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  1. 02 Mar '09 21:52
    I recently bought Kasporovs book on Fischer and have been reading through it, setting up all the positions on my board which is timeconsuming. Is there any ebooks or websites that have annotated games that let you play through them on the computer to save time?
  2. 02 Mar '09 21:56
    I think chesscentral.com has E-books.
  3. 02 Mar '09 22:14
    Originally posted by georgiecasey
    I recently bought Kasporovs book on Fischer and have been reading through it, setting up all the positions on my board which is timeconsuming. Is there any ebooks or websites that have annotated games that let you play through them on the computer to save time?
    persevere my friend, it will get faster until it almost becomes second nature! i do not know why it is the case, but sitting with a book and a board is infinitely more enjoyable than an e book and a monitor, that being said, you may enjoy logical chess, here is the site - regards robbie.

    http://www.logicalchess.com/games/classic/index.html
  4. 02 Mar '09 22:31
    logicalchess looks good, cheers

    Yeah, I'm resenting moving to the PC, I spend enough time at a computer screen as it is.
  5. 02 Mar '09 23:32
    You need to set up the board for the pattterns to sink in.
    You will not recreate these ides in your OTB games unless your
    'chess eye' has seen these positions/patterns and ideas before in the flesh.

    A lot of strong players will agree on this point.

    There is no easy way but it will be benificial. If Kasparov goes to the
    trouble of giving and explaining a diagramed position. The least you
    can do is set up the board so you get full flavour of what he wants
    you to look at.
  6. Standard member Nowakowski
    10. O-O
    03 Mar '09 02:12 / 1 edit
    The post that was quoted here has been removed
    hillarious.

    -GIN
  7. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    03 Mar '09 05:44
    Originally posted by georgiecasey
    I recently bought Kasporovs book on Fischer and have been reading through it, setting up all the positions on my board which is timeconsuming. Is there any ebooks or websites that have annotated games that let you play through them on the computer to save time?
    I agree that setting up positions can add time to your study of chess material, I'm frequently irked about this myself, however there are advantages to actually moving the pieces. 1. It forces you to slow down and study the position more throughly, 2. It adds a level of repitition to your study which helps you recall your book lessons longer.
  8. 03 Mar '09 06:13
    Pretty lame reasons to play with real board tbh! It's up to the individual to spend time analysing when on computer screen, just makes it so much easier!

    But I'm sticking to real chess sets and buying another set to play out analysis. The biggest headache was remembering the actual game position when you'd go off on tangents.
  9. Standard member randolph
    the walrus
    03 Mar '09 07:31
    Originally posted by georgiecasey
    Pretty lame reasons to play with real board tbh! It's up to the individual to spend time analysing when on computer screen, just makes it so much easier!

    But I'm sticking to real chess sets and buying another set to play out analysis. The biggest headache was remembering the actual game position when you'd go off on tangents.
    Learning the material better is a lame reason? Using two sets is an excellent alternative to the cpu.
  10. Standard member JonathanB of London
    Curb Your Enthusiasm
    03 Mar '09 08:22
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    You need to set up the board for the pattterns to sink in.
    You will not recreate these ides in your OTB games unless your
    'chess eye' has seen these positions/patterns and ideas before in the flesh.
    Six months ago I had my 40th birthday. I mention that because I first saw this advice from GreenPawn - not that I knew he was GP then - not long after I left school.

    Those who suggest this is a matter of preference are wrong. Strong players may only use computers to analyse now but I'm sure they didn't when they were learning.


    PS:
    This is assuming people want to improve OTB. For people who want to play on RHP or other online sites it may not be true that it's advantageous to set up positions on a real board.
  11. 03 Mar '09 08:29
    Originally posted by georgiecasey
    Pretty lame reasons to play with real board tbh! It's up to the individual to spend time analysing when on computer screen, just makes it so much easier!

    But I'm sticking to real chess sets and buying another set to play out analysis. The biggest headache was remembering the actual game position when you'd go off on tangents.
    Georgie its recommended that we have two boards, a larger one for the main lines and a second one for the variations, thus when the game twists and turns you can play the variation out on the second board and not lose the position. yes computer is more convenient, but greenpawn and bill give excellent reasons why board is good. i myself learned on computer but wish i had not, you can run through a zillion games without taking the time for the necessary reflective process and it becomes a bad habit and we can end up making mechanical moves, but its a personal choice, if i can ever afford it I will get a Novag Citrine so that i can make moves on a board which will be automatically detected by the computer, wish you well, regards robbie.
  12. Standard member Nowakowski
    10. O-O
    03 Mar '09 08:55 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    Georgie its recommended that we have two boards, a larger one for the main lines and a second one for the variations, thus when the game twists and turns you can play the variation out on the second board and not lose the position. yes computer is more convenient, but greenpawn and bill give excellent reasons why board is good. i myself learned on ...[text shortened]... on a board which will be automatically detected by the computer, wish you well, regards robbie.
    In the beginning of my studies, I employed this method.
    I'd begin by running variations on a smaller board nearby, however
    after reading some news from CJS Purdy in Chess World... I decided
    this method is incorrect. It doesn't strengthen chess vision!
    Playing through the variants on a seperate board may help with
    understanding theory.

    I have a seperate suggestion, leave the pieces on the board
    showing the threatening position. Where annotations or variants are
    available, simply play through them in your head as deep as possible,
    selecting the best move untill you are agreeing as deep as you can.
    When you feel like its difficult to foresee the threats, set the position,
    and look forward. Once done, play backwards through the variant,
    untill you reach the threatening position once again on the board.
    Then play through it in your head again, envisioning the
    threats.

    Play the game move.

    -GIN
  13. 03 Mar '09 08:59
    Originally posted by Nowakowski
    In the beginning of my studies, I employed this method.
    I'd begin by running variations on a smaller board nearby, however
    after reading some news from CJS Purdy in Chess World... I decided
    this method is [b]incorrect.
    It doesn't strengthen chess vision!
    Playing through the variants on a seperate board may help with
    understanding theory.
    ...[text shortened]... ough it in your head again, envisioning the
    threats.

    Play the game move.

    -GIN[/b]
    yes this is also excellent, if you really want to increase your chess vision, play the games blindfolded as Purdy also suggests!
  14. 03 Mar '09 13:06
    Here is a website which has a database of games from quite a lot of books.

    http://www.gambitchess.com/index2.htm
  15. 03 Mar '09 17:06
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    yes this is also excellent, if you really want to increase your chess vision, play the games blindfolded as Purdy also suggests!
    Tough to read the book then though.