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  1. 23 Dec '05 21:24
    when you are a beginner i know you should study tactics. but what about after youre done with tactics. what is the order of things you study after youre done with tactics? (i.e. 1.opening 2.endgame ect.) i know im not quite past the tactics well not at all past the tactics im just wondering about what is after that.
  2. 23 Dec '05 21:25
    Originally posted by trallphaz
    when you are a beginner i know you should study tactics. but what about after youre done with tactics. what is the order of things you study after youre done with tactics? (i.e. 1.opening 2.endgame ect.) i know im not quite past the tactics well not at all past the tactics im just wondering about what is after that.
    I think after tactics you are supposed to study endgames.
  3. 23 Dec '05 21:26
    1.tactics 2.tactics 3.endgames 4.stragegy and middlegame stuff 5.openings

    O course play decent openings. Don't play stuff like 1.h4 or 1.a4 and dumb stuff.
  4. 23 Dec '05 21:32
    Originally posted by RahimK
    O course play decent openings. Don't play stuff like 1.h4 or 1.a4 and dumb stuff.
    i know that
  5. 23 Dec '05 22:26
    Originally posted by trallphaz
    when you are a beginner i know you should study tactics. but what about after youre done with tactics. what is the order of things you study after youre done with tactics? (i.e. 1.opening 2.endgame ect.) i know im not quite past the tactics well not at all past the tactics im just wondering about what is after that.
    It's a little like saying "I know primary school students should start with reading, but what subject should they study when they're done with reading?" as though they should master Shakespeare before being introduced to basic math. You are never "done with tactics". Yes at beginner and intermediate levels it is usually best to put heavy emphasis on tactics. In terms of playing strength gained vs. time spent studying for almost anyone this will give you the highest return. To a complete novice I would recommend reading a book devoted to tactics, one that explains the tactical themes, as maybe the second or third book one reads (after one or two that explain the rules and give a good overview). After this there should always be a book of tactical excercises that you are going through (again and again until you practically know each one on sight) a little each day from know until you're such a strong player that you'd be a fool to take advice from the likes of me. While this is going on, study other things as well. You need to know the basic endgames cold, learn the basics of your chosen openings, understand the elements of positional play and give some consideration to your thinking process. Playing over well annotated games of the masters should help with all of this and reinforce your others studies. Don't think, however, that you need to study any area of chess to mastery before you move on to others. If you learn the basics from an endgame book for example, don't feel bad about putting the more complicated stuff asside until later so that you can move on to something else. Above all, enjoy what you're studying. I don't know that anybody that didn't like chess ever got good at it.
  6. Standard member ark13
    Enola Straight
    23 Dec '05 22:29
    Originally posted by Skorj
    It's a little like saying "I know primary school students should start with reading, but what subject should they study when they're done with reading?" as though they should master Shakespeare before being introduced to basic math. You are never "done with tactics". Yes at beginner and intermediate levels it is usually best to put heavy emphasis on tac ...[text shortened]... y what you're studying. I don't know that anybody that didn't like chess ever got good at it.
    Finally someone who gives reasonable advice. Don't ever just study one aspect of the game. You should concentrate on certain areas more at different skill levels, but never neglect any entirely. Without strategy, you won't be able to use your tactics. Without some opening principles, your position won't afford you the opportunity to use tactics. Without endgame skill, what you win as a result of tactics won't be converted to a win.
  7. Standard member Bowmann
    Non-Subscriber
    23 Dec '05 22:55 / 1 edit
    1. LEARN THE RULES.

    2. Everything else.



    Note: There is no perfect "order" in which to practice no. 2. It comprises a combination of endgames, checkmates, board patterns, planning, and opening play. However, these things may be studied in this order.
  8. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    23 Dec '05 23:11
    Originally posted by trallphaz
    when you are a beginner i know you should study tactics. but what about after youre done with tactics. what is the order of things you study after youre done with tactics? (i.e. 1.opening 2.endgame ect.) i know im not quite past the tactics well not at all past the tactics im just wondering about what is after that.
    I've been playing for 37 years, and I'm not finished with tactics.
  9. Standard member Bowmann
    Non-Subscriber
    23 Dec '05 23:50
    Originally posted by Wulebgr
    I've been playing for 37 years, and I'm not finished with tactics.
    How far have you got, grandad?