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  1. 22 Jul '10 17:59
    I'm playing a rather good new player who has good vision but knows little Chess theory. I can't convince him to Castle. He can't see any value in it and wants to know why? It's been years since I've read a Chess book and I'm just getting back into it myself, this site is amazing! Anyone have something I could pass on to him?
  2. 22 Jul '10 18:06
    it generally gets your king safer, and your rook active. simple as that. of course there are exceptions.
  3. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    22 Jul '10 18:10 / 1 edit
    First and foremost, see Greepawn34's thread on castling to deliver mate!

    A rook in a corner only controls squares on the edge of the board. Castling is an efficient way of developing a rook, as it moves it closer to the center.

    A king on e8 can be attacked from 180 degrees. A king on h8 can only be attacked from 90 degrees. Castling gets you there quicker.

    Generally speaking, a castled position is far harder to attack than an uncastled position. Good players salivate when their opponent's king tarries in the center too long.

    And to be blunt, hundreds of years of chess theory have evolved to show the value of castling, every world champion has done it with extreme regularity, and all the strong players do almost as a routine.

    For a new player to think he knows better than these is arrogant stupidity -and I'm sure your friend is neither, but he should be warned about appearances. I speak from personal experience, as I was in his shoes once!

    If he's winning every game against really strong players, and hasn't lost to anyone, then he can get away with wearing ignorance as a badge of bravery for a bit, but good competition will cure him quickly.
  4. 22 Jul '10 18:34
    Originally posted by Paul Leggett
    but good competition will cure him quickly.
    Paul's last sentence nails it.Kill his king in the middle over and over and then once more.He'll soon realise there might be some use in castling.

    His results strengthen his believe.The way to go is to prove him wrong by results.
    This can of course be difficult to do 🙂

    toet.
  5. 22 Jul '10 18:51
    Karpov just before giving a simultaneous display in Scotland.

    Q:"Do you have any strategy when giving a simultaneous display?"

    Karpov: "First beat all those players who have not caslted then concentrate
    on the rest."

    But the only way for this lad to really learn is to get his uncastled
    King mated 6 or 7 times. Then the penny will drop.
  6. 22 Jul '10 19:05
    Of course while castling is generally recommended this isn't an absolute. Sometimes you should delay castling and develop/attack with other pieces. Sometimes your king is actually safer in the middle, and sometimes your rook is valuable on the h file.
  7. 22 Jul '10 19:44
    Wow!, Thanks for the immediate responses, I'm impressed!
    I told my new playing buddy to read your posts and if these don't convince him.....
  8. 22 Jul '10 20:30
    Here's what he said:

    "I read their posts. I think I might be looking at it incorrectly. Whereas I see fewer escape routes in case of attack.....they see fewer attack routes that would require attack".

    And thanks again for the prompt responses.
  9. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    22 Jul '10 20:36
    Originally posted by beetlebomb
    Here's what he said:

    "I read their posts. I think I might be looking at it incorrectly. Whereas I see fewer escape routes in case of attack.....they see fewer attack routes that would require attack".

    And thanks again for the prompt responses.
    When I lose a game to him in the future, I'm blaming you, just so you know!😕
  10. 22 Jul '10 23:53
    Who would have ever thought we would/could be literally reading our opponent's thoughts as we play? Unbelievable!
  11. 23 Jul '10 00:47
    This thread is funny and so true. My younger brother says castling is for people who are scared, and when I am beating him, which is always, he says I play like the French.
    I don't use the French defense and I am sure he doesn't know what the French defense is but he says that to me every game.
    I have tried to tell him, and show him, the error in his ways but he thinks his way must be the best. He also said studying chess is cheating! 🙄
  12. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    23 Jul '10 01:18
    Originally posted by gorookyourself
    This thread is funny and so true. My younger brother says castling is for people who are scared, and when I am beating him, which is always, he says I play like the French.
    I don't use the French defense and I am sure he doesn't know what the French defense is but he says that to me every game.
    I have tried to tell him, and show him, the error in his ways but he thinks his way must be the best. He also said studying chess is cheating! 🙄
    Castling is the only (legal) way you can move two pieces at one time.
  13. 23 Jul '10 01:22
    Originally posted by ChessPraxis
    Castling is the only (legal) way you can move two pieces at one time.
    e.p. En Passant?
  14. 23 Jul '10 01:22
    No. I am wrong. Sorry.
  15. 23 Jul '10 01:24
    I thought e.p. En Passant and removing the piece would count as two moves.