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  1. Standard member RECUVIC
    international loser
    27 Jan '14 04:07
    games in progress= skipstammy v recuvic. It may not be very likely but I thought it perhaps to be worthwhile asking the question? Is there anyone active on this chess site who is able to work out with or without the use of computer assistance how this perfectly legal but somewhat improbable but possible chess position may have evolved from the normal starting chess game layout? Obviously all 16 pawns were promoted to knights and all Q B and R exchanged during the game. Is it possible that the position is obtainable in more than one way? In our next games the set up will be with 10 bishops each then 10 rooks each and finally 9 Queens each side and of course always one king each side, all being the maximum chess legally possible .As in any chess game the objective both sides is to achieve checkmate. Is it possible to achieve such improbabilities with deliberate co-operation from both players? Does anyone believe they have the answers to the relevant questions. If so I would be pleased to hear from them and how they arrived at their answers. No, I do not have the answers myself which is why I am asking the questions, perhaps somebody here is way smarter than me?? I feel sure somebody is? Any takers?? from recuvic to any real smart super brain number crunching genius! Bring it on if you have the answers!
  2. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    27 Jan '14 05:38 / 5 edits
    Promoting 16 pawns is fairly easy, though a bit tedious to watch.

  3. Standard member RECUVIC
    international loser
    27 Jan '14 10:32
    thank you for that instructive and informative display SG which is not in the least bit tedious! Obviously it is difficult to imagine why anyone would wish to go through all that let alone two players in the same game except of course as an interesting diversion or even as a somewhat peculiar method of improving ones knowledge of pawn play!? Promoting all 16 pawns to knights is also educational regarding the move of the knight in particular. Delivering checkmate from such a position is somewhat more problematic? Recuvic
  4. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    27 Jan '14 15:55
    Originally posted by RECUVIC
    thank you for that instructive and informative display SG which is not in the least bit tedious! Obviously it is difficult to imagine why anyone would wish to go through all that let alone two players in the same game except of course as an interesting diversion or even as a somewhat peculiar method of improving ones knowledge of pawn play!? Promoting all 16 ...[text shortened]... in particular. Delivering checkmate from such a position is somewhat more problematic? Recuvic
    You're right - there's no reason for the players to do this in a competitive game of chess. These kinds of questions come up more in chess problems, when the composer is using promoted force, yet trying to keep the position legal.