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  1. 31 Dec '13 18:55
    A Gryphon moves one square diagonally, followed by an arbitrary number of squares horizontally or vertically. It is authorized to go only one square diagonally. It may not jump over other pieces, and the unobstructed path must start with the diagonal movement.
    An Aanca moves one square horizontally or vertically, followed by an arbitrary number of squares diagonally. It is authorized to go only one square horizontally or vertically. It may not jump over other pieces, and the unobstructed path must start with the horizontal or vertical movement.

    And so my question is: On a 12x12 board, how much would a Gryphon and an Aanca be approximately worth?

    I've done some research, and I found a Gryphon would maybe be worth 7.8 points, while a Pawn would be worth 0.8 points, a Knight 2.5 points, a Bishop 3.4 points, a Rook 5.0 points, a Queen 8.3 points, and a Lion 7.3 points (a Lion can move to any of the 8 squares immediately adjacent like a King, or jump to any of the 16 squares two steps away).
    But I found nothing on the Aanca.

    If put on the middle of an empty 12x12 board, both Gryphon and Aanca would control 40 squares.
    So this may lead us to believe that an Aanca would be worth approximately 7.8 points too.

    But: 7.8 / 5.0 = 1.56 (5.0 being the number of points a Rook is worth)
    And: 3.4 x 1.56 = 5.3 (3.4 being the number of points a Bishop is worth)
    This leads us to believe that an Aanca is worth only 5.3 points. Maybe 5.4 if we take into account that the Bishop is colorbounded but the Aanca isn't (though on a 12x12 board colorboundedness isn't such a big problem since there are much more pieces than on a 8x8 board).

    So, 7.8 points or 5.4 points? How much is that damn Aanca worth?
  2. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    31 Dec '13 21:54
    Originally posted by Marc Benford
    A Gryphon moves one square diagonally, followed by an arbitrary number of squares horizontally or vertically. It is authorized to go only one square diagonally. It may not jump over other pieces, and the unobstructed path must start with the diagonal movement.
    An Aanca moves one square horizontally or vertically, followed by an arbitrary number of squ ...[text shortened]... pieces than on a 8x8 board).

    So, 7.8 points or 5.4 points? How much is that damn Aanca worth?
    WTF have you been smoking?
  3. 02 Jan '14 01:20
    Originally posted by Marc Benford
    ... and a Lion 7.3 points (a Lion can move to any of the 8 squares immediately adjacent like a King, or jump to any of the 16 squares two steps away) ...
    There's already a fairy (unorthodox) piece named the lion used in chess problems. It moves along the same lines as a queen, hops over another piece (a hurdle), and lands on a square beyond. A capture can occur on the destination square, but the hurdle remains unaffected.
  4. 02 Jan '14 02:34
    I don't like fairy chess pieces that get too weird in their movement abilities.

    I am happy using the orthodox chess pieces R,B,N as the "elements" (ignoring the king and pawn as they are special cases) and making combinations from them. We already have the queen (R+B) but Christian Freeling's Grand Chess adds the "marshall" (R+N) and "cardinal" (B+N).

    I would like to see a large variant that uses the R+B+N combo which can mate a lone king all by itself. I would call it the "empress" as it outclasses the queen. Traditionally it has been called the "amazon" which I dislike.
  5. 02 Jan '14 06:56
    Originally posted by homedepotov
    ... I am happy using the orthodox chess pieces R,B,N as the "elements" (ignoring the king and pawn as they are special cases) and making combinations from them ...
    You might be interested in Seirawan chess, which adds an elephant (rook-knight compound) and a hawk (bishop-knight compound) to the orthodox game: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seirawan_chess