Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Only Chess Forum

Only Chess Forum

  1. 26 Jul '08 04:11
    What's the quickest and best way to get up to speed on, or at least somewhat familiar with, a new opening? I am particularly interested in online resources. Also a good book rec wouldn't hurt, but please, not one of those monsters, MCO and the other one. Something smaller, simpler, cheaper, and more instructive, though less detailed (obviously). A hybrid between Seirawan's opening book and MCO, perhaps. Thanks.
  2. 26 Jul '08 04:38
    Originally posted by basso
    What's the quickest and best way to get up to speed on, or at least somewhat familiar with, a new opening? I am particularly interested in online resources. Also a good book rec wouldn't hurt, but please, not one of those monsters, MCO and the other one. Something smaller, simpler, cheaper, and more instructive, though less detailed (obviously). A hybrid between Seirawan's opening book and MCO, perhaps. Thanks.
    Find out which strong players utilise the opening of your choice.Get annotated games of them with this opening.Study these games well.
    You will learn all the variations,tricks and traps,the most common tactical motifs,piece placement and how to handle the endgames that arise.

    Write down all your findings and publish an opening book yourself.Get some dollars for your efforts
  3. Standard member irontigran
    Rob Scheider is..
    26 Jul '08 04:49
    Originally posted by Katastroof
    Find out which strong players utilise the opening of your choice.Get annotated games of them with this opening.Study these games well.
    You will learn all the variations,tricks and traps,the most common tactical motifs,piece placement and how to handle the endgames that arise.

    Write down all your findings and publish an opening book yourself.Get some dollars for your efforts
    if its a top level player, who mostly plays other super skilled players im not sure youll see all the traps that show up.. how so?
  4. 26 Jul '08 04:59 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by irontigran
    if its a top level player, who mostly plays other super skilled players im not sure youll see all the traps that show up.. how so?
    That's where the annotations come into play.If well annotated a trap should be pointed out.And if you really study the games you can find the traps yourself.With study I don't mean just replaying the game.
    Also,when I say 'strong player' I don't necessarily mean a super GM.It may be a lesser god,one who plays other mere mortals,which once in a while fall into traps.
  5. 26 Jul '08 05:01
    Katastroof gives what strikes me as a good answer for "the best way" to learn an opening, but this method can't be "the quickest way." What if you only have an hour or two to devote to this enterprise? Isn't there a website that will give you the basics of an opening? Or a book that will give you maybe 2 or 3 times the info on an opening as Seirawan's book does, and will also include more openings? I think Seirawan fails to even include the Vienna game. Maybe 10 pages or so per opening sounds about right. Simple, basic, the next level up from Seirawan. Websites? Thanks.
  6. 26 Jul '08 05:27 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by basso
    Katastroof gives what strikes me as a good answer for "the best way" to learn an opening, but this method can't be "the quickest way." What if you only have an hour or two to devote to this enterprise? Isn't there a website that will give you the basics of an opening? Or a book that will give you maybe 2 or 3 times the info on an opening as Seirawan's book ...[text shortened]... sounds about right. Simple, basic, the next level up from Seirawan. Websites? Thanks.
    Ah,you got me with the quick part LOL
    I don't know any such websites.Have you tried googling an opening?

    As for books.I'm not familiar with Seirawan's book so don't know exactly what you're looking for.Though this might be it:

    http://www.newinchess.com/Shop/ProductDetails.aspx?ProductID=380

    It only covers 1.e4,think they have yet to write volume 2.
  7. 26 Jul '08 17:07
    Originally posted by basso
    What's the quickest and best way to get up to speed on, or at least somewhat familiar with, a new opening? I am particularly interested in online resources. Also a good book rec wouldn't hurt, but please, not one of those monsters, MCO and the other one. Something smaller, simpler, cheaper, and more instructive, though less detailed (obviously). A hybrid between Seirawan's opening book and MCO, perhaps. Thanks.
    Memorize the basics of the opening from an opening database, then go play as many blitz chess games as you can with that opening. This would give you an idea of how your opponents will try to handle it. Also this makes memorization much easier.
  8. 26 Jul '08 23:22 / 2 edits
    KnightStalker's idea definitely sounds like a good, quick, and relatively easy method to familiarize oneself with an opening. One more question: In my efforts to date at learning particular openings, I am usually at a loss as to the ideas behind the various opening moves. How to come to an understanding of these ideas? Unfortunately, Reubin Fine's "Ideas Behind the Chess Openings" has been no help. Thanks.
  9. Standard member Nowakowski
    10. O-O
    26 Jul '08 23:38
    Chess Software called "Book Up" will help you combined with playing a large load of Blitz games.
  10. 27 Jul '08 01:53
    http://www.eudesign.com/chessops/
  11. 27 Jul '08 04:01
    Originally posted by MissOleum
    http://www.eudesign.com/chessops/
    Nice site rec -- I like it. The book. "Chess Opening Essentials," at NewInChess, also looks good. But so does John Watson's "Mastering the Chess Openings." And Watson's book gets great reviews at Amazon. I'm leaning towards Watson's book. Comments, anyone?