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  1. 29 Jan '07 04:02
    I've been experimenting a bit with it, just to see how I like the positions that arise from it and potentially even start using it (I know...I know...)anyhow, how much theory does there seem to be involved with it? And what are whites most popular variations that YOU have faced IN PRACTICE. I know what the most popular theoretical variations are, but those tend to differ from what amateur's generally practice.
  2. 29 Jan '07 04:04
    Originally posted by cmsMaster
    I've been experimenting a bit with it, just to see how I like the positions that arise from it and potentially even start using it (I know...I know...)anyhow, how much theory does there seem to be involved with it? And what are whites most popular variations that YOU have faced IN PRACTICE. I know what the most popular theoretical variations are, but those tend to differ from what amateur's generally practice.
    Very little theory. There is this great video by Roman D, on it. In that video he goes over White and Black Rep. and it was great. The white rep. sucks though so I didn't use it.

    In OTB and Rhp I got the usual variation but blitz, lots of strange moves.

    You should also check out the Bogo Indian. Both are very similar.
  3. 29 Jan '07 04:12
    Originally posted by RahimK
    Very little theory. There is this great video by Roman D, on it. In that video he goes over White and Black Rep. and it was great. The white rep. sucks though so I didn't use it.

    In OTB and Rhp I got the usual variation but blitz, lots of strange moves.

    You should also check out the Bogo Indian. Both are very similar.
    Yeah, that was the plan.

    Glad to know it's little theory, I was thinking of just studying Qc2/e3 vars.
  4. 29 Jan '07 04:13
    Originally posted by cmsMaster
    I've been experimenting a bit with it, just to see how I like the positions that arise from it and potentially even start using it (I know...I know...)anyhow, how much theory does there seem to be involved with it? And what are whites most popular variations that YOU have faced IN PRACTICE. I know what the most popular theoretical variations are, but those tend to differ from what amateur's generally practice.
    Mostly Leningrad and classical. I'd recommend the Aagaard DVD which is well worth the $30. The new 'Dangerous Weapons: The Nimzo-Indian" is good.
  5. Standard member Korch
    Chess Warrior
    29 Jan '07 04:25
    Originally posted by RahimK
    Very little theory. There is this great video by Roman D, on it. In that video he goes over White and Black Rep. and it was great. The white rep. sucks though so I didn't use it.

    In OTB and Rhp I got the usual variation but blitz, lots of strange moves.

    You should also check out the Bogo Indian. Both are very similar.
    Nimzo - Indian is very popular well-explored opening and you are talking such kind of BS as "very little theory".....
  6. 29 Jan '07 04:26
    Originally posted by Korch
    Nimzo - Indian is very popular well-explored opening and you are talking such kind of BS as "very little theory".....
    I think he meant it differently than you're interpreting - I'm thinking there are just a few main lines to be studied without many side vars. but I could be wrong here.
  7. Standard member Korch
    Chess Warrior
    29 Jan '07 04:38 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by cmsMaster
    I think he meant it differently than you're interpreting - I'm thinking there are just a few main lines to be studied without many side vars. but I could be wrong here.
    Possible answers against Nimzo-Indian (1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4)

    4.a3 (Saemish) - very sharp system
    4.e3 (Rubinstein) - positional system with many possible sidelines for both sides.
    4.Qc2 (Classical system) - well-explored system too.
    4.g3 (Romanishin) - interesting system, where black must know what to do for getting playable position.
    4.Nf3 - very flexible move, which can transpose in other systems, but have some independent lines.
    4.Bg5 (Leningrad line) - another sharp answer for white.
    4.Qb3 - old- fashioned system, theoritical rather harmless for black, but (as in other lines) black must know the right plan.
    4.Bd2 - harmless answer for white.
  8. 29 Jan '07 04:39
    Originally posted by Korch
    Nimzo - Indian is very popular well-explored opening and you are talking such kind of BS as "very little theory".....
    Woah Buddy! I don't remember seeing any of you postings until recently....

    Anywho, I watched the Video and I'm just repeating what GM Roman D. said. Compared to other openings, it is simple and easy to learn. Kings Indian, Grunfeld etc...

    After watching that Video a couple of times, 4 hours about. You are set. If you need a refresher course you can watch it again.

    Easy to learn dude. Well the way he recommended playing it. I've seen other masters play it slightly different pawn structure, piece placement etc...
  9. Standard member Korch
    Chess Warrior
    29 Jan '07 04:48
    Originally posted by RahimK
    Woah Buddy! I don't remember seeing any of you postings until recently....

    Anywho, I watched the Video and I'm just repeating what GM Roman D. said. Compared to other openings, it is simple and easy to learn. Kings Indian, Grunfeld etc...

    After watching that Video a couple of times, 4 hours about. You are set. If you need a refresher course you can wat ...[text shortened]... it. I've seen other masters play it slightly different pawn structure, piece placement etc...
    Knowing main ideas doesnt mean that you dont need to know theory. - Especially to such well-explored opening. Repeating what GM says is good, but dont forgot that he`s adressing it to public which understanding of openings are really low.
  10. 29 Jan '07 08:28
    I'd recommend Tony Kosten's book: Mastering the Nimzo Indian - £5 from the Chess and Bridge Shop in London. It explains about the typical positions and ideas and has only just over 20 whole games and very little theory to learn.

    As for putting it into practice, I'm probably at a similar stage to yourself in that I wouldn't be able to say what the next move is according to theory. However, I feel that I could have a good guess as I feel I have a grasp for a lot of the ideas.

    If this works it'll have been the most enjoyable way I've studied an opening.
  11. Standard member HomerJSimpson
    Renouned Grob Killer
    29 Jan '07 08:30
    Originally posted by tapestry
    I'd recommend Tony Kosten's book: Mastering the Nimzo Indian - £5 from the Chess and Bridge Shop in London. It explains about the typical positions and ideas and has only just over 20 whole games and very little theory to learn.

    As for putting it into practice, I'm probably at a similar stage to yourself in that I wouldn't be able to say what the next m ...[text shortened]... he ideas.

    If this works it'll have been the most enjoyable way I've studied an opening.
    I love tony kosten, his book the dynamic english is an excellent text
  12. Standard member HomerJSimpson
    Renouned Grob Killer
    29 Jan '07 08:35
    Originally posted by cmsMaster
    I've been experimenting a bit with it, just to see how I like the positions that arise from it and potentially even start using it (I know...I know...)anyhow, how much theory does there seem to be involved with it? And what are whites most popular variations that YOU have faced IN PRACTICE. I know what the most popular theoretical variations are, but those tend to differ from what amateur's generally practice.
    I think a good way to learn the nimzo indian is just to look through Weyerstrass' games, he makes chess look so simple, that you really dont have to have it anotated
  13. Standard member Diet Coke
    Forum Vampire
    29 Jan '07 08:50
    NI turns into the QID soo easily.

    Without stupid bishop move.

    Bb4/+ Pah!
  14. 29 Jan '07 16:43
    I think Qc2, a3 and e3 are the most popular responses.

    The leningrad is not that so common, considered by some worse than the other options white has.
  15. 29 Jan '07 16:48
    did you you read challengeing the nimzo. by IM david vigoritto.cmsmaster!