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  1. 29 Aug '14 13:51 / 1 edit
    Ever seen a player make 9 consecutive captures and resign next move?
    Well you will now.

    Janowski setting a trap Tarrasch avoids but RHP players gladly jump into.

    RHP players getting themselves checkmatd by walking into pawn mates.

    A wee puzzle with No.9 clues plastered all over the blog.

    and here...


    The Rook on the 7th losses to a Rook on the 8th.

    Blog 4

    I was going to delay this blog for a few days because Natalia Pogonina posted a
    few days ago. But I've been roped into helping daighter shift house at the weekend.
  2. 29 Aug '14 14:29
    A good clue to the "White to play and mate in one move" is to point out that the composer was Sam Loyd. That alone might be enough for some people.
  3. 30 Aug '14 02:19

    White (playing up the board) to play and mate in one move.

    I gave enough No.9 clues. There are 9 Black pawns.
    To make the position legal remove one black pawn.
    It matters not which one you take off - it's always mate in one.
  4. 30 Aug '14 04:20
    Stunning!
  5. 04 Sep '14 02:27
    Made me smile.

    Well, grimace maybe.
  6. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    04 Sep '14 11:56
    Originally posted by Data Fly
    A good clue to the "White to play and mate in one move" is to point out that the composer was Sam Loyd. That alone might be enough for some people.
    Actually, it's H. Fischer, 1910.
  7. 04 Sep '14 13:19
    Loyd did do a nine pawn mate in one with the same trick.
    Remove any pawn and it's mate in one.

    I'll see if I can find it but getting ready to go out. Maybe post later tonight.
  8. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    04 Sep '14 16:19
    Originally posted by BigDoggProblem
    Actually, it's H. Fischer, 1910.
    Bobby's grampa?
  9. 04 Sep '14 16:41
    Originally posted by BigDoggProblem
    Actually, it's H. Fischer, 1910.
    There seems to be some debate about that. e.g. see:
    http://www.milanvel.net/mp/snapshot/rescbody.php?px=1273423398&fid=gen&tid=634

    At the very least it seems that the problem was composed before 1910.
  10. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    04 Sep '14 17:03
    Originally posted by Data Fly
    There seems to be some debate about that. e.g. see:
    http://www.milanvel.net/mp/snapshot/rescbody.php?px=1273423398&fid=gen&tid=634

    At the very least it seems that the problem was composed before 1910.
    The source arguing for Loyd is 1984. I would think it more likely that the 1984 guy didn't do his historical research carefully than the 1910 guy got it wrong when the problem was composed closer in time to 1910.

    It seems that 1910 is the date of the book rather than the problem, so yeah, it's probably earlier.

    I'm trying to do a search on the problem database site, but it's spazzing. I'll post again if it reveals any new info.