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  1. 19 Feb '14 00:23 / 1 edit
    A good blog this one.

    Me playing a girl at chess at a fancy dress chess tournament.

    Proof Ian Fleming knew about chess - and a mini review of Moonraker.

    The Bond villian Drax getting trapped.

    A new example of the Reti Study theme missed by an RHP lad.

    A 'how did that happen puzzle'
    (S.G. what is the correct technical term and please post the solution here with a pgn thingy.)

    Play the 4 opening moves that reached this position after Black’s 4th move.


  2. 19 Feb '14 10:17 / 2 edits
    Just to interrupt.
    A long way back you did a post on Blackburne doing a f5 in response to Evans Gambit.
    Anyways I tried it out f5 after 4. c3 and played one of my best games of chess.

    Game 10454369

    P.S another interesting post, I will try the square when I can

    G
  3. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    19 Feb '14 10:50
    The final game is just brilliant!
  4. Subscriber Ponderable
    chemist
    19 Feb '14 12:02 / 1 edit
    I can do it in three:

    1. e4 e6 2. Bc4 c6 3. Bxe6 dxe6


    but not in four. I do need three pawn moves for black, and I can't any filling move with the knight (to and fro)...
  5. 19 Feb '14 12:15
    Originally posted by Ponderable
    I can do it in three:

    [hidden]1. e4 e6 2. Bc4 c6 3. Bxe6 dxe6 [/hidden]

    but not in four. I do need three pawn moves for black, and I can't any filling move with the knight (to and fro)...
    That's indeed the funny thing. To squeeze in one more move for each side is really hard. I managed to find it however:

  6. 19 Feb '14 13:58
    You have solved it TVchess.

    I was hoping the do it in 3 would throw you.
    I was ready with a "I said 4 moves not 3." It's good one.

    That is an entertaing game the7tidlys.
    The last thing I expected was it to go all the way to an ending with
    both sides promoting, The game was on edge all the way through.
  7. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    19 Feb '14 14:24
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    A 'how did that happen puzzle'
    (S.G. what is the correct technical term ...
    It's a Proof Game in 4.0 moves.
  8. 19 Feb '14 15:28
    Cheers mate.

    Russ wanted you to do the Reti Study but I voluntered to do it.
    One you owe me.
  9. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    19 Feb '14 17:04
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Cheers mate.

    Russ wanted you to do the Reti Study but I voluntered to do it.
    One you owe me.
    Heh, I'm so hopeless Russ doesn't even message me about writing a blog.

    Just put it on my tab.
  10. 20 Feb '14 09:40 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    You have solved it TVchess.

    I was hoping the do it in 3 would throw you.
    I was ready with a "I said 4 moves not 3." It's good one.

    That is an entertaing game the7tidlys.
    The last thing I expected was it to go all the way to an ending with
    both sides promoting, The game was on edge all the way through.
    I am sure there were places in there that a quality player (better than me and the opp), would have found a way.

    I just wish I knew someone who likes to anlayse slightly unusual chess positions...

    Anyway thanks for the response, it is a pleasure to read your (and Russ, who the hell is he?) blog.

    G
  11. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    22 Feb '14 01:49
    One big "stand up and applaud" for me was that the blog shows how studies such as Reti's have tremendous learning value, as the concept/idea can be applied to our own games.

    The idea that, in chess, the shortest distance between two points for a king is not always a straight line is not an intuitive one, and worth remembering.
  12. 22 Feb '14 05:20
    Hi the7tidlys

    Russ is the lad who owns and runs this site. The Boss.

    (though don't Robbie McRobbie, he thinks he owns the place.)
  13. Subscriber moonbus
    Uber-Nerd
    22 Feb '14 14:05
    Originally posted by Paul Leggett
    One big "stand up and applaud" for me was that the blog shows how studies such as Reti's have tremendous learning value, as the concept/idea can be applied to our own games.

    The idea that, in chess, the shortest distance between two points for a king is not always a straight line is not an intuitive one, and worth remembering.
    Em. Lasker said that he learned from Reti's endgame studies. High praise indeed.
  14. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    22 Feb '14 21:16
    That Reti study for those that like YouTube
    YouTube