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  1. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    30 May '14 21:14 / 1 edit
    I was just having a look at chessgames games of the day. Have a quick peak at this...

    Franklin Knowles Young v L Dore


    Not too shabby. "Who is this Franklin Knowles Young fella then?" i think to myself. So i click through to his profile page and get this description...

    Franklin Knowles Young was born in Boston and died in Winthrop, Massachusetts. He was an American author who tried to apply battlefield principles to the chessboard in a number of books. They were full of incomprehensibilities such as, "The normal formative processes of a Logistic Grand Battle consist, first, in Echeloning by RP to QR4 and then in Aligning the Left Major Front Refused en Potence by the development of QKtP to QKt5, followed by Doubly Aligning the Left Major Front Refused and Aligned by developing QRP to QR5." His books have been the subject of ridicule from the time they were published until the present day.

    Obviously the guy had no redeeming features! JEEEEEZ...
  2. 30 May '14 21:57
    Well, he know a thing or two about something.
  3. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    31 May '14 00:57
    Originally posted by Marinkatomb
    I was just having a look at chessgames games of the day. Have a quick peak at this...

    Franklin Knowles Young v L Dore
    [pgn][Event "Boston"]
    [Site "Boston"]
    [Date "1892.??.??"]
    [EventDate "?"]
    [Round "?"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [White "Franklin Knowles Young"]
    [Black "L Dore"]
    [ECO "C21"]
    [WhiteElo "?"]
    [BlackElo "?"]
    [PlyCount "43"]

    1. e4 e5 2. ...[text shortened]... lished until the present day.
    [/i]

    Obviously the guy had no redeeming features! JEEEEEZ...[/b]
    I read The "Grand Tactics of Chess" when I was a young man. It was a difficult read to say the least. But I believe I learned from it.
  4. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    31 May '14 09:53 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by ChessPraxis
    I read The "Grand Tactics of Chess" when I was a young man. It was a difficult read to say the least. But I believe I learned from it.
    http://books.google.co.uk/books/about/The_grand_tactics_of_chess.html?id=ZXUCAAAAYAAJ

    "The Grand Tactics of Chess: An Exposition of the Laws and Principles of Chess Strategetics, the Practical Application of These Laws and Principles to the Movement of Forces: Mobilization, Development, Manoeuvre, and Operation"

    Hahahahahahahahahahahaha!!! I MUST find a copy of this!!

    EDIT: Here's an Edward winter article on him...

    http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/extra/young.html

    EDIT II: Wow, i've found one of his books as an ebook. Check out the description..

    "Written in 1898, the stated purpose of this book is to elucidate those processes upon which every ruse, trick, artifice, and strategem known in chessplay, is founded; consequently, this treatise is devoted to teaching the student how to win hostile pieces, to queen his pawns, and to checkmate the adverse king. All the processes are determinate, and if the opponent becomes involved in any one of them, he should lose the game."

    Who talks like that? I mean seriously...

    http://www.e-booksdirectory.com/details.php?ebook=6938
  5. 31 May '14 09:58
    Franklin Knowles Young wrote several books around the turn of the century, which can be read for free at https://archive.org/
    I've just had a quick look and can't say I've seen any other instructional chess books quite like them...
  6. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    31 May '14 10:19
    Originally posted by Tommovich
    Franklin Knowles Young wrote several books around the turn of the century, which can be read for free at https://archive.org/
    I've just had a quick look and can't say I've seen any other instructional chess books quite like them...
    You can say that again! Check out this quote..



    Quote: "Note, the pawn, having the move, advances along its front offensive to that point were it's logistic symbol and it's geometric symbol intersect"

    Yes, that's definitely the most economical way to explain what a pawn fork is, LOL!
  7. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    31 May '14 11:36
    Proof positive, if any were required, that playing chess and teaching chess are different skills.
  8. 31 May '14 11:43
    http://cdn.doyouremember.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/Ed-Wood-courtesy-filmonpaper.com_.jpg
  9. 31 May '14 13:35
    Originally posted by Marinkatomb
    You can say that again! Check out this quote..

    Quote: "Note, the pawn, having the move, advances along its front offensive to that point were it's logistic symbol and it's geometric symbol intersect"

    Yes, that's definitely the most economical way to explain what a pawn fork is, LOL!
    Indeed! How about this from The Major Tactics of Chess:

    "Pawn and Knight versus Knight"



    "Whenever a point of junction is the vertex of a mathematical figure formed by the union of the logistic symbol of a pawn with an oblique, diagonal, horizontal or vertical from the logistic symbol of any kindred piece; then the given combination of two kindred pieces wins any given adverse piece."

    Phew! And it's like this all the way through the book...

    Still, this book is a gem, and if I'm lucky enough to find a copy in my local second-hand bookshop I shall be a happy man.
  10. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    31 May '14 14:04
    Originally posted by Tommovich
    Indeed! How about this from The Major Tactics of Chess:

    "Pawn and Knight versus Knight"

    [fen]8/3P1n2/2N5/8/8/8/8/8[/fen]

    "Whenever a point of junction is the vertex of a mathematical figure formed by the union of the logistic symbol of a pawn with an oblique, diagonal, horizontal or vertical from the logistic symbol of any kindred piece; then the ...[text shortened]... and if I'm lucky enough to find a copy in my local second-hand bookshop I shall be a happy man.
    LOL, amazing! There is a copy on amazon.com...
  11. 31 May '14 14:57
    Originally posted by Marinkatomb
    LOL, amazing! There is a copy on amazon.com...
    Thanks!
    The version on https://archive.org/ is free to read, but I struggle to read books on a computer screen (not that I'm sure this book is actually readable...)
  12. Subscriber thaughbaer
    Duckfinder General
    31 May '14 15:39
    Can you imagine him in the forum here. I wonder if there is internet access on the other side.
  13. 31 May '14 17:15
    Originally posted by thaughbaer
    Can you imagine him in the forum here. I wonder if there is internet access on the other side.
    I can...---> ......
    http://cl.jroo.me/z3/w/o/v/d/a.aaa-computer-grave.jpg
  14. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    31 May '14 22:01
    Originally posted by Marinkatomb
    http://books.google.co.uk/books/about/The_grand_tactics_of_chess.html?id=ZXUCAAAAYAAJ

    "The Grand Tactics of Chess: An Exposition of the Laws and Principles of Chess Strategetics, the Practical Application of These Laws and Principles to the Movement of Forces: Mobilization, Development, Manoeuvre, and Operation"

    Hahahahahahahahahahahaha!!! I ...[text shortened]... n any one of them, he should lose the game."[/i]

    Who talks like that? I mean seriously...

    Grampy Bobby
  15. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    31 May '14 22:06 / 1 edit
    One needs one hell of a vocab,geometry, trig, and military science.
    Now if a feller has all that going on, who has time for chess?
    I learned a great deal from the little bits and pieces that penetrated my cranium. After studying F. Knowles, Nimzowitsch was a breeze.