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  1. Standard member Daphnes
    Rusty Veteran
    27 May '07 13:34
    I've seen people move pawns so that they line up diagonally down the board. I read in one thread where someone said you should try to play one color instead of both.

    So this has me thinking, is this a really good strategy? It seems alright, but is it better than the horizontal zigzag pattern?
  2. Standard member Phlabibit
    Mystic Meg
    27 May '07 14:55
    Originally posted by Daphnes
    I've seen people move pawns so that they line up diagonally down the board. I read in one thread where someone said you should try to play one color instead of both.

    So this has me thinking, is this a really good strategy? It seems alright, but is it better than the horizontal zigzag pattern?
    If you have a zig-zag, any pawn in the back is unprotected. The strongest pawn chains and islands are diagonal on a color opposite any remaining bishops, or with the back pawn being covered by a piece or more.

    If it's a zig-zag, you need pieces covering the back ones. If one piece is covering 2, an attack on both my draw your piece off one and it could be captured.

    P-
  3. Standard member Daphnes
    Rusty Veteran
    27 May '07 16:00
    Ok. I'll see if I can make that work for me in a future game.
  4. 28 May '07 03:21
    Pawns are actually strongest when they are in a horizontal line, ie, they controll more squares, but usually it is dificult to do this without making them succeptable to attack. Therefore if you have them in a "chain" they are harder to attack, but also controll less squares, only one colour of square... if you want to hinder piece movement you have to be aware of where the enemy pieces can move. For instance, if you have a chain on white squares then a dark bishop can easily infiltrate that structure. So, its a bit more complicated than just saying to put them in a chain because they are harder to attack, you have to have a reason and a plan. One other thing is that a chain is more of an anchor to support your pieces. The squares these pawns controll are called outposts.