Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Only Chess Forum

Only Chess Forum

  1. 26 Sep '12 03:47 / 2 edits
    I thought it'd be fun to post the occasional chess problem. In the following problem, white plays first and checkmates black in two moves. Enjoy!

    J. Haring
    1st prize
    Arbejder Skak 1960-II

    #2

    I'll post the solution in a day or two.
  2. 26 Sep '12 05:22
    Originally posted by Linden Lyons
    I thought it'd be fun to post the occasional chess problem. In the following problem, white plays first and checkmates black in two moves. Enjoy!

    J. Haring
    1st prize
    Arbejder Skak 1960-II
    [fen]2B5/8/4N1r1/2Kp4/3pkP2/R2N3Q/4b1P1/6b1 w - - 0 1[/fen]
    #2

    I'll post the solution in a day or two.
    1.Kb4


    Too easy.
  3. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    26 Sep '12 06:38
    Originally posted by tomtom232
    [hidden]1.Kb4[/hidden]

    Too easy.
    I think it is a very hard one to see.
  4. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    26 Sep '12 07:29
    Here is another White to move and mate in 2:

  5. 26 Sep '12 08:08 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    Here is another White to move and mate in 2:

    [fen] 2R5/8/3k4/3N2p1/4K1Q1/8/8/8 w - - [/fen]
    Is the following the solution?

    1 Kf5!
    1 ... Kd7 2 Ke5
    1 ... Kxd5 2 Qd1

    Who's the author of this problem?
  6. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    26 Sep '12 08:15 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Linden Lyons
    Is the following the solution?

    1 Kf5!
    1 ... Kd7 2 Ke5
    1 ... Kxd5 2 Qd1

    Who's the author of this problem?
    I don't know. It is from a games app that you can download to your cell phone.

    P.S. Yes, your solution is correct.
  7. 26 Sep '12 09:37
    Originally posted by Linden Lyons
    Who's the author of this problem?
    That's one of Sam Loyd's.
  8. Subscriber 64squaresofpain On Vacation
    The drunk knight
    26 Sep '12 13:51
    Originally posted by Linden Lyons
    I thought it'd be fun to post the occasional chess problem. In the following problem, white plays first and checkmates black in two moves. Enjoy!

    J. Haring
    1st prize
    Arbejder Skak 1960-II
    [fen]2B5/8/4N1r1/2Kp4/3pkP2/R2N3Q/4b1P1/6b1 w - - 0 1[/fen]
    #2

    I'll post the solution in a day or two.
    1. Ng5 Rxg5
    2. Qe6

    I think this is right, unless I missed something (?)
  9. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    26 Sep '12 13:53
    Originally posted by 64squaresofpain
    1. Ng5 Rxg5
    2. Qe6

    I think this is right, unless I missed something (?)
    2...Re5
  10. Subscriber 64squaresofpain On Vacation
    The drunk knight
    26 Sep '12 14:05
    Originally posted by SwissGambit
    2...Re5
    Knew i'd miss something.. but still mate in 3! lol
  11. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    26 Sep '12 17:22
    Originally posted by 64squaresofpain
    Knew i'd miss something.. but still mate in 3! lol
    That is good enough for OTB play for it does not matter if the checkmate is in 2 or 3 moves. You win anyway. So in this case, I say you are a winner. Congratulations! 🙂
  12. 26 Sep '12 19:06
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    I think it is a very hard one to see.
    Not if you know composed problems... a king move was the only key that looked promising, then you realize the only square the king can move without getting pinned to one of the potential mating knights (tehehe mating knights) is b4.
  13. 27 Sep '12 11:47
    Originally posted by tomtom232
    Not if you know composed problems... a king move was the only key that looked promising, then you realize the only square the king can move without getting pinned to one of the potential mating knights (tehehe mating knights) is b4.
    tomtom's exactly right. Here's the full solution:

    1 K~6? (threat 2 Ndc5, not 2 Nec5?)
    1 ... Rg4 2 Nec5
    but 1 ... Bg4!

    1 Kb5? (threat 2 Nec5, not 2 Ndc5?)
    1 ... Bf3 2 Ndc5
    but 1 ... Rg3!

    1 Kb4! (threat 2 Ndc5 and 2 Nec5)
    1 ... Rg3/Bf3 2 Ndc5
    1 ... Bg4/Rg4 2 Nec5
    1 ... Rxe6 2 Qxe6
    1 ... Bxd3 2 Qxd3