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  1. 21 Jan '15 21:35
    Hello all, I have been attempting to improve by studying tactics and also reading through some annotated games. I have "Unbeatable Chess Lessons for Juniors" by Robert Snyder and also the Zurich International Chess Tournament book by David Bronstein. I like both books because there is more concrete instruction of the ideas behind moves as opposed to lengthy analysis and variations. However, there are still some variations that are mentioned at appropriate times. While there are diagrams throughout both books, there of course are not diagrams at every position, and when I see the possible variations for some moves without diagrams, I find it very hard to play through them and also keep track of where the pieces were beforehand while at the same time trying to understand the differences in the variations. I was wondering what methods some of you use to "stay on track" while studying a book and trying to see the goings on at the chessboard at the same time? Hope this all made sense. Thanks!
  2. Subscriber moonbus
    Uber-Nerd
    21 Jan '15 22:59
    Use two chess sets: one to follow the main line, the other to follow variations.
  3. Donation ketchuplover
    G.O.A.T.
    23 Jan '15 13:54
    Originally posted by ferntheballplayer
    Hello all, I have been attempting to improve by studying tactics and also reading through some annotated games. I have "Unbeatable Chess Lessons for Juniors" by Robert Snyder and also the Zurich International Chess Tournament book by David Bronstein. I like both books because there is more concrete instruction of the ideas behind moves as opposed t ...[text shortened]... rying to see the goings on at the chessboard at the same time? Hope this all made sense. Thanks!
    Robert Snyder? arrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrgh 🙁
  4. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    24 Jan '15 17:24 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by ketchuplover
    Robert Snyder? arrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrgh 🙁
    Yeah, Snyder is a low life scumbag.
    Take that book and burn it man. Snyder has no business teaching chess.
    He has no business being alive either for that matter.
  5. 24 Jan '15 22:52 / 3 edits
    Never used the two sets method.

    Nor have I used very often the play over game without looking
    at the notes, then play through it again system.
    (I have tried it, some players swear by this.)

    I play though the game, if I bump into a note and it has some key phrases in it.

    'Checkmate', 'trap', or a !! or a !!! move etc...etc then I dive in.

    And I mean dive in. I have spent hours on a note in the past.
    Sometimes I never even got around to finishing off the whole game.

    (no wonder I suck at engames. I've never seen one! I stop at the first trick!)

    If the note at the start of the game is telling you what was played
    in such and such in the year dot and does not come to any conclussion
    or offer any advice and is there just to pad out the piece.

    (The author is telling you he has a database and knows how to use it.)

    I ignore those. Infact if I see a useless note I usually put a big red
    cross right through it. I totally vandalise my chess books.

    Use previous diagram to reset the position and take it from there,
    or set up the bits again and play out the game till you reach the
    position you just looked at. If it's an early middle game I always did this.

    You have the Bronstein Book. Game 105. Bronstein - Gligoric

    Note after 13....Rfc8. (or 13...KR-B1 is what my one says.)

    Scan note, the words; '......can sacrifice his Queen' should pop out at you.
    These are phrases you are looking for.

    Dive in here and look, see if you agree or disagree, Really give it a good
    going over. Play out some lines, try things.....get ideas!
    You are being told it's OK to sac a Queen for two minor pieces!

    This book was co-written with Vainstein (Bronstein admits Vainstein did
    most of it) but the later note after move 34 in that game is pure Bronstein.
    That is experience talking.


    Edit:

    Snyder is a convicted beast. You probably did not know this.
    I'm not into burning books - defacing them yes, burning them no.

    Apparently his books are OK (I've no idea, I don't have one).
    Before his conviction one often saw them mentioned as being good.

    It's up to you.