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  1. 09 Feb '08 13:14
    Being new to on-line chess, I'm kind of curious as to how a rating is achieved. I've noticed that on winning or losing a game there seem to be no set number of points that go up or drop. Is there a standard formula that is used? Also, are these ratings used across the board (no pun intended) in chess competitions or are they unique to RHP?
  2. 09 Feb '08 14:12
    Ok, so I just found how ratings are calculated in the FAQ's section. If anyone can please translate, it'll be greatly appreciated.
  3. 09 Feb '08 14:35
    Originally posted by Ray Gunz I
    Ok, so I just found how ratings are calculated in the FAQ's section. If anyone can please translate, it'll be greatly appreciated.
    I think this site uses Elo's formula.
  4. 09 Feb '08 17:34
    Originally posted by tomtom232
    I think this site uses Elo's formula.
    I just googled Elo's Formula. Maybe I can get a better idea from there. Truth be known, mathematical formulas, equations, math in general and myself well, let's just say we ain't exactly friends. It's evil stuff I tell you! Think I'll just accept the rating for whatever it is, some things are just better off left alone. Thanks tomtom232
  5. 09 Feb '08 20:26 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by Ray Gunz I
    I just googled Elo's Formula. Maybe I can get a better idea from there. Truth be known, mathematical formulas, equations, math in general and myself well, let's just say we ain't exactly friends. It's evil stuff I tell you! Think I'll just accept the rating for whatever it is, some things are just better off left alone. Thanks tomtom232
    just some small points:

    -when you are provisional, the rating deviates a lot. as you play more and more games, it begins to be more stable, and you win/lose only a reasonable amount of points per game.

    -the higher the player's rating you beat, the more points you get. the lower the player's rating you lose against, the more points you'll lose.

    -a beginner is considered around 1200 level. 1600 is the serious amateur, 1800 could be called a strong player. 2200+ is master, then comes IM(2400) and GM(2600). (roughly. it's a little more complicated than that.)
  6. 13 Feb '08 11:46
    Thanks, now that's a explanation I can understand!
  7. 13 Feb '08 21:45
    Originally posted by diskamyl
    just some small points:

    -when you are provisional, the rating deviates a lot. as you play more and more games, it begins to be more stable, and you win/lose only a reasonable amount of points per game.

    -the higher the player's rating you beat, the more points you get. the lower the player's rating you lose against, the more points you'll lose.

    - ...[text shortened]... ster, then comes IM(2400) and GM(2600). (roughly. it's a little more complicated than that.)
    It's worth noting that a 1200 player (in most Elo ratings systems) would be a strong beginner; obviously, a lot of people are far under that and are also beginners.
  8. Standard member clandarkfire
    Grammar Nazi
    14 Feb '08 00:02
    I believe once you are out of the provisional system it works like this:

    If you win against someone within 25 points of you, you get 16 points.

    for every 25 points they a rated more than you, you get an extra point. for every 25 points they are rated less than you, you get one poin less than 16. The same goes for losing, only you lose points. In this way, if a 2200player wins to a 1200 player, he gets no points at all, and the 1200 would not lose any points either.
  9. 14 Feb '08 04:15
    You don't need the math if you have a ready reckoner - it's in Thread 80000 (thanks to Drew L). It applies to most of the people on this site until they reach high rating levels.
  10. 14 Feb '08 04:39 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by MissOleum
    You don't need the math if you have a ready reckoner - it's in Thread 80000 (thanks to Drew L). It applies to most of the people on this site until they reach high rating levels.
    Thread 80000, that is easy to remember.

    Also, for those of you who have firefox, you can install the addon Greasemonkey and then download a script to tell you the rating difference here:

    http://members.shaw.ca/ouroboros/RHP/

    Make sure you download the stable release as well. It is phenomenal!