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  1. 05 Jul '10 03:11
    King & Queen = Royalty.
    Two bishops = Clergy
    Two knights = Chivalry
    Two rooks = ???

    Rookery?
    Realty?
  2. Standard member Thabtos
    I am become Death
    05 Jul '10 03:14
    Artillery. They're cannons in them castles, or dung in them elephants, whichever your favorite flavor.
  3. 05 Jul '10 03:35
    This is what Wikipedia is for... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rook_(chess)

    The History section is actually a pretty interesting read! Apparently in the Persian version of the game, "rooks" represented chariots, which were made to look like small mobile buildings to inspire terror. I never knew that.

    Aaaand now I'm reading a Wikipedia article on the Battle of Plataea, so it goes...
  4. 05 Jul '10 09:47
    Originally posted by DivGradCurl
    Aaaand now I'm reading a Wikipedia article on the Battle of Plataea, so it goes...
    It is called a 'Wiki-Walk' and can last for several days.

    In Australia, they call it 'Walkabout'

    A rook (♖ ♜ borrowed from Persian رخ rokh, Sanskrit रथ rath, "chariot" is a piece in the strategy board game of chess. The piece has been called the castle, tower, marquess, rector, and comes (Sunnucks 1970). The old-fashioned term "castle" is still used by some non-players
  5. 05 Jul '10 12:34
    King & Queen = Royalty.
    Two bishops = Clergy
    Two knights = Chivalry

    Two rooks = ???

    ----------------------------------------

    8 Pawns = Peasantry.


    The 4 Rooks are placed on the corner of the board to weigh it down
    so it does not fly way.

    Try it.Set up the board for a game. Remove the 4 Rooks and the board
    starts to float about the place.

    That is why inlaid boards where invented to stop the board from floating about
    when the Rooks were exchanged.

    DISCLAIMER:

    If any of you try the no Rooks experiment and your set drifts out the window
    and is lost forever. Then you cannot sue me.

    Cannot think of a term for Rooks (but I will).

    I name my Rooks 'Pinky & Perky' if Pinkie can clearly see Perky after
    10 moves then I know I'm doing OK in the opening.

    See...You don't need opening books ...aim to get Pinkie shaking hands
    with Perky on the d & e files. You will be OK.

    I also have names for all my pawns, but that is for another thread on another day.

    GM Jonathan Rowson calls his d-pawn 'Delroy' and often mentions him in print.
    Check out 7 Dealdy Sins and his brilliant book Chess for Zebras.

    All chess players are stark raving mad.

    Going out will be back with a term for the Rooks...hopefully.
  6. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    06 Jul '10 01:20
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    King & Queen = Royalty.
    Two bishops = Clergy
    Two knights = Chivalry

    Two rooks = ???

    ----------------------------------------

    8 Pawns = Peasantry.


    The 4 Rooks are placed on the corner of the board to weigh it down
    so it does not fly way.

    Try it.Set up the board for a game. Remove the 4 Rooks and the board
    starts to float about th ...[text shortened]... ers are stark raving mad.

    Going out will be back with a term for the Rooks...hopefully.
    My, that's a perky set of rooks you have there.

    In loving memory of Heinzkat
  7. 06 Jul '10 10:29
    OOPS.

    Forgot about this.

    Rooks rymes with books. In books you find pages... therefore.....

    King & Queen = Royalty.
    Two bishops = Clergy
    Two knights = Chivalry

    Two rooks = Pageantry

    8 Pawns = Peasantry.
  8. 06 Jul '10 21:23
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    OOPS.

    Forgot about this.

    Rooks rymes with books. In books you find pages... therefore.....

    King & Queen = Royalty.
    Two bishops = Clergy
    Two knights = Chivalry

    [b]Two rooks = Pageantry


    8 Pawns = Peasantry.[/b]
    I like "realty" since the rooks are real estate. But, sticking with the martial nature of the rook, how about "battlement", e.g. "I doubled my battlement on the A-file?"

    I looked up the collective noun for "rook," the bird. It is a "building of rooks" according to wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_collective_nouns_for_birds

    This is a great opportunity for someone to make a lasting contribution to the immortal game.
  9. 06 Jul '10 21:53
    Originally posted by ParShooter
    King & Queen = Royalty.
    Two bishops = Clergy
    Two knights = Chivalry
    Two rooks = ???

    Rookery?
    Realty?
    Two knights = light infantry
    Two rooks = heavy infantry
  10. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    West Coast Represent
    06 Jul '10 22:19
    I think Rooks are supposed to look like siege towers.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siege_tower
  11. Standard member Rank Materialist
    Carpe! Carpe! Carpe!
    06 Jul '10 22:29
    Originally posted by ParShooter
    King & Queen = Royalty.
    Two bishops = Clergy
    Two knights = Chivalry
    Two rooks = ???

    Rookery?
    Realty?
    Why all this effort to make each item end with the letter Y?

    It's my understanding that chess came to Europe via the Islamic Empire during the Crusades. Europeans adapted the pieces to match up with their feudal system. Hence, working from the top of the feudal pyramid down, we have:

    King/Queen = King/Queen
    Rooks = Noblemen (Like the king, they often had castles, and most Rooks look like a castle keep.)
    Bishops = Clergy
    Knights = Knights (Some served the king but most served a local noble.)
    Pawns = Serfs
  12. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    West Coast Represent
    06 Jul '10 23:39
    Originally posted by Rank Materialist
    Why all this effort to make each item end with the letter Y?

    It's my understanding that chess came to Europe via the Islamic Empire during the Crusades. Europeans adapted the pieces to match up with their feudal system. Hence, working from the top of the feudal pyramid down, we have:

    King/Queen = King/Queen
    Rooks = Noblemen (Like the king, ...[text shortened]... Clergy
    Knights = Knights (Some served the king but most served a local noble.)
    Pawns = Serfs
    HISTORY FAIL

    Rook = Chariot
    Bishop = Elephant
    Knight = Cavalry
    Queen = Prime Minister
    King = King
    Pawn = Infantry
  13. 06 Jul '10 23:40
    Originally posted by Rank Materialist
    Why all this effort to make each item end with the letter Y?

    It's poetic.

    It's my understanding that chess came to Europe via the Islamic Empire during the Crusades. Europeans adapted the pieces to match up with their feudal system. Hence, working from the top of the feudal pyramid down, we have:

    King/Queen = King/Queen
    Rooks = No ...[text shortened]... Clergy
    Knights = Knights (Some served the king but most served a local noble.)
    Pawns = Serfs
  14. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    West Coast Represent
    06 Jul '10 23:40
    Originally posted by JS357
    Two knights = light infantry
    Two rooks = heavy infantry
    Cavalry. But yes. Knights are agile cavalry, Rooks are cavalry that charge head on.
  15. 07 Jul '10 06:04
    "Why all this effort to make each item end with the letter Y? "

    ParShooter started it that's Y.

    Stop being such a spoilsport and please refrain from calling chess
    pieces an 'item'. They have feelings too you know.

    Rooks are the only pieces that you can balance one on top of one and other.
    In a bored moment I have had eight rooks towered up.
    (you need two chess sets to do this. Using pawns as promoted Rooks
    simply does not work.)

    Rooks are the real masters of the chessboard, they will never let you down.

    Place a Rook anywhere on an open board.



    And no matter where they are they will always cover 14 squares.
    You cannot say that about any other chess piece.
    All lose some of the power when cornered. (especially the Knight).