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  1. Standard member congruent
    Chess Player
    27 Apr '13 07:55
    What sort of prep do you do particularly when playing against 2000-2300 players OTB who you do not know beforehand what openings they will play? Have a set preparation of openings?
  2. 27 Apr '13 13:14
    How do you know that your opponents will be rated 2000+? How does your OTB rating compare?
  3. 27 Apr '13 13:47
    Originally posted by congruent
    What sort of prep do you do particularly when playing against 2000-2300 players OTB who you do not know beforehand what openings they will play? Have a set preparation of openings?
    If you don't know your opponents at all, all you need is general preparation. In other words, just double check whatever critical variations you plan to play out of your standard repetoire.

    If you know your opponents, you can try to prepare special variations for them. I wouldn't spend a lot of time doing this, but it can be worth a little bit. I had one tournament where I knew one of my 2300 opponents played the Leningrad Dutch defense and prepared a Sicilian reversed against it, instead of a staight Dutch, and got 1/2 point out of it (I was 1900 at the time and quite happy with this). Even better, I got to use the same variation against another 2300 a few weeks later with the same results.
  4. Standard member congruent
    Chess Player
    27 Apr '13 19:07
    Originally posted by gezza
    How do you know that your opponents will be rated 2000+? How does your OTB rating compare?
    If you are playing in matches or tournaments, your opponents are ranked in order of strength. The obvious general exception to this rule would be the Olympiad if you are one of the top players for your country (a smaller country), and you face one of the top teams who are all titled.
  5. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    27 Apr '13 19:56
    Originally posted by congruent
    What sort of prep do you do particularly when playing against 2000-2300 players OTB who you do not know beforehand what openings they will play? Have a set preparation of openings?
    You playing 2300 players in a simul? That would take weeks!
  6. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    28 Apr '13 03:11
    Originally posted by congruent
    What sort of prep do you do particularly when playing against 2000-2300 players OTB who you do not know beforehand what openings they will play? Have a set preparation of openings?
    Prepare a general repetoire that has a good reputation for success, because if your opponent has that high an OTB rating, he is probably not going to play an inferior opening. You would want to come out of the opening with at least an even position in order to give yourself a chance for a draw.

    So I am not the kind of person that would try playing any gambits against players rated higher. The Queen Gambit is different, if you have studied this opening extensively and feel comfortable with it.

    So the best thing to do, in this case, is just study up on those solid openings that you feel comfortable playing up to the middle game, so hopely you can be at least even there. The rest is going to depend on how well you can recognize the tactics you have studied and if you know your endgame.
  7. Standard member woodypusher
    misanthrope
    28 Apr '13 03:30 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by congruent
    What sort of prep do you do particularly when playing against 2000-2300 players OTB who you do not know beforehand what openings they will play? Have a set preparation of openings?
    I don't do it myself but some people play openings that the same moves can be played regardless of opponents' responses.

    For instance, a player at my old chess club played the King's Indian Attack exclusively. He had pretty good success with it and didn't need extensive prep before a game. Just don't memorize moves though, try to understand the ideas behind the opening you choose.

    Normally, you wouldn't want to immediately simplify to an endgame as their advantage becomes more concrete and easier to convert.

    Either that or eat anchovies before the game.
  8. Standard member congruent
    Chess Player
    28 Apr '13 08:41
    There are guys who try and play one system against everything they face OTB and this may work against equal or lower-ranked players. I would not go down that route. I would rather be adventurous and face an exciting battle only in the post-game analysis the player to tell me that is the Chicago defense for example.

    Part of the fun is that we face or play so called "inferior openings" not usually seen at GM level but having enough potency to be an issue at club/tournament level.
  9. 28 Apr '13 10:36 / 1 edit
    Forget all this opening crude.
    Let them worry about what opening you are going to play.

    This is the opening you should play. The first metting gambit.

    No matter how famous they think they are always ask them for their name.
    Then get them to spell it out for you.
    Ask them their grade, look very surprised at the answer and write '?' in the
    space for grading on the score sheet.

    When the game starts make a big show of putting on a glove on your right hand.
    Look away and offer your hand for the tradtional handshake.

    When you take one of his pawns or pieces toss it over your shoulder.

    There is nothing in the FIDE rule book to say you cannot cut your toe nails during the game
    so take along a pair of scissors and drop the bits on his side of the board.
  10. Standard member congruent
    Chess Player
    28 Apr '13 17:52 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Forget all this opening crude.
    Let them worry about what opening you are going to play.
    Opening crude? Is that a new line in the Nimzo? I quite like the Rubinstein.
  11. Standard member woodypusher
    misanthrope
    28 Apr '13 18:48 / 2 edits
    Wear glasses with no lenses in them. Every now and then rub your eye through the frames.

    During his moves say "adjust" and screw the piece into the board.

    During your moves hover your hand over the piece for long periods of time, then move another piece. This works especially well if the piece you hover over has no legal moves.

    Buy a fart noise maker and occasionally walk out into the hallway and use it. When you return to the board don't say anything.
  12. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    29 Apr '13 03:59
    Originally posted by congruent
    What sort of prep do you do particularly when playing against 2000-2300 players OTB who you do not know beforehand what openings they will play? Have a set preparation of openings?
    I would choose 1 opening for white, and 2 defences for black (one against e4 and 1 aginst d4). Spend about 20-30% of study time on openings, 50-60% of study time on tactics, and the rest on your endgames. Save a few hours of prep time with a few games against a fairly strong computer program under tournament time controls. Keep in mind, you can't prepare for everything you might encounter over the board, so don't try.
  13. 29 Apr '13 11:04
    If in the habit of regularly meeting 2200+ players then you should have
    a fairly good understanding of what openings you play.

    Against an unknown simply play what you play. If per chance you stumble
    on the fact he plays a doubled-edged risky variation of the KID and you are
    going through a 1.e4 phase, do not swot up for an hour before the game and play
    1.d4 he will know all the wee nuances in the position that you (and your computer
    will not spot.).

    By that I mean if there is a unsound piece sac for Black that creates masses
    of OTB problems for the White player to solve OTB the box won't even suggest
    it as a try.
    So there you are looking at position very unfamiliar to you and you can
    see trick 'n' traps all over the place.
    Meanwhile your opponent who is already ahead on the clock has a position
    he has most likely had before (and won so people before you have failed).

    I have had experience of this although v under 2000 players.
    1.d4 players would take on my Latvian armed with one book line.
    (Then tell me in analysis room after I've won that I did not play the best moves).

    Or 1.e4 players playing 1.d4 to avoid the Latvian or playing a King's Gambit
    for the first time in their lives to be met with the Falkbeer Counter Gambit.
  14. 29 Apr '13 16:56
    Originally posted by congruent
    If you are playing in matches or tournaments, your opponents are ranked in order of strength. The obvious general exception to this rule would be the Olympiad if you are one of the top players for your country (a smaller country), and you face one of the top teams who are all titled.
    So your OTB rating is in the 2000+ range?

    Perhaps you could comment on what you have done until now. It can't be all wrong, and might help others.
  15. Standard member congruent
    Chess Player
    29 Apr '13 18:13
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    If in the habit of regularly meeting 2200+ players then you should have
    a fairly good understanding of what openings you play.

    Against an unknown simply play what you play. If per chance you stumble
    on the fact he plays a doubled-edged risky variation of the KID and you are
    going through a 1.e4 phase, do not swot up for an hour before the game and ...[text shortened]... ing's Gambit
    for the first time in their lives to be met with the Falkbeer Counter Gambit.
    I wouldn't risk the falkbeer countergambit but I agree on your other points.