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  1. 01 Sep '17 21:02
    I am worried because I get very happy when I open a game and see that my opponent blundered.

    I am happy not because what I did was good, but another person played something bad.
  2. 02 Sep '17 01:12
    You only go around once in this Chess world, so take what ever you can.

    At all chess levels, people make mistakes. Do you want an opponent who never makes a mistake? That's called a computer.
  3. 02 Sep '17 01:42
    Originally posted by @montymoose
    You only go around once in this Chess world, so take what ever you can.

    At all chess levels, people make mistakes. Do you want an opponent who never makes a mistake? That's called a computer.
    No, I want opponents that make lots of mistakes! I like to win. I just think that is probably a character flaw.
  4. 02 Sep '17 03:10
    Then we are on the same page, mi amigo. One of the sweet moments in Chess is when you force two options onto your opponent and neither of them is good. Also leaving poisioned bait laying around and waiting for the big bass to come up and investigate. Punish the blunders. That is part of the game.
  5. 02 Sep '17 04:58
    Originally posted by @eladar
    I am worried because I get very happy when I open a game and see that my opponent blundered.

    I am happy not because what I did was good, but another person played something bad.
    Maybe you simply need to enjoy the game more, and worry a little less.
  6. Subscriber moonbus
    Uber-Nerd
    02 Sep '17 21:13
    Originally posted by @eladar
    I am worried because I get very happy when I open a game and see that my opponent blundered.

    I am happy not because what I did was good, but another person played something bad.
    There is a word for this in German: "Schadensfreude," pleasure at another's misfortune.

    Just don't forget that you too will blunder.
  7. 02 Sep '17 22:15
    Originally posted by @moonbus
    There is a word for this in German: "Schadensfreude," pleasure at another's misfortune.

    Just don't forget that you too will blunder.
    I blunder quite often.
  8. Subscriber moonbus
    Uber-Nerd
    03 Sep '17 16:47
    Originally posted by @eladar
    I blunder quite often.
    The trick is to do it against stronger and stronger players.
  9. 03 Sep '17 17:29
    Originally posted by @moonbus
    The trick is to do it against stronger and stronger players.
    In other words, to refine your blunders so fewer and fewer people will recognize them as blunders.
  10. Subscriber moonbus
    Uber-Nerd
    03 Sep '17 20:28
    Yup.
  11. 03 Sep '17 21:08
    Originally posted by @moonbus
    Yup.
    I have far to go.
  12. 04 Sep '17 01:15
    Originally posted by @eladar
    ...I have far to go...
    So what else better you got to do with your time, Bucky? Well, except for all that 'real life' silliness. 😛
  13. Subscriber moonbus
    Uber-Nerd
    04 Sep '17 09:25
    Originally posted by @eladar
    I have far to go.
    It's better than the alternatives.
  14. Subscriber BigDoggProblemonline
    The Advanced Mind
    08 Sep '17 17:59
    Originally posted by @eladar
    I am worried because I get very happy when I open a game and see that my opponent blundered.

    I am happy not because what I did was good, but another person played something bad.
    He who laughs at calamity shall not go unpunished.

    -God
  15. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    09 Sep '17 19:12 / 2 edits
    I am reading GM Jonathan Rowson's book Chess For Zebras, and in one place he quotes another GM who says something to the effect of

    "You know you are getting better when everyone else seems to be playing worse".

    and this thread seems to be in that neighborhood.

    As an aside, Rowson's books are awesome. He has changes how I approach OTB play for the better, as I have raised my OTB rating by 120 ELO in 6 months, and placed 1st or tied for 1st in two weekend Tournaments in my section (Orlando Chess Stars Open U2000 and the Southern Open U2100 <I won the U1900 prize $ in the section> in Florida USA) for just over $1100 in prize money.

    I feel like I owe him a commission, if for no other reason than that my wife has stopped giving me grief about the $$ I spend on chess books.... 🙄