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  1. 16 Aug '10 17:31
    Read about it in Legett's opening thread.Don't want to hijack it so....

    Having never heard of it I informed myself about this technique,Novice Nook and some other articles.
    Very interesting.Does anyone here do this?Or has done in the past?Care to share your experience?

    toet.
  2. 16 Aug '10 18:27
    What is it? I'm too lazy to find out for myself.
  3. Standard member Thabtos
    I am become Death
    16 Aug '10 18:54
    You spend a bunch of time writing down variations in sharp positions.

    Kotov would have you write them in an illegible diagram called a "tree."
  4. 16 Aug '10 18:57
    kotov sux.

    stoyko I would assume is great, but I haven't tried it yet. I will in the future for sure.
  5. 17 Aug '10 08:25
    Originally posted by Thabtos
    You spend a bunch of time writing down variations in sharp positions.

    Kotov would have you write them in an illegible diagram called a "tree."
    In that case I think I do this. The Kotov version, rather than the Stoyko version. Not always, and not every possible move - I don't have paper that is large enough for that. This is how I have been keeping track of variations in sharp positions since I started playing correspondence chess about 1975. Never knew it was "invented" by Kotov though.
  6. 17 Aug '10 13:26
    Originally posted by Diophantus
    In that case I think I do this. The Kotov version, rather than the Stoyko version. Not always, and not every possible move - I don't have paper that is large enough for that. This is how I have been keeping track of variations in sharp positions since I started playing correspondence chess about 1975. Never knew it was "invented" by Kotov though.
    It's not to keep track of your game.It's an improvement exercise.From novice nook:

    The idea is to write everything you can possibly visualize from the position, like
    you were playing the game without a clock and you had to see and record
    everything before you move. Write down every line that you look at (no matter
    how bad!), along with that line's evaluation. This should fill up several sheets of
    paper and take 45 minutes up to 2+ hours! If you chose a sufficiently complex
    positions dozens of variations should be considered. Consider lines to as much
    depth as you think is significant.
    You can show your judgment of the evaluation (who stands better and by how
    much – you don’t always have to say why) with any number of methods:
    l A) Traditional: =, ±, ¥, …
    l B) Computer - In pawns; negative means Black is better: +0.3, -1.2, …
    l C) English: White is a little better, Black has compensation for his lost
    pawn, etc.
    When you are done, take your analysis to a good instructor, player, or software
    program. Look at each line to see how well you visualized the position (any
    retained images, illegal moves, etc.?), and also compare your logic (was that move
    really forced?) and your evaluation.
    In general the Stoyko exercise, if done properly, should help you practice and
    evaluate the following skills:
    l A) Analysis
    l B) Visualization
    l C) Evaluation

    toet.
  7. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    17 Aug '10 13:42
    Originally posted by toeternitoe
    It's not to keep track of your game.It's an improvement exercise.From novice nook:

    The idea is to write everything you can possibly visualize from the position, like
    you were playing the game without a clock and you had to see and record
    everything before you move. Write down every line that you look at (no matter
    how bad!), along with that line's ...[text shortened]...
    evaluate the following skills:
    l A) Analysis
    l B) Visualization
    l C) Evaluation

    toet.
    What is the exact method of writing stuff down? A list of moves? Some kind of shorthand?
  8. 17 Aug '10 15:14
    Originally posted by toeternitoe
    It's not to keep track of your game.It's an improvement exercise.From novice nook:

    The idea is to write everything you can possibly visualize from the position, like
    you were playing the game without a clock and you had to see and record
    everything before you move. Write down every line that you look at (no matter
    how bad!), along with that line's ...[text shortened]...
    evaluate the following skills:
    l A) Analysis
    l B) Visualization
    l C) Evaluation

    toet.
    It's not just keeping track of the game. CC is largely about analysis so I use trees to analyse complex positions. I guess I am using a method suggested to improve play to determine what I should do in real games. Hmmm, sounds like I am using it to improve my play.
  9. 17 Aug '10 15:58 / 1 edit
    It might not be too time consuming if someone wrote a handy little app for it.

    I certainly use a diagram to compare candidate moves in complex positions, but I don't keep records of these.

    EDIT: It strikes me that if Games Explorer was working properly (no rush Russ!) that it would accomplish most of this, especially if you could add private notes to positions.
  10. Standard member nimzo5
    Ronin
    17 Aug '10 17:24
    Kotov used this method to move him from promising player to Grandmaster (or so he claims). He would use tactical games with a lot going on from recent tournaments and analyze to definitive assessment without moving the pieces.

    I did this method a lot when I came back to chess after a three year hiatus. Now I play cc, rarely moving the pieces to get the same effect.