Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Only Chess Forum

Only Chess Forum

  1. Standard member DMD
    30 Dec '07 17:32
    Book recommendation: "Russians versus Fischer" by Dmitry Plisetsky
    and Sergey Voronkov(Everyman Chess-Hardback). I own a copy(different publisher), an excellent book. Secret Soviet documents
    uncovered by authors on 'Fischer problem'. Leading Soviet GM analyses of Fischer's style, personality, strengths, weaknesses, etc.
    All 158 games tween Fischer and Soviets. Photos and drawings.
  2. 31 Dec '07 11:56
    This post deserves more interest. The book sounds intriguing.
  3. 31 Dec '07 12:00
    Is it in English ?
  4. 31 Dec '07 12:40
    Synopsis
    This magnificent volume contains the extraordinary story of the prolonged battle between Bobby Fischer, the lone American genius who is perhaps the most famous chess player of all time, and the long-standing and all-dominating Soviet chess machine. For the first time readers will be able to view virtually all the secret documents on 'the Fischer problem', many of which have never previously been published. These include papers from the archives of the KGB, the Communist Party Central Committee, the USSR Sports Committee and the Chess Federation. Together with this, there are reports and analysis of Fischer's personality and play, written at the demand of the Soviet authorities by the country's leading Grandmasters, legends such as Mikhail Tal, Tigran Petrosian, Vassily Smyslov, Paul Keres, Victor Korchnoi and Efim Geller. Also contained in "Russians Versus Fischer" are annotations and the stories on all of the 158 chess encounters between Fischer and his Soviet adversaries, and a large number of rare photographs and drawings. This book is a significantly enlarged and updated version of the one first published in Russia in 1994.

    And yes, this version is in English
  5. Standard member sydsad
    Poet
    31 Dec '07 12:59
    Sounds very intresting!
  6. Standard member JonathanB of London
    Curb Your Enthusiasm
    31 Dec '07 13:12
    Originally posted by Sam The Sham
    This post deserves more interest. The book sounds intriguing.
    I second the recommendation. It's a fascinating book.
  7. 31 Dec '07 16:10
    Originally posted by DMD
    Book recommendation: "Russians versus Fischer" by Dmitry Plisetsky
    and Sergey Voronkov(Everyman Chess-Hardback). I own a copy(different publisher), an excellent book. Secret Soviet documents
    uncovered by authors on 'Fischer problem'. Leading Soviet GM analyses of Fischer's style, personality, strengths, weaknesses, etc.
    All 158 games tween Fischer and Soviets. Photos and drawings.
    I totally agree with you.
    Other (similar) great reads are:

    "The reliable past "
    "Russian silhouettes"

    Both are written by Gennna Sosonko.
    I think you will enjoy those heavily if you likes " Russians vs Fischer.
  8. 31 Dec '07 21:23 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by DMD
    Book recommendation: "Russians versus Fischer" by Dmitry Plisetsky
    and Sergey Voronkov(Everyman Chess-Hardback). I own a copy(different publisher), an excellent book. Secret Soviet documents
    uncovered by authors on 'Fischer problem'. Leading Soviet GM analyses of Fischer's style, personality, strengths, weaknesses, etc.
    All 158 games tween Fischer and Soviets. Photos and drawings.
    Looks quite impressive. Here is a link to a long excerpt as well as other information:

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/1857443802/ref=sib_fs_top/002-2135117-4924001?ie=UTF8&p=S00H&checkSum=BfJRtoC3Q9EwzCie52WTfYyemAkKOVeurTyx6JJaGQ4%3D#reader-link

    Just a bit of trivia: but who knew that Fischer had once been a Seventh Day Adventist?
  9. Standard member chessisvanity
    THE BISHOP GOD
    31 Dec '07 22:15
    *farts*

    ----runs off giggling----
  10. 31 Dec '07 22:17
    Originally posted by chessisvanity
    *farts*

    ----runs off giggling----
  11. 02 Jan '08 16:31
    If he was considered such a threat by the Soviet government, why didn't they "take him out" instead of analyzing him ad infinitum? Or they thought they could benefit by him taking chess one step further thus benefiting themselves in the long run when a newer breed of Soviet grandmasters come along; by the time Fischer's phases out nobody from the West could stand up to them?
  12. 02 Jan '08 17:28
    Originally posted by searchingforkolisch
    If he was considered such a threat by the Soviet government, why didn't they "take him out" instead of analyzing him ad infinitum? Or they thought they could benefit by him taking chess one step further thus benefiting themselves in the long run when a newer breed of Soviet grandmasters come along; by the time Fischer's phases out nobody from the West could stand up to them?
    Presumably for the same reason(s) they didn't "kneecap" top Western athletes contending for olympic medals.
  13. 02 Jan '08 19:28
    Originally posted by searchingforkolisch
    If he was considered such a threat by the Soviet government, why didn't they "take him out" instead of analyzing him ad infinitum? Or they thought they could benefit by him taking chess one step further thus benefiting themselves in the long run when a newer breed of Soviet grandmasters come along; by the time Fischer's phases out nobody from the West could stand up to them?
    Maybe they were going to slip something in his drink to make him do doolally then realised there was no need.