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  1. Subscriber 64squaresofpain On Vacation
    The drunk knight
    09 Apr '17 12:44
    Greetings players and fellow patzers 🙂

    Recently finished another game with user @Shaun12 which once again contained valuable lessons,
    the main one being the difficult task of pawn move calculations.

    The first critical moment was reached here, Black to move:

    Black played 26...d6-d5


    Naturally White can play Bxe5 and would be able to hold onto the pawn after BxN,
    however Black can sac a piece to get a far advanced pawn.

    The length of calculation required to work this out,
    to determine whether the sac was sound and ultimately who is winning
    is unfortunately beyond my current level 🙁

    It turns out my opponent had also miscalculated!

    Here's the full game with notes



    I did see one neat little mate, see next post 🙂
  2. Subscriber 64squaresofpain On Vacation
    The drunk knight
    09 Apr '17 12:46
    Here's the mate, of course only after Ka1 is played



    I was lucky to even win this one though... how many of you could have calculated a Black win after move 26?
  3. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    09 Apr '17 13:19
    Originally posted by 64squaresofpain
    Greetings players and fellow patzers 🙂

    Recently finished another game with user @Shaun12 which once again contained valuable lessons,
    the main one being the difficult task of pawn move calculations.

    The first critical moment was reached here, Black to move:
    [fen]8/4bppp/p1kp1n2/1p2p3/1P2P3/2BP3P/P1N2PP1/6K1[/fen]
    Black played 26...d6-d5
    [f ...[text shortened]... gxh5 gxh5 41. f4 {Black resigned} 1-0[/pgn]

    I did see one neat little mate, see next post 🙂
    Interesting game and notes. Thanks for posting.
  4. 09 Apr '17 14:18
    .26. ...d5 wasn't so good. It wss ca. equal position and Black should keep manouvering and it should end draw.
    White could defend with 27. f3 but 27 Bxe5 is better and you should have continued 28. dxe4 and if he takes Nxe4 you take Bxg7 and have good edge.
  5. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    09 Apr '17 15:14
    Originally posted by 64squaresofpain
    Greetings players and fellow patzers 🙂

    Recently finished another game with user @Shaun12 which once again contained valuable lessons,
    the main one being the difficult task of pawn move calculations.

    The first critical moment was reached here, Black to move:
    [fen]8/4bppp/p1kp1n2/1p2p3/1P2P3/2BP3P/P1N2PP1/6K1[/fen]
    Black played 26...d6-d5
    [f ...[text shortened]... gxh5 gxh5 41. f4 {Black resigned} 1-0[/pgn]

    I did see one neat little mate, see next post 🙂
    I played it out from move 26 against an engine. The interesting move is 31. Bc1. The bishop belongs on d2 because from there it covers c3 and the pawn on b4, this leaves the pawn on a2 where it covers b3. So 31. Kf1 and 31. Bd2 are equally good. The net result is that black can't get his king in and the zugzwang problems don't exist.
  6. Subscriber moonbus
    Uber-Nerd
    11 Apr '17 05:48 / 2 edits
    Yes, I agree. Once the B covers c1, I would have played 31. Kf1 and 32. Bd2. If 32. ... c1(Q) then of course 33. BxQ, Kxb4, and White has a clear plan for the rest of the game. White a-pawn and bishop hold off the Black a- and b-pawns, sac the bishop if necessary, while the White K mops up the other side of the board.
  7. Subscriber 64squaresofpain On Vacation
    The drunk knight
    14 Apr '17 23:30
    Yes 🙂 This was the hard part, from move 26 I think me and my opponent had looked at Bc1,
    I honestly didn't even consider Bd2 which would have been more accurate.

    Stages of learning, it's all milestones.
    I've hit my new ceiling of 1900(ish)
    The day I am able to master these kind of longer calculations will be the day that I will break 2000 😀

    Perhaps many years from now when I'm retired and have more time!
  8. Subscriber moonbus
    Uber-Nerd
    17 Apr '17 10:29 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by 64squaresofpain
    Yes 🙂 This was the hard part, from move 26 I think me and my opponent had looked at Bc1,
    I honestly didn't even consider Bd2 which would have been more accurate.

    Stages of learning, it's all milestones.
    I've hit my new ceiling of 1900(ish)
    The day I am able to master these kind of longer calculations will be the day that I will break 2000 😀

    [hidden]Perhaps many years from now when I'm retired and have more time![/hidden]
    Yeah, you and me both. 2000 seems to be the next big hurdle. I got me a couple of books which came highly recommended: "Chess Strategy in Action" by John Watson is next on my must-read-before-I-can't-remember-how-the-pieces-move-anymore list. One thing I'm sure of: calculating longer and longer variations isn't what's going to get us over that next hump; it's positional judgment we have to refine. Yes, I know, some players, even quite strong ones, say there is no such thing as positional chess. They're wrong. I find, in my 'advanced middle age' that I calculate variations much less than in my youth, and I play much better chess now than I did 40 years ago; I can see this when I play over games I wrote down played as a youth.

    I'm 62, due to retire in a few ... and I just know there isn't going to be any more time then than there is now for such silly obsessions as chess.
  9. Subscriber 64squaresofpain On Vacation
    The drunk knight
    18 Apr '17 14:07
    Old git 🙂

    I know exactly what I need in order to improve my game: More OTB experience.

    I plan to one day join a chess club somewhere local to me,
    where I get to play competitive matches on a regular basis.

    The only thing holding me back of late is my work schedule... unless I can find a good club that plays only on Sundays?
    Up to now, I've been led to believe that club nights around here are all midweek, which I just can't commit to 🙁