    Try looking up the "Mammoth Book of Chess", it covers a lot of content, including the rules of the game...and it's a really long book
  4. 20 Dec '09 20:11
    Hi

    A stated, The Mammoth Book of Chess has all that and more. A lot more.

    It really is the perfect chess book. There are a few copies on ebay.

    Highly recommended.
  5. Standard member Nowakowski
    10. O-O
    20 Dec '09 20:44 / 2 edits
    One book is difficult... but a combo of a very very short book...with a very very
    good book....

    Capablanca's Chess Fundamentals
    Followed by:
    Dvoretsky's Analytical Manual: Practical Training for the Ambitious Chessplayer
  6. 20 Dec '09 21:24 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Nowakowski
    One book is difficult... but a combo of a very very short book...with a very very
    good book....

    Capablanca's Chess Fundamentals
    Followed by:
    Dvoretsky's Analytical Manual: Practical Training for the Ambitious Chessplayer
    for beginners???? does a mum give a baby solid food, no, for she realises that it needs milk until it is mature enough for solid food.
  7. 20 Dec '09 21:32
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    for beginners???? does a mum give a baby solid food, no, for she realises that it needs milk until it is mature enough for solid food.
    What?
    They didn't teach you quantum mechanics in kindergarten?
  8. Standard member orion25
    Art is hard
    20 Dec '09 21:44
    Dvoretsky is very very hard even for me and I have been studying for a year now...
  9. 20 Dec '09 22:23 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Ajuin
    What?
    They didn't teach you quantum mechanics in kindergarten?
    lol, no i had a book about a caterpillar who used to measure things by crawling along them! inchworm his name was
  10. Standard member Nowakowski
    10. O-O
    20 Dec '09 22:31
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    for beginners???? does a mum give a baby solid food, no, for she realises that it needs milk until it is mature enough for solid food.
    Then be stuck on all fours crawling about like a baby.
    The fact is you won't understand any of it if your so willing to give up.



    This book by Dvoretsky is not nearly as difficult as his endgame manuals, and I would
    say its simplified even from his future Grand champion series. If you want to see some
    impressive gains, and greatly increase your knowledge, then Dvoretsky's writing is the
    very best for you.

    -GIN
  11. 20 Dec '09 22:59
    Originally posted by Nowakowski
    Then be stuck on all fours crawling about like a baby.
    The fact is you won't understand any of it if your so willing to give up.



    This book by Dvoretsky is not nearly as difficult as his endgame manuals, and I would
    say its simplified even from his future Grand champion series. If you want to see some
    impressive gains, and greatly increase your knowledge, then Dvoretsky's writing is the
    very best for you.

    -GIN
    No way. Do you ever remember the day you were 1100? dvoretsky is probably the worst recommendation I can think of for a beginner.
  12. 20 Dec '09 23:15
    Originally posted by philidor position
    Do you ever remember the day you were 1100?
    It seems like yesterday. Wait a minute ... it WAS yesterday
  13. 20 Dec '09 23:26
    I have a spare Mammoth.

    First person living in the UK to PM me his/hers address gets it free
    as a Chritsmas present.

    Hurry tomorrow is the last day to catch the post before Christmas.
  14. 20 Dec '09 23:33
    Originally posted by heinzkat
    It seems like yesterday. Wait a minute ... it WAS yesterday
    Lol, very subtle!
  15. Standard member Nowakowski
    10. O-O
    20 Dec '09 23:37 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by philidor position
    No way. Do you ever remember the day you were 1100? dvoretsky is probably the worst recommendation I can think of for a beginner.
    The poster is in the 1500's, and after looking over some of his games briefly, I think
    an analysis workbook would probably suit him very well.

    Capablanca's chess fundamentals, while a small book, can easily teach players to stop
    all of the bad habits they have at the "1100" level. Moving through Capa's endings at the
    end of the book, and finishing it with understanding of the chapters, is enough to break
    1500 in itself rather easily. Once the fundamentals have been thuroughly understood
    from capa's book, there really is no doubt in my mind that the Dvoretsky book is
    simplified enough for a player coming off with the good habits Capa teaches.

    Have you read this book philidor?
    Are you just assuming that because its Dvoretsky that its just simply too difficult?


    To many Pandolfini children now-a-days, wanting there lessons handed to them with
    cookies and milk. Dvoretsky may be a bit tough in some of his books, but he breeds
    the very best chess minds through his teachings.


    -GIN