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  1. 26 Oct '12 01:13
    White mates in two moves:

    Robert A. Lincoln
    StrateGems
    July-September 2003

    #2
  2. 26 Oct '12 05:24 / 3 edits
    N g4 - Q e2 and or Qe6


    excuse the missing pawn
  3. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    26 Oct '12 05:56
    Originally posted by Linden Lyons
    White mates in two moves:

    Robert A. Lincoln
    StrateGems
    July-September 2003
    [fen]8/3B4/8/6K1/2Qpk3/8/6P1/8[/fen]
    #2
    This problem is kinda weak. Pg2 is not strictly necessary, and the solution is too simple.
  4. 26 Oct '12 07:00
    Originally posted by SwissGambit
    This problem is kinda weak. Pg2 is not strictly necessary, and the solution is too simple.
    Hi SG.

    Perhaps you're right, but on the other hand I think it's a clear depiction of the Dombrovskis theme: in one try threat X is defeated by x, and in another try threat Y is defeated by y, then in the post-key play, x leads to X and y leads to Y.

    I'll see if I can find a tripling or quadrupling of this theme. Anyway, here's the full solution:

    1 Be6? (threat Qe2)
    1 ... Ke5 2 Qd5
    but 1 ... Ke3!

    1 Bb5? (threat Qe6)
    but 1 ... Ke5!

    1 Bg4! (waiting)
    1 ... Ke3 2 Qe2
    1 ... Ke5 2 Qe6

    By the way, problems 6 and 7 in this forum show the Dombrovskis theme.
  5. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    26 Oct '12 07:36
    Originally posted by Linden Lyons
    Hi SG.

    Perhaps you're right, but on the other hand I think it's a clear depiction of the Dombrovskis theme: in one try threat X is defeated by x, and in another try threat Y is defeated by y, then in the post-key play, x leads to X and y leads to Y.

    I'll see if I can find a tripling or quadrupling of this theme. Anyway, here's the full solution:
    ...[text shortened]... 2
    1 ... Ke5 2 Qe6

    By the way, problems 6 and 7 in this forum show the Dombrovskis theme.
    I'm not a fan of "try" themes in general. It seems like the old idea of tries were based more on plausible ideas that didn't work on account of one only-move defense. The solver would run into those first, because they looked more obvious. Only then would the key be found, and so the tries would naturally be appreciated as adding interest to the problem.

    But now we have problems like this one. It's a simple miniature with an obvious key and symmetrical mates. I find the solution first, and never notice any of the tries. I can't be arsed to go back and look for failing moves after I've found the successful one. And I can't be arsed to make sure there is only one possible defense per try.

    Especially when the 'reward' is a tic-tac-toe grid of letters in some sort of pattern. That's the real reason they are composed. It has nothing to do with interesting play on the board. It is all about getting little grids of letters.
  6. 30 Oct '12 13:43
    Here's a quadrupling of the Dombrovskis theme. White mates black in two moves.

    Demetrios Kapralos
    Probleemblad
    3rd prize, 148th Theme Tourney

    #2
  7. 30 Oct '12 16:01
    Initially I thought this was an easy Bc3 (which works against d4, e4 and Bxc6), but not Bb5.
    It would seem to complete this, one would need to cover the one exit square available (Kd4), but Rb4, Bc3, Bb6+, Nf5, Nc2, Qh4 and Qg4 all don't work 🙁
  8. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    31 Oct '12 00:57 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Linden Lyons
    Here's a quadrupling of the Dombrovskis theme. White mates black in two moves.

    Demetrios Kapralos
    Probleemblad
    3rd prize, 148th Theme Tourney
    [fen]3N4/1R6/2Pp4/B1kpp3/b7/Pp1PNp1Q/1p3P2/1K6 w[/fen]
    #2
    1. Qf5 (zug) e4
    (1... d4 2. Bb4# )
    (1... Bb5 2. Bb6# )
    (1... Bxc6 2. Ne6# )
    (1... Kd4 2. Ne6# )
    2. Qxd5#
  9. 31 Oct '12 01:28
    Well done SG.

    1 Qd7? (threat 2 Ne6) but 1 ... Kd4!
    1 Rb4? (threat 2 Bb6) but 1 ... Bb5!
    1 Nf5? (threat 2 Bb4) but 1 ... d4!
    1 Qxf3? (threat 2 Qxd5) but 1 ... e4!

    1 Qf5! (waiting)
    1 ... Kd4/Bxc6 2 Ne6
    1 ... Bb5 2 Bb6
    1 ... d4 2 Bb4
    1 ... e4 2 Qxd5