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  1. Standard member anthias
    ambitious player
    22 Aug '06 19:54
    After I learned how to move the pieces, I only worked on the endgame. No middlegame, no openings, just endgames. Thus when I started to go to a chess club, I immediately started to get pounded in blitz matches because I didn't know any openings or basic middlegame concepts- such as how to get rid of the knight pin on f3(f6) after you castled. It just took me a lot of time for me to think about the position, so I lost every single game because of time pressure. I dediced to learn some openings, as I started to dig some middlegame books (Barraging the Barricades and How to Reasses yor Chess, also with all of Sairawan's Winning Chess series).

    I started with the Italian Game as white, and Queen's Indian as black. What I ask you is: "What are the main 'plans' of these two openings?" I can surely look up some opening book to see this, but I just want to ask people who use these openings frequently.

    Note: It doesn't have to be only GP and QI, you can talk about any opening, and I'll see if I can work on it
  2. 22 Aug '06 23:47
    Originally posted by anthias
    After I learned how to move the pieces, I only worked on the endgame. No middlegame, no openings, just endgames. Thus when I started to go to a chess club, I immediately started to get pounded in blitz matches because I didn't know any openings or basic middlegame concepts- such as how to get rid of the knight pin on f3(f6) after you castled. It just took m ...[text shortened]... be only GP and QI, you can talk about any opening, and I'll see if I can work on it
    If you memorize Reuben Fine's The IDEAS BEHIND THE OPENINGS, GM Fine says you'll be no less than a master at minimum.
  3. 22 Aug '06 23:52
    Reuben always was a bit of a crackpot
  4. 23 Aug '06 00:02
    Originally posted by Gorgar
    Reuben always was a bit of a crackpot
    Yeah, I know. But, he sure could play good chess. hehe
  5. 23 Aug '06 00:02
    The Idea of the Giouco Piano is for white to try and bore black to death while hoping that he doesnt breeze his way to equality (which isn't too hard for him if he stays awake)
  6. 23 Aug '06 00:29 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by YUG0slav
    The Idea of the Giouco Piano is for white to try and bore black to death while hoping that he doesnt breeze his way to equality (which isn't too hard for him if he stays awake)
    In spite of its name, this opening is far from boring.
  7. Standard member anthias
    ambitious player
    24 Aug '06 16:58
    Any other ideas?
  8. 24 Aug '06 17:15
    Originally posted by anthias
    Any other ideas?
    Well,what is the main idea behind the Giuoco?I would say quick development,central control and an eye on Black's weakest spot f7.I guess there's a bit more to it than just that but I'm no expert.

    I don't know the Queens Indian.
  9. 24 Aug '06 18:43
    Originally posted by Gorgar
    Well,what is the main idea behind the Giuoco?I would say quick development,central control and an eye on Black's weakest spot f7.I guess there's a bit more to it than just that but I'm no expert.

    I don't know the Queens Indian.
    not just blacks weakspot but black eyes whites weakest spot f2
  10. 24 Aug '06 19:18
    Originally posted by tomtom232
    not just blacks weakspot but black eyes whites weakest spot f2
    Yes,if Black plays Bc5.Anyway,I thought we were looking at it from White's point of view.
  11. 24 Aug '06 19:20
    Originally posted by Gorgar
    Yes,if Black plays Bc5.Anyway,I thought we were looking at it from White's point of view.
    I am pretty sure he said he wanted to learn openings for white and black.
  12. Standard member anthias
    ambitious player
    24 Aug '06 19:33
    For example, in Yugoslav Attack, White tries to undermine Black's kingside with his h and g pawns, and maybe a rook sac.

    How about the Itailan Game?
  13. 25 Aug '06 01:06
    Originally posted by Gorgar
    Reuben always was a bit of a crackpot
    Crackpot or not, he was a genuis at chess and an excellent writer. Almost certainly the best American player to never win the U.S. Championship.

    His "Basic Chess Endings" remains a monumental contribution to chess, and he had to figure all the stuff out without help from Fritz!

    IMO, his "Chess the Easy Way" remains one of the best chess primers of all time.